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authorJordan K. Hubbard <jkh@FreeBSD.org>1995-11-14 11:17:56 +0000
committerJordan K. Hubbard <jkh@FreeBSD.org>1995-11-14 11:17:56 +0000
commitab5228b13ac62eda3c2315bd787bd302336079b5 (patch)
tree3d96ee04354f213f378c6adeb5d767d9567903c1
parenta8cdabd49f7205c44a551202d1a3bac3947a2bce (diff)
downloaddoc-ab5228b13ac62eda3c2315bd787bd302336079b5.tar.gz
doc-ab5228b13ac62eda3c2315bd787bd302336079b5.zip
Significant tweaks to this document.
Notes
Notes: svn path=/branches/RELENG_2_1_0/; revision=147
-rw-r--r--handbook/history.sgml52
1 files changed, 33 insertions, 19 deletions
diff --git a/handbook/history.sgml b/handbook/history.sgml
index f978db246c..59adb2d0cc 100644
--- a/handbook/history.sgml
+++ b/handbook/history.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: history.sgml,v 1.1.4.3 1995-10-24 02:21:29 jkh Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: history.sgml,v 1.1.4.4 1995-11-14 11:17:56 jkh Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect><heading>A brief history of FreeBSD<label id="history"></heading>
@@ -29,30 +29,30 @@ clear indication of what would be done instead.
It didn't take us long to decide that the goal remained worthwhile
even without Bill's support, and so we adopted the name "FreeBSD",
which was coined by David Greenman. Our initial objectives were set
-after consulting with the system's current users and once it became
+after consulting with the system's current users, and once it became
clear that the project was on the road to perhaps even becoming a
reality, I contacted Walnut Creek CDROM with an eye towards improving
-FreeBSD's distribution channels to those many unfortunates without
+FreeBSD's distribution channels for those many unfortunates without
easy access to the Internet. Walnut Creek CDROM not only supported
the idea of distributing FreeBSD on CD but went so far as to provide
the project with a machine to work on and a fast Internet connection.
Without Walnut Creek CDROM's almost unprecedented degree of faith in
-what was, at the time, a completely unknown project, it is in fact
-very unlikely that FreeBSD would have gotten as far, as fast, as it
+what was, at the time, a completely unknown project, it is quite
+unlikely that FreeBSD would have gotten as far, as fast, as it
has today.
The first CDROM (and general net-wide) distribution was FreeBSD 1.0,
-released in December of '93. This was based on the 4.3 BSD Lite
-("Net/2") tape from U.C. Berkeley with many components provided by
+released in December of 1993. This was based on the 4.3 BSD Lite
+("Net/2") tape from U.C. Berkeley, with many components also provided by
386BSD and the Free Software Foundation. It was a fairly reasonable
-success for a first offering, and we followed this release with the
-highly successful FreeBSD 1.1 version in May of 1994.
+success for a first offering, and we followed it with the highly successful
+FreeBSD 1.1 release in May of 1994.
Around this time, some rather unexpected storm clouds formed on our
horizon as Novell and U.C. Berkeley settled their long-running lawsuit
over the legal status of the Berkeley Net/2 tape. A condition of that
settlement was U.C. Berkeley's concession that large parts of Net/2
-was "encumbered" code and property of Novell, who had in turn acquired
+were "encumbered" code and the property of Novell, who had in turn acquired
it from AT&amp;T some time previously. What Berkeley got in return was
Novell's "blessing" that the 4.4 Lite release, when it was finally
released, would be declared unencumbered and all existing Net/2 users
@@ -66,27 +66,41 @@ performance..
We then set about the arduous task of literally re-inventing ourselves
with a completely new and rather incomplete set of 4.4 Lite bits. The
-"Lite" releases were light in part because Berkeley's CSRG removed
-large chunks of code required for actually making a bootable running
-system out of it due to various legal requirements and the fact that
-the Intel port of 4.4 was highly incomplete. It took us until
-December of 1994 to make this transition, and in January of 1995 we
+"Lite" releases were light in part because Berkeley's CSRG had removed
+large chunks of code required for actually constructing a bootable running
+system (due to various legal requirements) and the fact that the Intel
+port of 4.4 was highly incomplete. It took us until December of 1994
+to make this transition, and in January of 1995 we
released FreeBSD 2.0 to the net and on CDROM. Despite being still
more than a little rough around the edges, the release was a
significant success and has since been followed by the more robust and
easier to install FreeBSD 2.0.5 release in June of 1995.
Where to from here? Well, we intend to release FreeBSD 2.1 sometime
-in October of 1995 and have reasonable expectations that it will
+in November of 1995 and have reasonable expectations that it will
meet or exceed all of the standards for quality we set with FreeBSD
1.1.5.1 back in July of 1994. From there, we'll probably continue our now
-two-track scheme of a "stable" branch of FreeBSD and an "experimental"
+two-track scheme of a "stable" branch of FreeBSD and a "current"
branch, where development can continue at its usually rapid pace without
penalizing those who just want a working system without too much excitement.
We also intend to focus on any remaining areas of weakness, like documentation
or missing drivers, and steadily increase the overall quality and feature set
of the system well into 1996 and beyond.
- Jordan
-
+It should also be noted that the development of FreeBSD is <b>not</b> a closed
+process, despite some popular misconceptions to the contrary, and anyone
+is free to contribute code or ideas. Once a contributor has established
+a reasonable track record for reliability, we generally even give them direct
+access to the central source tree (kept under CVS) where their changes will
+propagate automatically to all users of FreeBSD. Our centralised development
+model is designed for the convenience of the <b>users</b> of FreeBSD, who
+are thus provided with an easy way of tracking one central code base, not
+to keep potential contributors out! Anyone and everyone is free to
+contribute, and people who've shown a consistent and significant dedication
+to the project are generally asked to join the FreeBSD core team to
+help in setting the project's overall directions and goals. No part of the
+project is closed to additional members, and all we ask of those wishing for
+closer ties to the project is the same dedication its current members have
+to its continued success!
+ Jordan