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authorMike Pritchard <mpp@FreeBSD.org>1996-01-31 14:32:32 +0000
committerMike Pritchard <mpp@FreeBSD.org>1996-01-31 14:32:32 +0000
commit9bc285fccfefa541493e4fe6b6569bdc7f6c3aa2 (patch)
tree6b03a381b7219c75af675588d28e22388d8e7bac
parent91601563621f060a5138bf4aab345144c8db6f4d (diff)
downloaddoc-9bc285fccfefa541493e4fe6b6569bdc7f6c3aa2.tar.gz
doc-9bc285fccfefa541493e4fe6b6569bdc7f6c3aa2.zip
Bring in some of the spelling fixes from the main branch.
Notes
Notes: svn path=/branches/RELENG_2_1_0/; revision=236
-rw-r--r--FAQ/freebsd-faq.sgml36
-rw-r--r--handbook/booting.sgml14
-rw-r--r--handbook/contrib.sgml6
-rw-r--r--handbook/ctm.sgml12
-rw-r--r--handbook/dialup.sgml12
-rw-r--r--handbook/diskless.sgml8
-rw-r--r--handbook/dma.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/eresources.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/esdi.sgml30
-rw-r--r--handbook/firewalls.sgml24
-rw-r--r--handbook/handbook.sgml6
-rw-r--r--handbook/hw.sgml12
-rw-r--r--handbook/install.sgml18
-rw-r--r--handbook/kernelconfig.sgml16
-rw-r--r--handbook/kerneldebug.sgml6
-rw-r--r--handbook/nutshell.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/porting.sgml8
-rw-r--r--handbook/printing.sgml44
-rw-r--r--handbook/relnotes.sgml10
-rw-r--r--handbook/routing.sgml16
-rw-r--r--handbook/scsi.sgml10
-rw-r--r--handbook/skey.sgml6
-rw-r--r--handbook/slips.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/userppp.sgml12
24 files changed, 161 insertions, 161 deletions
diff --git a/FAQ/freebsd-faq.sgml b/FAQ/freebsd-faq.sgml
index 23d7d98eec..f3d3e59ee9 100644
--- a/FAQ/freebsd-faq.sgml
+++ b/FAQ/freebsd-faq.sgml
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
<title>Frequently Asked Questions for FreeBSD 2.X
<author>The FreeBSD FAQ Team, <tt/FAQ@FreeBSD.ORG/
-<date> $Id: freebsd-faq.sgml,v 1.4.4.3 1995-11-15 07:58:12 jkh Exp $
+<date> $Id: freebsd-faq.sgml,v 1.4.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:03 mpp Exp $
<abstract>
This is the FAQ for FreeBSD systems version 2.X All entries are
assumed to be relevant to FreeBSD 2.0.5+, unless otherwise noted.
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ Any entries with a &lt;XXX&gt; are under construction.
<tag/committers/ CVS commit messages for -current users
<tag/users-groups/ This is the mailing list for the
coordinators from each of the local area Users Groups to
- dicuss matters with each other and a designated individual
+ discuss matters with each other and a designated individual
from the Core Team. This mail list should be limited to
meeting synopsis and coordination of projects that span User
Groups
@@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ Any entries with a &lt;XXX&gt; are under construction.
To unsubscribe, it is as easy. Just remember to send your request
to
<url url="mailto:Majordomo@FreeBSD.ORG" name="The mail administrator">
- <bf/not/ to the list itself. The last thing the subscribred
+ <bf/not/ to the list itself. The last thing the subscribed
users want to see is administrative requests...
<sect1>
@@ -713,7 +713,7 @@ sea32550N|Seagate 32550N:\
<itemize>
<item>AST/4 in shared IRQ mode,
<item>ARNET 8 port in shared IRQ mode,
- <item>BOCA 4/8/16 port cards inshared IRQ mode,
+ <item>BOCA 4/8/16 port cards in shared IRQ mode,
<item>Cyclades 8/16 port &lt;Alpha&gt;,
<item>Cronyx/Sigfgma multiport sync/async,
<item>RISCom/8 multiport card,
@@ -723,7 +723,7 @@ sea32550N|Seagate 32550N:\
Some unnamed clone cards have also been known to work, especially
those that claim to be AST compatible.
- A Dibiboard driver is currently in alpha stage. If you want to
+ A Digiboard driver is currently in alpha stage. If you want to
test it, take the file in
<url url="ftp://freefall.FreeBSD.ORG/pub/incoming"
name="the incoming directory">
@@ -858,7 +858,7 @@ options PSM_NO_RESET #don't reset mouse hardware (some laptops)
<descrip>
<tag><tt/b004.c/</tag>
- Driver for B004 compatiable Transputer boards <newline>
+ Driver for B004 compatible Transputer boards <newline>
<tag>``ctx'' driver</tag>
Driver for CORTEX-I Frame grabber <newline>
<tag>``gp'' driver</tag>
@@ -959,7 +959,7 @@ options PSM_NO_RESET #don't reset mouse hardware (some laptops)
<heading>Are there any Database systems for FreeBSD?</heading>
<p>
Yes! Conetic Software Systems has ported their C/base and C/books
- datebase systems to FreeBSD 2.0.5 and higher.
+ database systems to FreeBSD 2.0.5 and higher.
<descrip>
<tag/For more information/
@@ -1035,7 +1035,7 @@ options PSM_NO_RESET #don't reset mouse hardware (some laptops)
Yes. We support the concept of a ``package'', which is
essentially a gzipped binary distribution with a little extra
intelligence embedded in it for doing any custom installation
- work required. Packages can also be installed or deinstalled
+ work required. Packages can also be installed or uninstalled
again easily without having to know the gory details. CDROM
people will have a <tt>packages/</tt> directory on their CD,
others can get the currently available packages from:
@@ -1247,13 +1247,13 @@ options PSM_NO_RESET #don't reset mouse hardware (some laptops)
for keeping their development trees in sync. We use it to keep
remote sites in sync with our central development sources.
- Unless you have direct internet connectivity, and don't care too
+ Unless you have direct Internet connectivity, and don't care too
much about the cost/duration of the sessions, you shouldn't use
sup. For those ``low/expensive-bandwidth'' applications, we have
developed <tt/CTM/, see the section <ref id="ctm" name="on CTM">
for more about that.
- To use it, you need to have direct internet connectivity (not
+ To use it, you need to have direct Internet connectivity (not
just mail or news). First, pick up the <tt/sup.tgz/ package
from:
@@ -1325,7 +1325,7 @@ options PSM_NO_RESET #don't reset mouse hardware (some laptops)
<p>
Newer BSD based systems have a ``<tt/-b/'' option to split that
- allows them to split files on arbitary byte bondaries.
+ allows them to split files on arbitrary byte boundaries.
Here is an example from <tt>/usr/src/Makefile</tt>.
@@ -1470,7 +1470,7 @@ disk fd1 at fdc0 drive 1
write to through a special program to manage it called
``<tt/ft/'' - see the man page on <tt/ft/ for further details.
Versions previous to <tt/-current/ also had some trouble dealing
- wiht bad tape media; if you have trouble where <tt/ft/ seems to
+ with bad tape media; if you have trouble where <tt/ft/ seems to
go back and forth over the same spot, try grabbing the latest
version of <tt/ft/ from <tt>/usr/src/sbin/ft</tt> in
<tt/-current/ and try that.
@@ -1540,7 +1540,7 @@ disk fd1 at fdc0 drive 1
put additional services like <tt/INN/ or a <tt/http/ server.
The <tt>/etc/rc.serial</tt> is for serial port initialization
- (e.g. locking the port characterictics, and so on.).
+ (e.g. locking the port characteristics, and so on.).
The <tt>/etc/rc.i386</tt> is for Intel-specifics setting like the
iBCS2 emulation.
@@ -1695,7 +1695,7 @@ disk fd1 at fdc0 drive 1
<p>
Some versions of the Linux NFS code only accept mount requests
- from a priviledged port; try
+ from a privileged port; try
<verb>
mount -o -P linuxbox:/blah /mnt
</verb>
@@ -1704,14 +1704,14 @@ disk fd1 at fdc0 drive 1
<p>
Sun workstations running SunOS 4.X only accept mount requests
- from a priviledged port; try
+ from a privileged port; try
<verb>
mount -o -P sunbox:/blah /mnt
</verb>
- <sect1><heading>I'm having problems with my NeXTStep machines and other FreeBSD ones accross PPP</heading>
+ <sect1><heading>I'm having problems with my NeXTStep machines and other FreeBSD ones across PPP</heading>
<p>
- Try disabling the TCP extentions in <tt>/etc/sysconfig</tt> by
+ Try disabling the TCP extensions in <tt>/etc/sysconfig</tt> by
changing the following variable to NO:
<verb>
tcp_extensions=NO
@@ -1889,7 +1889,7 @@ vat_nv_record Recording tools for vat ftp.sics.se:archive/vat_nv_record.tar.Z
<heading>How can I enable dialup logins on my modem?</heading>
<p>
So you want to become an Internet service provider, eh? First,
- you'll need one or more modems that can autoanswer. Your modem
+ you'll need one or more modems that can auto-answer. Your modem
will need to assert carrier-detect when it detects a carrier and
not assert it all the time. It will need to hang up the phone
and reset itself when the data terminal ready (<tt/DTR/) line
diff --git a/handbook/booting.sgml b/handbook/booting.sgml
index f417ae034b..5b4a38b3c4 100644
--- a/handbook/booting.sgml
+++ b/handbook/booting.sgml
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
This conversion has been made by Ollivier Robert.
- $Id: booting.sgml,v 1.2.4.3 1995-10-22 00:50:24 jfieber Exp $
+ $Id: booting.sgml,v 1.2.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:10 mpp Exp $
<!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC "-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN">
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@
Dosboot was written by DI. Christian Gusenbauer, and is
unfortunately at this time one of the few pieces of code that
isn't compilable under FreeBSD itself because it is written for
- MicroSoft compilers.
+ Microsoft compilers.
Dosboot will boot the kernel from a MS-DOS file or from a FreeBSD
filesystem partition on the disk. It attempts to negotiate with
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@
<tag>Netboot</tag>
- Netboot will try to find a supported ethernet card, and use
+ Netboot will try to find a supported Ethernet card, and use
BOOTP, TFTP and NFS to find a kernel file to boot.
</descrip>
@@ -73,13 +73,13 @@
will initialize itself, trying to determine what hardware is
present and so on, and then it needs to find a root filesystem.
- Presently we support the following types of rootfilesystems:
+ Presently we support the following types of root filesystems:
<descrip>
<tag>UFS</tag>
This is the most normal type of root filesystem. It can reside on
- a floppy or on harddisk.
+ a floppy or on hard disk.
<tag>MSDOS</tag>
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@
<p>
To get the user-land going, when the kernel has finished
initialization, it will create a process with ``<tt/pid == 1/'' and execute
- a program on the rootfilesystem, this program is normally
+ a program on the root filesystem, this program is normally
``<tt>/sbin/init</tt>''.
You can substitute any program for /sbin/init, as long as you keep
@@ -152,7 +152,7 @@
<tag/C -- Start an X-server/
- Now you have an Xterminal, which is better than that dingy
+ Now you have an X-terminal, which is better than that dingy
X-under-windows-so-slow-you-can-see-what-it-does thing that
your boss insist is better than forking our money on HW.
diff --git a/handbook/contrib.sgml b/handbook/contrib.sgml
index 005acc6395..f358b91f2f 100644
--- a/handbook/contrib.sgml
+++ b/handbook/contrib.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: contrib.sgml,v 1.15.2.5 1995-11-15 07:51:46 jkh Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: contrib.sgml,v 1.15.2.6 1996-01-31 14:32:11 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<chapt><heading>FreeBSD contributor list<label id="contrib"></heading>
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
<p>This software was originally derived from William
F. Jolitz's 386BSD release 0.1, though almost none of the
original 386BSD specific code remains. This software has
- been essentially reimplemented from the 4.4 BSD Lite
+ been essentially re-implemented from the 4.4 BSD Lite
release provided by the Computer Science Research Group
(CSRG) at the University of California, Berkeley and
associated academic contributors.
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@
their support.
TRW Financial Systems, Inc. provided 130 PCs, three 68 GB
- fileservers, twelve ethernets, two routers and an ATM
+ fileservers, twelve Ethernets, two routers and an ATM
switch for debugging the diskless code. They also keep a
couple of FreeBSD hackers alive and busy. Thanks!
diff --git a/handbook/ctm.sgml b/handbook/ctm.sgml
index ecddd1ae7a..51624ad081 100644
--- a/handbook/ctm.sgml
+++ b/handbook/ctm.sgml
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
<!--
# This is the sgml version of the ctm.FAQ file.
#
-# Converted by Ollivier RObert <roberto@FreeBSD.ORG>
+# Converted by Ollivier Robert <roberto@FreeBSD.ORG>
#
-# $Id: ctm.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.3 1995-10-18 04:36:18 jfieber Exp $
+# $Id: ctm.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:13 mpp Exp $
#
# ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
# "THE BEER-WARE LICENSE" (Revision 42):
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@
Megabytes of <tt/gzip/'ed data is common for a base delta.
If you do have the 2.0-RELEASE <tt/srcdist/, you can instead
- retreive the <tt/src-cur.0372R20.gz/ file, it's only 4Mb and it
+ retrieve the <tt/src-cur.0372R20.gz/ file, it's only 4Mb and it
will take you to current from the 2.0-RELEASE sources.
Once you've picked a base delta to start from, you will also need
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@
ctm -v -v /where/you/store/your/deltas/src-cur.*
</verb>
<tt/CTM/ understands deltas which have been put through <tt/gzip/,
- so you don't need to gunzip them first, this saves diskspace.
+ so you don't need to gunzip them first, this saves disk space.
Unless it feels very secure about the entire process, <tt/CTM/ will
not touch your tree. To verify a delta you can also use the
@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@
interface'' portions, as I have realized that I can't make up my
mind on what options should do what, how and when...
- That's really all there is to it. Everytime you get a new delta,
+ That's really all there is to it. Every time you get a new delta,
just run it through <tt/CTM/ to keep your sources up to date.
Don't remove the deltas if they are hard to download again. You
@@ -176,7 +176,7 @@
but interest has not been all that high yet. Tell me if you want
an email list for that too and we'll consider setting it up.
- If you have commit priviledges or are similary authorized by the
+ If you have commit privileges or are similarly authorized by the
FreeBSD core team, you can also get access to the CVS repository
tree by the same means. Contact &a.phk;
for details.
diff --git a/handbook/dialup.sgml b/handbook/dialup.sgml
index 521f78a074..1848075b3c 100644
--- a/handbook/dialup.sgml
+++ b/handbook/dialup.sgml
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
<!-- This is an SGML document in the linuxdoc DTD of the Tutorial for
Configuring a FreeBSD for Dialup Services by Guy Helmer.
- $Id: dialup.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.2 1995-10-12 03:15:53 jfieber Exp $
+ $Id: dialup.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.3 1996-01-31 14:32:14 mpp Exp $
<!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC "-//Linux//DTD linuxdoc//EN">
@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ version 1.1.5 and higher, there are also initialization devices
(<tt>/dev/ttyld?</tt> and <tt>/dev/cual0?</tt>). The initialization
devices are used to initialize communications port parameters each
time a port is opened, such as <tt>crtscts</tt> for modems which use
-<tt>CTS/RTS</tt> signalling for flow control. The locking devices are
+<tt>CTS/RTS</tt> signaling for flow control. The locking devices are
used to lock flags on ports to prevent users or programs changing
certain parameters; see the manual pages <tt/termios(4)/, <tt/sio(4)/,
and <tt/stty(1)/ for information on the terminal settings, locking
@@ -440,7 +440,7 @@ parity; otherwise, the default is 7 bits, even parity.
The example above starts the communications rate at 19.2 Kbps (for a
V.32bis connection), then cycles through 9600 bps (for V.32), 2400
-bps, 1200 bps, 300 bps, and back to 19.2 Kbps. Communcations rate
+bps, 1200 bps, 300 bps, and back to 19.2 Kbps. Communications rate
cycling is implemented with the <tt/nx=/ (<bf/next table/) capability.
Each of the lines uses a <tt/tc=/ (<bf/table continuation/) entry to
pick up the rest of the ``standard'' settings for a particular data
@@ -519,7 +519,7 @@ kill -1 1
to send the signal. If this is your first time setting up the system,
though, you may want to wait until your modem(s) are properly
-configured and connected before signalling <tt/init/.
+configured and connected before signaling <tt/init/.
<sect3><heading>Locked-Speed Config</heading>
<p>
@@ -774,7 +774,7 @@ If you still can't get a <tt/login:/ prompt, check
<item> The initial capability name specified in <tt>/etc/ttys</tt> for
the line matches a name of a capability in <tt>/etc/gettytab</tt>
-<item> Each <tt/nx=/ entry matches another <tt/gettytab/ capabilty
+<item> Each <tt/nx=/ entry matches another <tt/gettytab/ capability
name
<item> Each <tt/tc=/ entry matches another <tt/gettytab/ capability
@@ -794,7 +794,7 @@ perhaps you can send an electronic mail message to
<tt>FreeBSD-Questions@freebsd.org</tt> describing your modem and your
problem, and the good folks on the list will try to help.
-<sect1><heading>Acknowledgements</heading>
+<sect1><heading>Acknowledgments</heading>
<p>
Thanks to these people for comments and advice:
diff --git a/handbook/diskless.sgml b/handbook/diskless.sgml
index 2a17ac4cd9..9947afc4cb 100644
--- a/handbook/diskless.sgml
+++ b/handbook/diskless.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: diskless.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.2 1995-10-12 03:15:54 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: diskless.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.3 1996-01-31 14:32:15 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect><heading>Diskless operation<label id="diskless"></heading>
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
<itemize>
<item>HP9000/8xx running HP-UX 9.04 or later (pre
9.04 doesn't work)</item>
- <item>Sun/Solaries 2.3. (you may need to get
+ <item>Sun/Solaris 2.3. (you may need to get
bootp)</item>
</itemize>
@@ -61,8 +61,8 @@ server <X.X.X.X> - print/set bootp/tftp server address
netmask <X.X.X.X> - print/set netmask
hostname <name> - print/set hostname
kernel <name> - print/set kernel name
-rootfs <ip:/fs> - print/set rootfilesystem
-swapfs <ip:/fs> - print/set swapfilesystem
+rootfs <ip:/fs> - print/set root filesystem
+swapfs <ip:/fs> - print/set swap filesystem
swapsize <size> - set diskless swapsize in Kbytes
diskboot - boot from disk
autoboot - continue boot process
diff --git a/handbook/dma.sgml b/handbook/dma.sgml
index c08c59629f..9e56dfab06 100644
--- a/handbook/dma.sgml
+++ b/handbook/dma.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: dma.sgml,v 1.1.2.2 1995-11-01 16:40:14 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: dma.sgml,v 1.1.2.3 1996-01-31 14:32:16 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -386,7 +386,7 @@
un-masked. That DMA channel is now considered to be
``armed'', and will respond when DRQ is asserted.
- Refer to a hardware databook for precise programming
+ Refer to a hardware data book for precise programming
details for the 8237. You will also need to refer to the
I/O port map for the PC system. This map describes where
the DMA and Page Register ports are located. A complete
diff --git a/handbook/eresources.sgml b/handbook/eresources.sgml
index aa8260f861..4e9a4d04b3 100644
--- a/handbook/eresources.sgml
+++ b/handbook/eresources.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: eresources.sgml,v 1.2.4.3 1995-11-07 18:24:44 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: eresources.sgml,v 1.2.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:17 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<chapt>
@@ -237,7 +237,7 @@ development for the future releases.
<tag/FREEBSD-ISP/ <em>Issues for Internet Service Providers</em><newline>
This mailing list is for discussing topics relevant to Internet
-Serivce Providers (ISPs) using FreeBSD.
+Service Providers (ISPs) using FreeBSD.
<tag/FREEBSD-MULTIMEDIA/ <em>Multimedia discussions</em><newline>
This is a forum about multimedia applications using FreeBSD.
diff --git a/handbook/esdi.sgml b/handbook/esdi.sgml
index 5d79f44fd3..19f7f4c753 100644
--- a/handbook/esdi.sgml
+++ b/handbook/esdi.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: esdi.sgml,v 1.2 1995-10-07 04:31:20 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: esdi.sgml,v 1.2.2.1 1996-01-31 14:32:18 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
This document describes the use of ESDI disks in combination
with the FreeBSD operating system. Contrary to popular
belief, this is possible and people are using ESDI based
- systems succesfully! This document tries to explain you
+ systems successfully! This document tries to explain you
how to do this.
If you find something missing, plain wrong or have useful
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
Secondly some higher level commands are added, making the ESDI
interface somewhat 'smarter' to the operating system driver
writers. It is by no means as smart as SCSI by the way. ESDI
- is standardised by ANSI.
+ is standardized by ANSI.
Capacities of the drives are boosted by putting more sectors
on each track. Typical is 35 sectors per track, high capacity
@@ -51,13 +51,13 @@
<sect2><heading>Physical connections</heading>
<p>
The ESDI interface uses two cables connected to each drive.
- One cable is a 34 pin flatcable edge connector that carries
+ One cable is a 34 pin flat cable edge connector that carries
the command and status signals from the controller to the
- drive and viceversa. The command cable is daisy chained
+ drive and vice-versa. The command cable is daisy chained
between all the drives. So, it forms a bus onto which all
drives are connected.
- The second cable is a a 20 pin flatcable edge connector that
+ The second cable is a a 20 pin flat cable edge connector that
carries the data to and from the drive. This cable is radially
connected, so each drive has it's own direct connection to the
controller.
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@
is not used.
So, one and <it>only</it> one drive, the one at
- the fartest end of the command
+ the farthest end of the command
cable has it's terminator installed/enabled. The controller
automatically terminates the other end of the cable.
Please note that this implies that the controller must be
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@
<sect2><heading>ESDI speed variants</heading>
<p>
- As briefly mentioned before, ESDI comes in two speed flavours.
+ As briefly mentioned before, ESDI comes in two speed flavors.
The older drives and controllers use a 10 Mbits/second
data transfer rate. Newer stuff uses 15 Mbits/second.
@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@
In my case, the controller could not handle this number
of sectors. It proved to work well except that it only
used 35 sectors on each track. This meant losing a
- lot of diskspace.
+ lot of disk space.
Once again, check the documentation of your hardware for
more info. Going out-of-spec like in the example might
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@
<p>
Translations, although not exclusively a ESDI-only problem,
might give you real trouble.
- Translations come in multiple flavours. Most of them
+ Translations come in multiple flavors. Most of them
have in common that they attempt to work around the
limitations posed upon disk geometries by the original
IBM PC/AT design (thanks IBM!).
@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@
type (but there are probably more like this) offer the option
to logically split a drive in multiple partitions as a BIOS
option. I had select 1 drive == 1 partition because this
- controller wrote this info onto the disk. On powerup it
+ controller wrote this info onto the disk. On power-up it
read the info and presented itself to the system based on
the info from the disk.
@@ -248,7 +248,7 @@
(logically of course) of the bad one.
In most cases the remapping is done by using N-1 sectors on
- each track for actual datastorage, and sector N itself is
+ each track for actual data storage, and sector N itself is
the spare sector. N is the total number of sectors physically
available on the track.
The idea behind this is that the operating system sees
@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ disk wd3 at wdc1 drive 1
<p>
<sect2><heading>Adaptec 2320 controllers</heading>
<p>
- I succesfully installed FreeBSD onto a ESDI disk controlled by a
+ I successfully installed FreeBSD onto a ESDI disk controlled by a
ACB-2320. No other operating system was present on the disk.
To do so I low level formatted the disk using NEFMT.EXE
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ disk wd3 at wdc1 drive 1
BIOS to allow the BIOS to boot it.
Before using NEFMT.EXE I tried to format the disk using the
- ACB-2320 BIOS builtin formatter. This proved to be a showstopper,
+ ACB-2320 BIOS builtin formatter. This proved to be a show stopper,
because it didn't give me an option to disable spare sectoring.
With spare sectoring enabled the FreeBSD installation
process broke down on the bad144 run.
@@ -372,7 +372,7 @@ disk wd3 at wdc1 drive 1
<sect2><heading>Western Digital WD1007 controllers</heading>
<p>
- I succesfully installed FreeBSD onto a ESDI disk controlled by a
+ I successfully installed FreeBSD onto a ESDI disk controlled by a
WD1007 controller. To be precise, it was a WD1007-WA2. Other
variations of the WD1007 do exist.
diff --git a/handbook/firewalls.sgml b/handbook/firewalls.sgml
index 6cdb31fd1f..cc39cdebd3 100644
--- a/handbook/firewalls.sgml
+++ b/handbook/firewalls.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: firewalls.sgml,v 1.1.2.1 1995-11-01 03:15:14 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: firewalls.sgml,v 1.1.2.2 1996-01-31 14:32:19 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect><heading>Firewalls<label id="firewalls"></heading>
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Firewalls are an area of increasing interest for people who are
connected to the Internet, and are even finding applications on
private networks to provide enhanced security. This section will
hopefully explain what firewalls are, how to use them, and how to use
-the facilities provided in the FreeBSD kernel to impliment them.
+the facilities provided in the FreeBSD kernel to implement them.
<quote><bf>Note</bf>: People often think that having a firewall between
your companies internal network and the ``Big Bad Internet'' will
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ generally more secure than normal authentication mechanisms.
<p>FreeBSD comes with a kernel packet filter (known as <tt>IPFW</tt>),
which is what the rest of this section will concentrate on. Proxy
servers can be built on FreeBSD from third party software, but there
-is such a vareity of proxy servers available that it would be
+is such a variety of proxy servers available that it would be
impossible to cover them in this document.
<sect2><heading>Packet filtering routers<label id="firewalls:packet_filters"></heading>
@@ -234,12 +234,12 @@ For the accounting chain, valid <em>actions</em> are:
<tag/single/Count packets matching the address specifier.
<tag/bidirectional/Count packets matching the address specifier, and
-also packets travelling in the opposite direction (i.e. those going
+also packets traveling in the opposite direction (i.e. those going
from ``destination'' to ``source'').
</descrip>
-<p>Each <em>action</em> will be recognized by the shortest unambigious
+<p>Each <em>action</em> will be recognized by the shortest unambiguous
prefix.
The <em>protocols</em> which can be specified are:
@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@ form. The valid <em>commands</em> are:
<descrip>
<tag/list/List the chain rule entries. Unless the <bf>-s</bf> flag is
-given, the format is compatable with the command line syntax.
+given, the format is compatible with the command line syntax.
<tag/flush/Flush the chain rule entries.
@@ -436,7 +436,7 @@ possible attacks and also modification of the firewall rules if your
requirements alter.
<quote><bf>Note:</BF> If you use the logging versions of the
-<bf>accept</bf> command, it can generate <em>large</em> ammounts
+<bf>accept</bf> command, it can generate <em>large</em> amounts
of log data as one log line will be generated for every packet
that passes through the firewall, so large ftp/http transfers,
etc, will really slow the system down. It also increases the
@@ -469,14 +469,14 @@ will allow the script to be fed into /bin/sh and reload the rules into
the kernel. Perhaps not the most efficient way, but it works.
<p>The next problem is what your firewall should actually <bf>DO</bf>!
-This is largely dependant on what access to your network you want to
+This is largely dependent on what access to your network you want to
allow from the outside, and how much access to the outside world you
want to allow from the inside. Some general rules are:
<itemize>
<item>Block all incoming access to ports below 1000 for TCP. This is
-where most of the security sensitive services are, like finger, smtp
+where most of the security sensitive services are, like finger, SMTP
(mail) and telnet.
<item>Block incoming SYN connections to ports between 1001 and 1024
@@ -488,7 +488,7 @@ outside, then extend the above suggestion to cover ports 1-1024.
useful services that travel over UDP, and what useful traffic there is
is normally a security threat (e.g. Suns RPC and NFS protocols). This
has its disadvantages also, since UDP is a connectionless protocol,
-denying incoming UDP traffic also blocks the replies to outoing UDP
+denying incoming UDP traffic also blocks the replies to outgoing UDP
traffic. This can cause a problem for people (on the inside)
using external archie (prospero) servers. If you want to allow access
to archie, you'll have to allow packets coming from ports 191 and 1525
@@ -497,7 +497,7 @@ you may consider allowing through, which comes from port 123.
<item>Block traffic to port 6000 from the outside. Port 6000 is the
port used for access to X11 servers, and can be a security threat
-(especially if people are in the habbit of doing <tt>xhost +</tt> on
+(especially if people are in the habit of doing <tt>xhost +</tt> on
their workstations). X11 can actually use a range of ports starting at
6000, the upper limit being how many X displays you can run on the
machine. The upper limit as defined by RFC 1700 (Assigned Numbers) is
@@ -509,7 +509,7 @@ normally fall outside the 1-1024 range specified above.
</itemize>
-<p>Of course, if you want to make sure that no un-authorised traffic
+<p>Of course, if you want to make sure that no un-authorized traffic
gets through the firewall, change the default policy to ``deny''. This
will mean that any traffic which is allowed through has to be
specified explicitly in an ``accept'' or ``allow'' filter rule. Which
diff --git a/handbook/handbook.sgml b/handbook/handbook.sgml
index 8317c19bd7..05eafa8106 100644
--- a/handbook/handbook.sgml
+++ b/handbook/handbook.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: handbook.sgml,v 1.7.4.5 1995-10-30 17:48:17 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: handbook.sgml,v 1.7.4.6 1996-01-31 14:32:20 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC "-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN" [
@@ -98,9 +98,9 @@ Web server">.
<chapt><heading>PPP and SLIP</heading>
- <p>If your connection to the internet is through a modem, or
+ <p>If your connection to the Internet is through a modem, or
you wish to provide other people with dialup connections to
- the internet using FreeBSD, you have the option of using PPP
+ the Internet using FreeBSD, you have the option of using PPP
or SLIP. Furthermore, two varieties of PPP are provided:
<em>user</em> (sometimes referred to as iijppp) and
<em>kernel</em>. The procedures for configuring both types
diff --git a/handbook/hw.sgml b/handbook/hw.sgml
index 7b388cb8ac..caee46b8c0 100644
--- a/handbook/hw.sgml
+++ b/handbook/hw.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: hw.sgml,v 1.6.2.1 1995-10-12 03:16:02 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: hw.sgml,v 1.6.2.2 1996-01-31 14:32:20 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
<p>Issues of hardware compatibility are among the most
troublesome in the computer industry today and FreeBSD is by
no means immune to trouble. In this respect, FreeBSD's
- advantage of being able to run on inexpensive commidity PC
+ advantage of being able to run on inexpensive commodity PC
hardware is also its liability when it comes to support for
the amazing variety of components on the market. While it
would be impossible to provide a exhaustive listing of
@@ -136,7 +136,7 @@ device sio11 at isa? port 0x138 tty flags 0xb05 irq 9 vector siointr
1995.</em>
The procedures to make a Boca 16 pord board with
- FreeBSD are pretty straighforward, but you will need
+ FreeBSD are pretty straightforward, but you will need
a couple things to make it work:
<enum>
@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ device sio11 at isa? port 0x138 tty flags 0xb05 irq 9 vector siointr
If you do not already have a custom kernel
configuration file set up, refer to <ref
id="kernelconfig" name="Kernel Configuration"> for
- general procedurs. The following are the specifics
+ general procedures. The following are the specifics
for the Boca 16 board and assume you are using the
kernel name MYKERNEL and editing with vi.
@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ to the config file.
The following example is for a Boca Board with an
interrupt of 3, and a base IO address 100h. The
- IO address for Each port is +8 hexidecimal from
+ IO address for Each port is +8 hexadecimal from
the previous port, thus the 100h, 108h, 110h...
addresses.
@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ sio16: type 16550A (multiport master)
&gt; more</tt> will show you the boot
messages.</item>
- <item>Next, apprepriate entries in <tt>/dev</tt> for the devices
+ <item>Next, appropriate entries in <tt>/dev</tt> for the devices
must be made using the <tt>/dev/MAKEDEV</tt>
script. After becoming root:
<tscreen>
diff --git a/handbook/install.sgml b/handbook/install.sgml
index 0f5d4ac35e..9cde9ee19b 100644
--- a/handbook/install.sgml
+++ b/handbook/install.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: install.sgml,v 1.9.2.5 1995-10-30 17:48:19 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: install.sgml,v 1.9.2.6 1996-01-31 14:32:21 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ Boot:
To run the X-window system, eight megabytes of RAM is the
recommended minimum.
- Following is a list of all disk controllers and ethernet
+ Following is a list of all disk controllers and Ethernet
cards currently known to work with FreeBSD. Other
configurations may very well work, and we have simply not
received any indication of this.
@@ -230,7 +230,7 @@ Boot:
time:
<itemize>
- <item>Soundblaster SCSI and ProAudio Spectrum SCSI (<tt>cd</tt>)
+ <item>SoundBlaster SCSI and ProAudio Spectrum SCSI (<tt>cd</tt>)
<item>Mitsumi (all models) proprietary interface (<tt>mcd</tt>)
<item>Matsushita/Panasonic (Creative)
CR-562/CR-563 proprietary interface (<tt>matcd</tt>)
@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@ Boot:
<item>Allied-Telesis AT1700 and RE2000 cards
- <item>SMC Elite 16 WD8013 ethernet interface, and
+ <item>SMC Elite 16 WD8013 Ethernet interface, and
most other WD8003E, WD8003EBT, WD8003W, WD8013W,
WD8003S, WD8003SBT and WD8013EBT based clones. SMC
Elite Ultra is also supported.
@@ -282,7 +282,7 @@ Boot:
Semiconductor are also supported.
</itemize>
- <p><em>Note:</em> FreeBSD does not currently suppport
+ <p><em>Note:</em> FreeBSD does not currently support
PnP (plug-n-play) features present on some ethernet
cards. If your card has PnP, it should be disabled.
@@ -704,11 +704,11 @@ ftp://foo.bar.com:1234/pub/FreeBSD
<item>Select a Custom or Express install, depending on
whether or not you would like the installation to give
you a high degree of control over each step of the
- installation or simply lead you through it, chosing
+ installation or simply lead you through it, choosing
reasonable defaults when possible. See details on
both installation types below.
- <item>The Configure menu choice allows you to furthur
+ <item>The Configure menu choice allows you to further
configure your FreeBSD installation by giving you
menu-driven access to various system defaults. Some
items, like networking, may be especially important
@@ -758,7 +758,7 @@ ftp://foo.bar.com:1234/pub/FreeBSD
your disk so far, nor will it until you give the
final confirmation). All new or changed partition
information will be written out, file systems will
- be created and/or non-destructively labelled
+ be created and/or non-destructively labeled
(depending on how you set their newfs flags in the
Label Editor) and all selected distributions will
be extracted.
@@ -783,7 +783,7 @@ ftp://foo.bar.com:1234/pub/FreeBSD
altering your system <em>except</em> for ``Commit'',
which will perform any requests to alter your system
you may have made. Some of the menu options will also
- have direct `Write' commands available for commiting an
+ have direct `Write' commands available for committing an
operation immediately, but they should only be used if
you are absolutely sure it is necessary. It is generally
better to make your changes and then commit them all at
diff --git a/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml b/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml
index ae97fafbe4..18989c5758 100644
--- a/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml
+++ b/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: kernelconfig.sgml,v 1.1.2.1 1995-10-22 00:50:29 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: kernelconfig.sgml,v 1.1.2.2 1996-01-31 14:32:22 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!-- <!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC '-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN'> -->
<chapt><heading>Configuring the FreeBSD Kernel<label id="kernelconfig"></heading>
@@ -265,15 +265,15 @@
<tag>options MATH_EMULATE</tag>
<p>This line allows the kernel to simulate a math
- coprocessor if your computer does not have one (386
+ co-processor if your computer does not have one (386
or 486SX). If you have a Pentium, a 486DX, or a
386 or 486SX with a separate 387 or 487 chip, you
can comment this line out.
- <quote><em>Note:</em> The normal math coprocessor
+ <quote><em>Note:</em> The normal math co-processor
emulation routines that come with FreeBSD are
<em>not</em> very accurate. If you do not have a
- math coprocessor, and you need the best accuracy,
+ math co-processor, and you need the best accuracy,
I recommend that you change this option to
<tt>GPL_MATH_EMULATE</tt> to use the superior GNU
math support, which is not included by default
@@ -288,7 +288,7 @@
<tag>options BOUNCE_BUFFERS</tag>
<p>ISA devices and EISA devices operating in an ISA
- compatibilty mode can only perform DMA (Direct
+ compatibility mode can only perform DMA (Direct
Memory Access) to memory below 16 megabytes. This
option enables such devices to work in systems with
more than 16 megabytes of memory.
@@ -512,7 +512,7 @@
drivers are for the so-called <em>proprietary</em>
CD-ROM drives. These drives have their own
controller card or might plug into a sound card
- such as the Soundblaster 16. They are <em>not</em>
+ such as the SoundBlaster 16. They are <em>not</em>
IDE or SCSI. Most older single-speed and
double-speed CD-ROMs use these interfaces, while
newer quad-speeds are likely to be <ref
@@ -533,7 +533,7 @@
<tag>controller matcd0 at isa? port ? bio</tag>
<p>Matsushita/Panasonic CD-ROM (sold by Creative
- Labs for Soundblaster).
+ Labs for SoundBlaster).
</descrip>
@@ -944,7 +944,7 @@
<p>SoundBlaster digital audio.
- <quote><em/Note:/ If your Soundblaster is on a
+ <quote><em/Note:/ If your SoundBlaster is on a
different IRQ (such as 5), change <tt>irq 7</tt>
to, for example, <tt>irq 5</tt> and remove the
<tt>conflicts</tt> keyword. Also, you must add
diff --git a/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml b/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml
index 40b6f86509..9834864355 100644
--- a/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml
+++ b/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: kerneldebug.sgml,v 1.3.2.2 1995-10-22 00:50:30 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: kerneldebug.sgml,v 1.3.2.3 1996-01-31 14:32:23 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<chapt><heading>Kernel Debugging<label id="kerneldebug"></heading>
@@ -330,7 +330,7 @@
<tscreen><verb>
x ,10
</verb></tscreen>
- Similiarly, use
+ Similarly, use
<tscreen><verb>
x/ia foofunc,10
</verb></tscreen>
@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@
is the final way out of disaster and almost the same as hitting
the Big Red Button.
- If you nead a short command summary, simply type
+ If you need a short command summary, simply type
<tscreen><verb>
help
</verb></tscreen>
diff --git a/handbook/nutshell.sgml b/handbook/nutshell.sgml
index c822b63cdf..ece0a26847 100644
--- a/handbook/nutshell.sgml
+++ b/handbook/nutshell.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: nutshell.sgml,v 1.1.4.2 1995-10-12 03:16:22 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: nutshell.sgml,v 1.1.4.3 1996-01-31 14:32:24 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect><heading>FreeBSD in a nutshell<label id="nutshell"></heading>
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
shared between all users on the system.</item>
<item>Complete <bf>TCP/IP networking</bf> including SLIP, PPP, NFS
and NIS support. This means that your FreeBSD machine can
- interoperate easily with other systems as well act as an enterprise
+ inter-operate easily with other systems as well act as an enterprise
server, providing vital functions such as NFS (remote file access) and
e-mail services or putting your organization on the Internet
with WWW, ftp, routing and firewall (security) services.</item>
diff --git a/handbook/porting.sgml b/handbook/porting.sgml
index 34f552b304..4ab2acb49a 100644
--- a/handbook/porting.sgml
+++ b/handbook/porting.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.2.4.3 1995-11-16 01:59:13 jkh Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.2.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:25 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect><heading>Porting applications<label id="porting"></heading>
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
<sect1>
<heading>Before Starting the Port</heading>
- <p>Note: Only a fraction of the overridable variables are
+ <p>Note: Only a fraction of the overrideable variables are
mentioned in this document. Most (if not all) are documented
at the start of the <tt>bsd.port.mk</tt> file which can be
found in <tt>/usr/share/mk</tt>. This file uses a non-standard tab
@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@
# Date created: 5 December 1994
# Whom: asami
#
- # $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.2.4.3 1995-11-16 01:59:13 jkh Exp $
+ # $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.2.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:25 mpp Exp $
#
DISTNAME= oneko-1.1b
@@ -882,7 +882,7 @@ lib/libtcl.so.7.3
person who wrote this Makefile]
# Whom: Satoshi Asami <asami@FreeBSD.ORG>
#
- # $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.2.4.3 1995-11-16 01:59:13 jkh Exp $
+ # $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.2.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:25 mpp Exp $
[ ^^^^ don't worry about this...it will be automatically filled in by CVS when
it is committed to our repository]
#
diff --git a/handbook/printing.sgml b/handbook/printing.sgml
index 522749b429..719a6d0890 100644
--- a/handbook/printing.sgml
+++ b/handbook/printing.sgml
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
<!-- This is an SGML document in the linuxdoc DTD describing
Printing with FreeBSD. By Sean Kelly, 1995.
- $Id: printing.sgml,v 1.2 1995-10-01 22:16:19 jfieber Exp $
+ $Id: printing.sgml,v 1.2.2.1 1996-01-31 14:32:26 mpp Exp $
The FreeBSD Documentation Project
@@ -399,7 +399,7 @@ cd /dev
<item>The <em/interrupt-driven/ method is the default
with the GENERIC kernel. With this method, the
operating system uses an IRQ line to determine when
- the printer's ready for data.
+ the printer is ready for data.
<item>The <em/polled/ method directs the operating
system to repeatedly ask the printer if it's ready
@@ -424,7 +424,7 @@ cd /dev
<tt/lpt2/ for the third port, and so on.
<itemize>
<item>If you want interrupt-driven mode, add the <tt/irq/
- specifer:
+ specifier:
<tscreen>
<tt>device lpt0 at isa? port? tty irq <it/N/ vector lptintr</tt>
</tscreen>
@@ -495,7 +495,7 @@ showpage
functionality, you can intermingle plain text with its
escape sequences. PostScript cannot directly print
plain text, and that's the kind of printer language for
- which we must make special accomodations.
+ which we must make special accommodations.
<sect4><heading>Checking a Parallel Printer<label
id="printing:checking:parallel"></heading>
@@ -657,7 +657,7 @@ tip printer
printer, and note it in <tt>/etc/printcap</tt> with
the <tt/lp/ capability; see <ref id="printing:device"
name="Identifying the Printer Device">. Also, if the
- printer's on a serial port, set up the communication
+ printer is on a serial port, set up the communication
parameters with the <tt/fs/, <tt/fc/, <tt/xs/, and
<tt/xc/ capabilities; see <ref id="printing:commparam"
name="Configuring Spooler Communications Parameters">.
@@ -687,7 +687,7 @@ tip printer
add an additional step to the simple setup outlined above:
install an automatic plain-text--to--PostScript (or other
printer language) conversion program. Section <ref
- id="printing:advanced:if-conversion" name="Accomodating
+ id="printing:advanced:if-conversion" name="Accommodating
Plain Text Jobs on PostScript Printers"> tells how to do
this.
@@ -960,7 +960,7 @@ bamboo|ps|PS|S|panasonic|Panasonic KX-P4455 PostScript v51.4:\
input to the job to print, and its standard output to
the printer device specified with the <tt/lp/
capability. The filter is expected to read the job from
- standard input, peform any necessary translation for the
+ standard input, perform any necessary translation for the
printer, and write the results to standard output, which
will get printed. For more information on the text
filter, see section <ref id="printing:advanced:filters"
@@ -1069,13 +1069,13 @@ $%&ero;'()*+,-./01234567
id="printing:troubleshooting"></heading>
<p> After performing the simple test with <tt/lptest/, you
- might've gotten one of the following results instead of
+ might have gotten one of the following results instead of
the correct printout:
<descrip>
<tag/It worked, after awhile; or, it didn't eject a full sheet./
The printer printed the above, but it sat for awhile
- and did nothing. In fact, you might've needed to
+ and did nothing. In fact, you might have needed to
press a PRINT REMAINING or FORM FEED button on the
printer to get any results to appear.
@@ -1232,7 +1232,7 @@ Printer received LF Printer prints CR + LF
<tag/The printer lost characters./
While printing, the printer didn't print a few
- characters in each line. The problem might've
+ characters in each line. The problem might have
gotten worse as the printer ran, losing more and
more characters.
@@ -1553,7 +1553,7 @@ lpr -P bamboo -d fish-report.dvi
Print literal text data, including control characters.
- <tag/<tt/-n// Print ditroff (device indepdendent troff) data.
+ <tag/<tt/-n// Print ditroff (device independent troff) data.
<tag/-p/
@@ -1744,7 +1744,7 @@ lpr -#3 parser.c parser.h
This command is useful while you're testing a new
printer or filter installation: disable the queue and
submit jobs as root. Other users won't be able to
- submit jobs until you complete your testing and reenable
+ submit jobs until you complete your testing and re-enable
the queue with the <tt/enable/ command.
<tag/<tt/down <it/printer-name/ <it/message...///
@@ -1857,7 +1857,7 @@ lpr -#3 parser.c parser.h
text by default. This presents a problem for PostScript
(or other language-based printers) which can't directly
print plain text. Section <ref
- id="printing:advanced:if-conversion" name="Accomodating
+ id="printing:advanced:if-conversion" name="Accommodating
Plain Text Jobs on PostScript Printers"> tells you what
you should do to overcome this problem. I recommend
reading this section if you have a PostScript printer.
@@ -2100,7 +2100,7 @@ lpr -#3 parser.c parser.h
You should also specify the <tt/rw/ capability; that tells
LPD to open the printer in read-write mode.
- If you have a parralel PostScript printer (and therefore
+ If you have a parallel PostScript printer (and therefore
can't use two-way communication with the printer, which
<tt/lprps/ needs), you can use the following shell script
as the text filter:
@@ -2143,7 +2143,7 @@ fi
<p> PostScript is the <it/de facto/ standard for high
quality typesetting and printing. PostScript is, however,
an <em/expensive/ standard. Thankfully, Alladin
- Enterprises has a free PostScript workalike called
+ Enterprises has a free PostScript work-alike called
<it/Ghostscript/ that runs with FreeBSD. Ghostscript can
read most PostScript files and can render their pages onto
a variety of devices, including many brands of
@@ -2344,7 +2344,7 @@ exec /usr/local/bin/dvips -f | /usr/local/libexec/lprps "$@"
argument) on standard input, which is the job to print.
It then starts the PostScript printer filter <tt/lprps/
(see section <ref id="printing:advanced:if-conversion"
- name="Accomodating Plain Text Jobs on PostScript
+ name="Accommodating Plain Text Jobs on PostScript
Printers">) with the arguments LPD passed to this script.
<tt/lprps/ will use those arguments to account for the
pages printed.
@@ -2634,12 +2634,12 @@ exit 0
this is probably <em/not/ what you want. In almost all
cases, you need a text filter.
- The program <tt/lpf/, whch we introduced earlier as a text
+ The program <tt/lpf/, which we introduced earlier as a text
filter, can also run as an output filter. If you need a
quick-and-dirty output filter but don't want to write the
byte detection and signal sending code, try <tt/lpf/. You
can also wrap <tt/lpf/ in a shell script to handle any
- intialization codes the printer might require.
+ initialization codes the printer might require.
<sect2><heading><tt/lpf/: a Text Filter<label
id="printing:advanced:lpf"></heading>
@@ -3350,7 +3350,7 @@ bamboo|ps|PS|S|panasonic|Panasonic KX-P4455 PostScript v51.4:\
By using the <tt/sc/ capability, we prevent the use of
<tt/lpr -&num;/, but that still doesn't prevent users from
running <tt/lpr/ multiple times, or from submitting the
- same file mutliple times in one job like this:
+ same file multiple times in one job like this:
<tscreen><verb>
lpr forsale.sign forsale.sign forsale.sign forsale.sign forsale.sign
</verb></tscreen>
@@ -3697,7 +3697,7 @@ total 337.00 154 $ 6.74
Compute charges with <it/price/ dollars per page or
per foot instead of the price from the <tt/pc/
- capabilty in <tt>/etc/printcap</tt>, or two cents (the
+ capability in <tt>/etc/printcap</tt>, or two cents (the
default). You can specify <it/price/ as a floating
point number.
@@ -3738,7 +3738,7 @@ total 337.00 154 $ 6.74
want to charge for printouts in this capability. You can
override this value when you run <tt/pac/ with the <tt/-p/
option. The units for the <tt/-p/ option are in dollars,
- though, not hundreths of cents. For example,
+ though, not hundredths of cents. For example,
<tscreen><verb>
pac -p1.50
</verb></tscreen>
@@ -3858,7 +3858,7 @@ pac -p1.50
<sect><heading>Acknowledgments</heading>
- <p> I'd like to thank the following people who've assisted in
+ <p> I'd like to thank the following people who have assisted in
the development of this document:
<descrip>
diff --git a/handbook/relnotes.sgml b/handbook/relnotes.sgml
index eaedfa6ca6..1eef6cc562 100644
--- a/handbook/relnotes.sgml
+++ b/handbook/relnotes.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: relnotes.sgml,v 1.4.2.4 1995-11-07 18:24:45 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: relnotes.sgml,v 1.4.2.5 1996-01-31 14:32:28 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -534,7 +534,7 @@
emulator is in its early stages and has not been
extensively tested, but it is functional. Most of
SCO's 3.2.2 binaries work, as does an old
- INFORMIX-2.10 for SCO. Further testing is nessesary
+ INFORMIX-2.10 for SCO. Further testing is necessary
to complete this project. There is also work under
way for ELF and XOUT loaders, and most of the svr4
syscall wrappers are written.
@@ -554,9 +554,9 @@
you can!).
The preferred method to submit bug reports from a machine
- with internet mail connectivity is to use the send-pr
+ with Internet mail connectivity is to use the send-pr
command. Bug reports will be dutifully filed by our
- faithful bugfiler program and you can be sure that we'll
+ faithful bug-filer program and you can be sure that we'll
do our best to respond to all reported bugs as soon as
possible.
@@ -590,4 +590,4 @@
ask about them!
-->
-]]> \ No newline at end of file
+]]>
diff --git a/handbook/routing.sgml b/handbook/routing.sgml
index 19f6643c2e..30067d5a1f 100644
--- a/handbook/routing.sgml
+++ b/handbook/routing.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: routing.sgml,v 1.1 1995-10-07 04:31:41 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: routing.sgml,v 1.1.2.1 1996-01-31 14:32:28 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!-- <!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC '-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN'> -->
@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@ host2.foobar.com link#1 UC 0 0
ISP's Terminal Server. Your ISP has a local network at
their site, which has, among other things, the server
where you connect and a hardware device (T1-GW) attached
- to the ISP's internet feed.
+ to the ISP's Internet feed.
The default routes for each of your machines will be:
@@ -206,12 +206,12 @@ Local1 (10.20.30.1, 10.9.9.30) --> T1-GW (10.9.9.1)
networks.
In one case, the machine as two ethernet cards, each
- having an address on the seperate subnets. Alternately,
+ having an address on the separate subnets. Alternately,
the machine may only have one ethernet card, and be using
ifconfig aliasing. The former is used if two physically
separate ethernet networks are in use, the latter if
there is one physical network segment, but two logically
- seperate subnets.
+ separate subnets.
Either way, routing tables are set up so that each subnet
knows that this machine is the defined gateway (inbound
@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ Local1 (10.20.30.1, 10.9.9.30) --> T1-GW (10.9.9.1)
often used when we need to implement packet filtering or
firewall security in either or both directions.
- <sect1><heading>Routing propogation</heading>
+ <sect1><heading>Routing propagation</heading>
<p>We have already talked about how we define our routes to
the outside world, but not about how the outside world
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ Local1 (10.20.30.1, 10.9.9.30) --> T1-GW (10.9.9.1)
information) that keeps track of all assigned
address-spaces, and defines their point of connection to
the Internet Backbone. The ``Backbone'' are the main
- trunk lines that carry internet traffic across the
+ trunk lines that carry Internet traffic across the
country, and around the world. Each backbone machine has
a copy of a master set of tables, which direct traffic
for a particular network to a specific backbone carrier,
@@ -252,7 +252,7 @@ Local1 (10.20.30.1, 10.9.9.30) --> T1-GW (10.9.9.1)
It is the task of your service provider to advertise to
the backbone sites that they are the point of connection
(and thus the path inward) for your site. This is known
- as route propogation.
+ as route propagation.
<!--
<sect1><heading>Multicast Routing</heading>
@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ Local1 (10.20.30.1, 10.9.9.30) --> T1-GW (10.9.9.1)
<sect1><heading>Troubleshooting</heading>
- <p>Sometimes, there is a problem with routing propogation,
+ <p>Sometimes, there is a problem with routing propagation,
and some sites are unable to connect to you. Perhaps the
most useful command for trying to figure out where a
routing is breaking down is the <tt>traceroute(8)</tt>
diff --git a/handbook/scsi.sgml b/handbook/scsi.sgml
index 48cd4aaf57..9713c9e4a8 100644
--- a/handbook/scsi.sgml
+++ b/handbook/scsi.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: scsi.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.3 1995-10-30 15:23:57 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: scsi.sgml,v 1.1.1.1.4.4 1996-01-31 14:32:29 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@
is important to get clean signals on the bus, without
reflections or ringing. If you once made a long distance
telephone call on a bad line you probably know what reflections
- are. With 20Mbytes/sec travelling over your SCSI bus, you
+ are. With 20Mbytes/sec traveling over your SCSI bus, you
don't want signals echoing back.
Terminators come in various incarnations, with more or less
@@ -259,7 +259,7 @@
by far the most misunderstood part of SCSI. And it is by far
the simplest.. The rule is: <bf>every SCSI bus has 2 (two)
terminators, one at each end of the bus.</bf> So, two and not
- one or three or whatever. Do yourself a favour and stick to
+ one or three or whatever. Do yourself a favor and stick to
this rule. It will save you endless grief, because wrong
termination has the potential to introduce highly mysterious
bugs.
@@ -464,7 +464,7 @@ Feb 9 19:33:46 yedi /386bsd: sd0: 636MB (1303250 total sec), 1632 cyl, 15 head,
The multi level design allows a decoupling of low-level bit
banging and more high level stuff. Adding support for another
- piece of hardware is a much more managable problem.
+ piece of hardware is a much more manageable problem.
<sect2><heading>Kernel configuration</heading>
<p>
@@ -681,7 +681,7 @@ options "TUNE_1542" #dynamic tune of bus DMA speed
<item>
Check for loose connectors and cables.
<item>
- Check and doublecheck the location and number of your terminators.
+ Check and double check the location and number of your terminators.
<item>
Check if your bus has at least one supplier of terminator power
(especially with external terminators.
diff --git a/handbook/skey.sgml b/handbook/skey.sgml
index 4b33dec279..441a925164 100644
--- a/handbook/skey.sgml
+++ b/handbook/skey.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: skey.sgml,v 1.3 1995-10-07 04:31:56 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: skey.sgml,v 1.3.2.1 1996-01-31 14:32:30 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
Copyright 1995 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ command:
$ keyinit -s
Updating wollman:
Old key: kh94741
-Reminder you need the 6 english words from the skey command.
+Reminder you need the 6 English words from the skey command.
Enter sequence count from 1 to 9999: 100 ) I typed this
Enter new key [default kh94742]:
s/key 100 kh94742
@@ -294,7 +294,7 @@ authentication.
<p>The second line (`<tt/permit user/') allows the specified user to
use UNIX passwords at any time. Generally speaking, this should only
be used for people who are either unable to use the `<tt/key/'
-program, like those with dumb terminls, or those who are uneducable.
+program, like those with dumb terminals, or those who are uneducable.
<p>The third line (`<tt/permit port/') allows all users logging in on
the specified terminal line to use UNIX passwords; this would be used
diff --git a/handbook/slips.sgml b/handbook/slips.sgml
index cd12038c8b..eea138c0b8 100644
--- a/handbook/slips.sgml
+++ b/handbook/slips.sgml
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Setting up FreeBSD as a SLIP Server
-->
<sect><heading>Setting up a SLIP server<label id="slips"></heading>
-<p><em>Contribudted by &a.ghelmer;.<newline>
+<p><em>Contributed by &a.ghelmer;.<newline>
v1.0, 15 May 1995.</em>
This document provides suggestions for setting up SLIP Server services
@@ -503,7 +503,7 @@ appropriate for your system. Please see the manual page for
<tt>gated</tt> for information on <tt>gated</tt>'s command-line
parameters.
-<sect1><heading>Acknowledgements</heading>
+<sect1><heading>Acknowledgments</heading>
<p>
Thanks to these people for comments and advice regarding this tutorial:
diff --git a/handbook/userppp.sgml b/handbook/userppp.sgml
index 9265825b71..9f8525fbb4 100644
--- a/handbook/userppp.sgml
+++ b/handbook/userppp.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: userppp.sgml,v 1.3 1995-08-29 01:42:52 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: userppp.sgml,v 1.3.2.1 1996-01-31 14:32:32 mpp Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect>Setting up user PPP<label id="userppp">
@@ -14,13 +14,13 @@
because I am not really much of an authority on PPP. I've got
it working, and want to pass on details of what I did so that
other people can get it working. But I'm not 100% clear on some
- details, so I hope that by writing this and haveing others
+ details, so I hope that by writing this and having others
flesh out some of the information I'm going to learn something
as well.
-->
- <p>User PPP was intruduced to FreeBSD in release 2.0.5 as an
- addition to the exisiting kernel implementation of PPP. So,
+ <p>User PPP was introduced to FreeBSD in release 2.0.5 as an
+ addition to the existing kernel implementation of PPP. So,
what is different about this new PPP that warrants its
addition? To quote from the manual page:
@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@
<item>Your ISP's netmask setting
- <item>IP adresses of one or more nameservers
+ <item>IP addresses of one or more nameservers
<item>If your ISP allocates you a static IP address and/or hostname then
you will need that as well. If not, you will need to know from what
@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ protocol: ppp
written in the chat(8) language.
<tag/Line 10:/ Sets the default timeout (in seconds) for the connection. So
- the connectioned will be closed automatically after 120 seconds
+ the connection will be closed automatically after 120 seconds
of inactivity.
<tag/Line 11:/ Sets the interface addresses. The string x.x.x.x should be