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authorJames Raynard <jraynard@FreeBSD.org>1997-10-19 13:32:14 +0000
committerJames Raynard <jraynard@FreeBSD.org>1997-10-19 13:32:14 +0000
commitf10114b0930d555e3ce46f50653660aa9f22a9b0 (patch)
tree4841dab3dcf007289f4f5684baaf526dc9007c16
parent040d6afbbeb05074759b2992a3675611c3170959 (diff)
downloaddoc-f10114b0930d555e3ce46f50653660aa9f22a9b0.tar.gz
doc-f10114b0930d555e3ce46f50653660aa9f22a9b0.zip
Spelling, grammar cleanups
Notes
Notes: svn path=/head/; revision=2078
-rw-r--r--handbook/booting.sgml40
-rw-r--r--handbook/ctm.sgml20
-rw-r--r--handbook/cvsup.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/dma.sgml16
-rw-r--r--handbook/kernelconfig.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/kerneldebug.sgml54
-rw-r--r--handbook/kernelopts.sgml22
-rw-r--r--handbook/linuxemu.sgml42
-rw-r--r--handbook/memoryuse.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/policies.sgml6
-rw-r--r--handbook/porting.sgml10
-rw-r--r--handbook/stable.sgml6
12 files changed, 114 insertions, 114 deletions
diff --git a/handbook/booting.sgml b/handbook/booting.sgml
index 5147542962..c3c8d6cf97 100644
--- a/handbook/booting.sgml
+++ b/handbook/booting.sgml
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
This conversion has been made by Ollivier Robert.
- $Id: booting.sgml,v 1.13 1997-02-22 12:58:10 peter Exp $
+ $Id: booting.sgml,v 1.14 1997-10-19 13:32:04 jraynard Exp $
<!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC "-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN">
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@
<author>Poul-Henning Kamp, <tt/&lt;phk@login.dknet.dk&gt;/</author>
<date>v1.1, April 26th</date>
<abstract>
- Booting FreeBSD is essentially a three step: Load the kernel,
+ Booting FreeBSD is essentially a three step process: load the kernel,
determine the root filesystem and initialize user-land things. This
leads to some interesting possibilities as shown below...
</abstract>
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
<p><em>Contributed by &a.phk;. v1.1, April 26th.</em>
- Booting FreeBSD is essentially a three step: Load the kernel,
+ Booting FreeBSD is essentially a three step process: load the kernel,
determine the root filesystem and initialize user-land things. This
leads to some interesting possibilities shown below.
@@ -34,14 +34,14 @@
<p>
We presently have three basic mechanisms for loading the
kernel as described below:
- They all pass some
+ they all pass some
information to the kernel to help the kernel decide what to do
next.
<descrip>
<tag>Biosboot</tag>
- Biosboot is our ``bootblocks'', it consists of two files, which
+ Biosboot is our ``bootblocks''. It consists of two files which
will be installed in the first 8Kbytes of the floppy or hard-disk
slice to be booted from.
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@
<p>
Once the kernel is loaded and the boot-code jumps to it, the kernel
will initialize itself, trying to determine what hardware is
- present and so on, and then it needs to find a root filesystem.
+ present and so on; it then needs to find a root filesystem.
Presently we support the following types of root filesystems:
@@ -83,15 +83,15 @@
<tag>MSDOS</tag>
- While this is technically possible, it is not particular useful,
- because of ``FAT'' filesystems inability to make links, device
- nodes and such ``UNIXisms''.
+ While this is technically possible, it is not particular useful
+ because of the ``FAT'' filesystem's inability to deal with links,
+ device nodes and other such ``UNIXisms''.
<tag>MFS</tag>
This is actually a UFS filesystem which has been compiled into
the kernel. That means that the kernel does not really need any
- disks/floppies or other HW to function.
+ hard disks, floppies or other hardware to function.
<tag>CD9660</tag>
@@ -106,16 +106,16 @@
<sect1><heading>Initialize user-land things</heading>
<p>
- To get the user-land going, when the kernel has finished
- initialization, it will create a process with ``<tt/pid == 1/'' and execute
- a program on the root filesystem, this program is normally
+ To get the user-land going, the kernel, when it has finished
+ initialization, will create a process with ``<tt/pid == 1/'' and execute
+ a program on the root filesystem; this program is normally
``<tt>/sbin/init</tt>''.
You can substitute any program for /sbin/init, as long as you keep
in mind that:
- there is no stdin/out/err unless you open it yourself, if you exit,
- the machine panics, signal handling is special for ``<tt/pid ==
+ there is no stdin/out/err unless you open it yourself. If you exit,
+ the machine panics. Signal handling is special for ``<tt/pid ==
1/''.
An example of this is the ``<tt>/stand/sysinstall</tt>''
@@ -139,7 +139,7 @@
(etc...)<newline>
</itemize>
- Now you run FreeBSD without repartitioning your hard disk...
+ Now you are running FreeBSD without repartitioning your hard disk...
<tag/B -- Using NFS/
@@ -147,25 +147,25 @@
<tt>/nfs</tt>, chroots to <tt>/nfs</tt> and executes
<tt>/sbin/init</tt> there
- Now you run FreeBSD diskless, even though you do not control
+ Now you are running FreeBSD diskless, even though you do not control
the NFS server...
<tag/C -- Start an X-server/
Now you have an X-terminal, which is better than that dingy
X-under-windows-so-slow-you-can-see-what-it-does thing that
- your boss insist is better than forking our money on HW.
+ your boss insist is better than forking out money on hardware.
<tag/D -- Using a tape/
Takes a copy of <tt>/dev/rwd0</tt> and writes it to a remote tape
station or fileserver.
- Now you finally got that backup you should have made a year
+ Now you finally get that backup you should have made a year
ago...
<tag>E -- Acts as a firewall/web-server/what do I know...</tag>
- This is particular interesting since you can boot from a write-
+ This is particularly interesting since you can boot from a write-
protected floppy, but still write to your root filesystem...
</descrip>
diff --git a/handbook/ctm.sgml b/handbook/ctm.sgml
index fdf81f112d..e75d6b4cf5 100644
--- a/handbook/ctm.sgml
+++ b/handbook/ctm.sgml
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
#
# Converted by Ollivier Robert <roberto@FreeBSD.ORG>
#
-# $Id: ctm.sgml,v 1.20 1997-08-11 13:36:04 eivind Exp $
+# $Id: ctm.sgml,v 1.21 1997-10-19 13:32:08 jraynard Exp $
#
# ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
# "THE BEER-WARE LICENSE" (Revision 42):
@@ -92,10 +92,10 @@
special ``base'' delta that provides the starting point for all
deltas produced subsequently to it.
- You can recognize a base delta by the ``<tt/A/'' appended to the
- number (<tt/src-cur.0341A.gz/ for instance). As a rule a base
+ You can recognize a base delta by the ``<tt/Empty/'' appended to the
+ number (<tt/src-cur.0341Empty.gz/ for instance). As a rule a base
delta is produced every 100 deltas, the next one will be
- <tt/src-cur.0400A.gz/. By the way, they are large! 25 to 30
+ <tt/src-cur.0400Empty.gz/. By the way, they are large! 50 to 100
Megabytes of <tt/gzip/'ed data is common for a base delta.
<!--
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@ ctm -v -v /where/you/store/your/deltas/src-cur.*
This behaviour gives us a simple way to maintain local changes:
simply copy the files you plan to modify to the corresponding
file names with a <tt>.ctm</tt> suffix. Then you can freely hack
- the code, while CTM keeps the <tt>.ctm</tt> file upto-date.
+ the code, while CTM keeps the <tt>.ctm</tt> file up-to-date.
<sect2><heading>Other interesting CTM options</heading>
<sect3><heading>Finding out exactly what would be touched by an update</heading>
@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ ctm -v -v /where/you/store/your/deltas/src-cur.*
specifying filtering regular expressions using the
``<tt>-e</tt>'' and ``<tt>-x</tt>'' options.
<p>
- For example, to extract an upto-date copy of
+ For example, to extract an up-to-date copy of
<tt>lib/libc/Makefile</tt> from your collection of saved CTM deltas,
run the commands:
<tscreen><verb>
@@ -216,22 +216,22 @@ ctm -e '^lib/libc/Makefile' ~ctm/src-cur.*
included. You will get the ``international'' version only. If
sufficient interest appears, we will set up a ``<tt/sec-cur/''
sequence too.
-
+<!--
If you are a frequent or valuable contributor to FreeBSD, I will be
willing to arrange special services, one option is delivery via
<tt/ftp/ or <tt/rcp/ to a machine closer to you. You need to have
earned this, since it takes time to do, but I will be all the more
happy to do it for you then.
-
+-->
There is a sequence of deltas for the <tt/ports/ collection too,
but interest has not been all that high yet. Tell me if you want
an email list for that too and we will consider setting it up.
-
+<!--
If you have commit privileges or are similarly authorized by the
FreeBSD core team, you can also get access to the CVS repository
tree by the same means. Contact &a.phk;
for details.
-
+-->
<sect2><heading>Thanks!</heading>
<p>
diff --git a/handbook/cvsup.sgml b/handbook/cvsup.sgml
index 3de7bdef0c..6c0fadd548 100644
--- a/handbook/cvsup.sgml
+++ b/handbook/cvsup.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: cvsup.sgml,v 1.29 1997-10-14 03:14:00 jdp Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: cvsup.sgml,v 1.30 1997-10-19 13:32:08 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect1><heading>CVSup<label id="cvsup"></heading>
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ binary package versions due to the fact that it requires a version of
the C library that does not yet exist in FreeBSD-2.1.{6,7}. You can easily
use <url url="ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports-current/net/cvsup.tar.gz"
name="the port">, however, just as with FreeBSD 2.2. Simply unpack
-the tar file, cd to the cvsup subdirectory and type "make install"
+the tar file, cd to the cvsup subdirectory and type "make install".
<p>Because CVSup is written in <url
url="http://www.research.digital.com/SRC/modula-3/html/home.html"
diff --git a/handbook/dma.sgml b/handbook/dma.sgml
index 13ac32e47d..017d378de7 100644
--- a/handbook/dma.sgml
+++ b/handbook/dma.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: dma.sgml,v 1.9 1997-10-09 22:51:31 uhclem Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: dma.sgml,v 1.10 1997-10-19 13:32:09 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -625,12 +625,12 @@ software compatibility.
0x41e read Channel 5 Scatter-Gather Status Register
0x41f read Channel 7 Scatter-Gather Status Register
-0x420-0x423 r/w Channel 0 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
-0x424-0x427 r/w Channel 1 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
-0x428-0x42b r/w Channel 2 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
-0x42c-0x42f r/w Channel 3 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
-0x434-0x437 r/w Channel 5 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
-0x438-0x43b r/w Channel 6 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
-0x43c-0x43f r/w Channel 7 Scatter-Gather Descripter Table Pointer Register
+0x420-0x423 r/w Channel 0 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
+0x424-0x427 r/w Channel 1 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
+0x428-0x42b r/w Channel 2 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
+0x42c-0x42f r/w Channel 3 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
+0x434-0x437 r/w Channel 5 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
+0x438-0x43b r/w Channel 6 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
+0x43c-0x43f r/w Channel 7 Scatter-Gather Descriptor Table Pointer Register
</verb>
diff --git a/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml b/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml
index c4df1e3ec6..4108b7002c 100644
--- a/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml
+++ b/handbook/kernelconfig.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: kernelconfig.sgml,v 1.29 1997-08-12 09:18:00 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: kernelconfig.sgml,v 1.30 1997-10-19 13:32:09 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!-- <!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC '-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN'> -->
<chapt><heading>Configuring the FreeBSD Kernel<label id="kernelconfig"></heading>
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@
<p>Building a custom kernel is one of the most important
rites of passage every Unix system administrator must
- learn. This process, while time-consuming, will provide
+ endure. This process, while time-consuming, will provide
many benefits to your FreeBSD system. Unlike the GENERIC
kernel, which must support every possible SCSI and
network card, along with tons of other rarely used
diff --git a/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml b/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml
index 588aefd47d..4e73f40d82 100644
--- a/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml
+++ b/handbook/kerneldebug.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: kerneldebug.sgml,v 1.16 1997-08-12 09:18:01 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: kerneldebug.sgml,v 1.17 1997-10-19 13:32:10 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<chapt><heading>Kernel Debugging<label id="kerneldebug"></heading>
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
<sect><heading>Debugging a Kernel Crash Dump with KGDB</heading>
<p>Here are some instructions for getting kernel debugging
- working on a crash dump, it assumes that you have enough swap
+ working on a crash dump. They assume that you have enough swap
space for a crash dump. If you have multiple swap
partitions and the first one is too small to hold the dump,
you can configure your kernel to use an alternate dump device
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@
normally arranged via <tt>/etc/rc.conf</tt> and <tt>/etc/rc</tt>.
Alternatively, you can
hard-code the dump device via the `dump' clause in the `config' line
- of your kernel config file. This is deprecated, use only if you
+ of your kernel config file. This is deprecated and should be used only if you
want a crash dump from a kernel that crashes during booting.
<em><bf>Note:</bf> In the following, the term `<tt>kgdb</tt>' refers
@@ -34,8 +34,8 @@
either starting the <tt>gdb</tt> with the option <tt>-k</tt>, or by linking
and starting it under the name <tt>kgdb</tt>. This is not being
done by default, however, and the idea is basically deprecated since
- the GNU folks do not love it if their tools behave differently when
- called by another name. This feature might as well be discontinued
+ the GNU folks do not like their tools to behave differently when
+ called by another name. This feature may well be discontinued
in further releases.</em>
When the kernel has been built make a copy of it, say
@@ -173,7 +173,7 @@
necessary now. The stack frames are supposed to point to
the right locations now, even in case of a trap.
(I do not have a new core dump handy &lt;g&gt;, my kernel
- did not panic for ia rather long time.)
+ has not panicked for a rather long time.)
From looking at the code in source line 403,
there is a high probability that either the pointer
access for ``tp'' was messed up, or the array access was
@@ -232,7 +232,7 @@
If you need to do low-level debugging on your kernel, there is
an on-line debugger available called DDB. It allows to
setting breakpoints, single-steping kernel functions, examining
- and changing kernel variables, etc. However, it cannot not
+ and changing kernel variables, etc. However, it cannot
access kernel source files, and only has access to the global
and static symbols, not to the full debug information like
<tt>kgdb</tt>.
@@ -245,18 +245,18 @@
name="Kernel Configuration"> for details on configuring the
FreeBSD kernel. Note that if you have an older version of the
boot blocks, your debugger symbols might not be loaded at all.
- Update the boot blocks, the recent ones do load the DDB symbols
+ Update the boot blocks; the recent ones load the DDB symbols
automagically.)
Once your DDB kernel is running, there are several ways to
enter DDB. The first, and earliest way is to type the boot
flag <tt>-d</tt> right at the boot prompt. The kernel will
start up in debug mode and enter DDB prior to any device
- probing. Hence you are able to even debug the device
+ probing. Hence you can even debug the device
probe/attach functions.
The second scenario is a hot-key on the keyboard, usually
- Ctrl-Alt-ESC. For syscons, this can be remapped, and some of
+ Ctrl-Alt-ESC. For syscons, this can be remapped; some of
the distributed maps do this, so watch out.
There is an option
available for serial consoles
@@ -264,24 +264,24 @@
enter DDB (``<tt>options BREAK_TO_DEBUGGER</tt>''
in the kernel config file). It is not the default since there are a lot of
crappy serial adapters around that gratuitously generate a
- BREAK condition for example when pulling the cable.
+ BREAK condition, for example when pulling the cable.
The third way is that any panic condition will branch to DDB if
the kernel is configured to use it.
For this reason, it is not wise to
configure a kernel with DDB for a machine running unattended.
- The DDB commands roughly resemble some <tt>gdb</tt> commands. The first you
- probably need is to set a breakpoint:
+ The DDB commands roughly resemble some <tt>gdb</tt> commands. The first
+ thing you probably need to do is to set a breakpoint:
<tscreen><verb>
b function-name
b address
</verb></tscreen>
Numbers are taken hexadecimal by default, but to make them
- distinct from symbol names, hexadecimal numbers starting with the
+ distinct from symbol names; hexadecimal numbers starting with the
letters <tt>a</tt>-<tt>f</tt> need to be preceded with
- <tt>0x</tt> (for other numbers, this is optional). Simple
+ <tt>0x</tt> (this is optional for other numbers). Simple
expressions are allowed, for example: <tt>function-name + 0x103</tt>.
To continue the operation of an interrupted kernel, simply type
@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@
</verb></tscreen>
The first form will be accepted immediately after a breakpoint hit,
and deletes the current breakpoint. The second form can remove any
- breakpoint, but you need to specify the exact address, as it can be
+ breakpoint, but you need to specify the exact address; this can be
obtained from
<tscreen><verb>
show b
@@ -317,7 +317,7 @@
<tscreen><verb>
n
</verb></tscreen>
- <bf>Note:</bf> this is different from <tt>gdb</tt>'s `next' statement, it is like
+ <bf>Note:</bf> this is different from <tt>gdb</tt>'s `next' statement; it is like
<tt>gdb</tt>'s `finish'.
To examine data from memory, use (for example):
@@ -340,14 +340,14 @@
to disassemble the first 0x10 instructions of <tt>foofunc</tt>, and display
them along with their offset from the beginning of <tt>foofunc</tt>.
- To modify the memory, use the write command:
+ To modify memory, use the write command:
<tscreen><verb>
w/b termbuf 0xa 0xb 0
w/w 0xf0010030 0 0
</verb></tscreen>
The command modifier (<tt>b</tt>/<tt>h</tt>/<tt>w</tt>)
specifies the size of the data to be written, the first
- following expression is the address to write to, the remainder
+ following expression is the address to write to and the remainder
is interpreted as data to write to successive memory locations.
If you need to know the current registers, use
@@ -384,7 +384,7 @@
call diediedie()
</verb></tscreen>
- will cause your kernel to dump core and reboot, so you can
+ This will cause your kernel to dump core and reboot, so you can
later analyze the core on a higher level with kgdb. This
command usually must be followed by another
`<tt>continue</tt>' statement.
@@ -415,18 +415,18 @@
<sect><heading>On-line Kernel Debugging Using Remote GDB</heading>
-<p>This feature is supported since FreeBSD 2.2, and it's actually
+<p>This feature has been supported since FreeBSD 2.2, and it's actually
a very neat one.
- GDB used to support <em/remote debugging/ for a long time
- already. This is done using a very simple protocol along a
- serial line. Obviously, and opposed to the other methods
- described above, you need two machines for doing this. One is
+ GDB has already supported <em/remote debugging/ for a long time.
+ This is done using a very simple protocol along a
+ serial line. Unlike the other methods
+ described above, you will need two machines for doing this. One is
the host providing the debugging environment, including all
the sources, and a copy of the kernel binary with all the
symbols in it, and the other one is the target machine that
simply runs a similar copy of the very same kernel (but stripped
- off the debugging information).
+ of the debugging information).
You should configure the kernel in question with <tt>config -g</tt>,
include <em/DDB/ into the configuration, and compile it as usual.
@@ -453,7 +453,7 @@ Copyright 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc...
(kgdb) target remote /dev/cuaa0
</verb></tscreen>
- Now, on the target host (that entered DDB right before even starting
+ Now, on the target host (the one that entered DDB right before even starting
the device probe), type:
<tscreen><verb>
Debugger("Boot flags requested debugger")
diff --git a/handbook/kernelopts.sgml b/handbook/kernelopts.sgml
index 8351d59a4e..fff4f9d3c6 100644
--- a/handbook/kernelopts.sgml
+++ b/handbook/kernelopts.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: kernelopts.sgml,v 1.8 1997-08-12 09:18:03 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: kernelopts.sgml,v 1.9 1997-10-19 13:32:10 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!-- <!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC '-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN'> -->
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ id="kernelconfig" name="kernel configuration"> before reading here.
<p>The use of kernel options is basically described in the <ref
id="kernelconfig:options" name="kernel configuration"> section.
- There's also an explanation about ``historic'' and ``new-style''
+ There's also an explanation of ``historic'' and ``new-style''
options. The ultimate goal is to eventually turn all the supported
options in the kernel into new-style ones, so for people who
correctly did a <tt/make depend/ in their kernel compile directory
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ id="kernelconfig" name="kernel configuration"> before reading here.
</verb>
<p>This way, an administrator mentioning another value for the
option in his config file will take the default out of effect, and
- replace it with his new value. Apparently, the new value will be
+ replace it with his new value. Clearly, the new value will be
substituted into the source code during the preprocessor run, so it
must be a valid C expression in whatever context the default value
would have been used.
@@ -57,16 +57,16 @@ id="kernelconfig" name="kernel configuration"> before reading here.
<p>People familiar with the C language will immediately recognize
that everything could be counted as a ``config option'' where
- there is at least a single <tt/#ifdef/ referencing it... Now only
- few people probably would try to say
+ there is at least a single <tt/#ifdef/ referencing it... However,
+ it's unlikely that many people would put
<verb>
options notyet,notdef
</verb>
- <p>in their config file however, and watch the kernel compilation
- fall over. :-)
+ <p>in their config file, and then wonder why the kernel compilation
+ falls over. :-)
- <p>Apparently, using arbitrary names for the options makes it very
+ <p>Clearly, using arbitrary names for the options makes it very
hard to track their usage throughout the kernel source tree. That is
the rationale behind the <em/new-style/ option scheme, where each
option goes into a separate <tt/.h/ file in the kernel compile
@@ -129,9 +129,9 @@ id="kernelconfig" name="kernel configuration"> before reading here.
#include "opt_foo.h"
</verb>
<p><em>on top</em>, before all the <tt/#include &lt;xxx.h&gt;/
- stuff. The sequence is most important in case the options will
- override some defaults from the regular include files, where the
- defaults are protected by
+ stuff. This sequence is most important as the options could
+ override defaults from the regular include files, if the
+ defaults are of the form
<verb>
#ifndef NEW_OPTION
diff --git a/handbook/linuxemu.sgml b/handbook/linuxemu.sgml
index f26807dfb5..ffb7f1b051 100644
--- a/handbook/linuxemu.sgml
+++ b/handbook/linuxemu.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: linuxemu.sgml,v 1.21 1997-08-12 09:18:05 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: linuxemu.sgml,v 1.22 1997-10-19 13:32:11 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<chapt><heading>Linux Emulation<label id="linuxemu"></heading>
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ options COMPAT_LINUX
</verb>
</tscreen>
If you want to run doom or other applications
-that need shared memory
+that need shared memory,
also add the following.
<tscreen>
<verb>
@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ libc.so.4 (DLL Jump 4.5pl26) => /lib/libc.so.4.6.29
</verb>
</tscreen>
-<p>You would need go get all the files from the last column, and
+<p>You would need to get all the files from the last column, and
put them under /compat/linux, with the names in the first column
as symbolic links pointing to them. This means you eventually have
these files on your FreeBSD system:
@@ -291,9 +291,9 @@ that should leave you with:
</tscreen>
<p>Please note that the symbolic link mechanism is <em>only</em>
-needed for Linux binaries, the FreeBSD runtime linker takes care of
-looking for matching major revision numbers itself, you do not need to
-worry about that.
+needed for Linux binaries. The FreeBSD runtime linker takes care of
+looking for matching major revision numbers itself and you do not need to
+worry about it.
<sect2><heading>Configuring the ld.so -- for FreeBSD 2.2-RELEASE only</heading>
@@ -329,7 +329,7 @@ version mismatches), and install them under /compat/linux
</verb>
</tscreen>
-<p>ldconfig and ldd do not necessarily need to be under /compat/linux,
+<p>ldconfig and ldd do not necessarily need to be under /compat/linux;
you can install them elsewhere in the system too. Just make sure they
do not conflict with their FreeBSD counterparts. A good idea would be
to install them in /usr/local/bin as ldconfig-linux and ldd-linux.
@@ -362,17 +362,17 @@ in order for the emulator to find them.
<p>Ldconfig is statically linked, so it does not need any shared
libraries to run. It creates the file /compat/linux/etc/ld.so.cache
-which contains the names of all the shared libraries. It should rerun
+which contains the names of all the shared libraries and should be rerun
to recreate this file whenever you install additional shared
libraries.
On 2.1-STABLE do not install /compat/linux/etc/ld.so.cache or run
-ldconfig because in 2.1-STABLE the syscalls are implemented
+ldconfig; in 2.1-STABLE the syscalls are implemented
differently and ldconfig is not needed or used.
<p>You should now be set up for Linux binaries which only need a
shared libc. You can test this by running the Linux ldd on
-itself. Suppose that you have it installed as ldd-linux, it should
+itself. Supposing that you have it installed as ldd-linux, it should
produce something like:
<tscreen>
<verb>
@@ -390,8 +390,8 @@ ldd(1)) will print a list of shared libraries that the program depends
on, in the form majorname (jumpversion) => fullname.
<p>If it prints "not found" instead of fullname it means that you
-need an extra library. Which library this is, is shown in majorname,
-which will be of the form libXXXX.so.N You will need to find a
+need an extra library. The library needed is shown in majorname
+and will be of the form libXXXX.so.N. You will need to find a
libXXXX.so.N.mm on a Linux ftp site, and install it on your
system. The XXXX (name) and N (major revision number) should match;
the minor number(s) mm are less important, though it is advised to
@@ -425,7 +425,7 @@ complain about the incompatible FreeBSD syntax. You should remove
<p>Lastly, those who run 2.1-STABLE need to set an the
RESOLV_HOST_CONF environment variable so that applications will know
-how to search the host tables. If you run FreeBSD 2.2-RELEASE can
+how to search the host tables. If you run FreeBSD 2.2-RELEASE, you can
skip this. For the /bin/csh shell use:
<tscreen>
<verb>
@@ -601,12 +601,12 @@ You can do this by invoking:
</tscreen>
It will ask you to enter your license number and the
Wolfram supplied password. If you get them mixed up or
-for some reason the math.install fails, That is OK,
-because you can simply edit the file 'mathpass' in this
+for some reason the math.install fails, that is OK;
+you can simply edit the file 'mathpass' in this
same directory to correct the info manually.
<p>After getting past the password, math.install will ask
-you if you accept their canned install defaults, or if
+you if you accept the install defaults provided, or if
you want to use your own. If you are like us and
distrust all install programs, you probably want to
specify the actual directories. Beware. Although the
@@ -635,11 +635,11 @@ go.
as the X Front End, and you have to install it separately.
To get the X Front End stuff correctly installed, cd
into the /usr/local/Mathematica/FrontEnd directory and
-executed the ./xfe.install shell script. You will have
+execute the ./xfe.install shell script. You will have
to tell it where to put things, but you do not have to
-create any directories because it uses all the same
+create any directories because it will use the same
directories that had been created for math.install.
-When it finished, there should be a new shell script in
+When it finishes, there should be a new shell script in
/usr/local/Mathematica/bin called "mathematica".
<p>Lastly, you need to modify each of the shell scripts that
@@ -664,12 +664,12 @@ This tells Mathematica to use the linux version of host.conf. This
file has a different syntax from FreeBSD's host.conf, so you will get an
error message about /etc/host.conf if you leave this out.
-<p>You might want to also modify your /etc/manpath.config file
+<p>You might also want to modify your /etc/manpath.config file
to read the new man directory, and you may need to edit your
~/.cshrc file to add /usr/local/Mathematica/bin
to your path.
-<p>That is about all it takes, With this you should be able
+<p>That is about all it takes. With this you should be able
to type "mathematica" and get a really slick looking
Mathematica Notebook screen up. Mathematica has included
the Motif user interfaces, but it is compiled in statically,
diff --git a/handbook/memoryuse.sgml b/handbook/memoryuse.sgml
index 778f920954..30ea9640a9 100644
--- a/handbook/memoryuse.sgml
+++ b/handbook/memoryuse.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: memoryuse.sgml,v 1.10 1997-08-12 09:18:06 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: memoryuse.sgml,v 1.11 1997-10-19 13:32:12 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect><heading>PC Memory Utilization<label id="memoryuse"></heading>
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
<p><em>Contributed by &a.joerg;.<newline>
16 Apr 1995.</em>
-<em>A short description of how FreeBSD uses the memory on the i386
+<em>A short description of how FreeBSD uses memory on the i386
platform</em>
The boot sector will be loaded at <tt>0:0x7c00</tt>, and relocates itself
diff --git a/handbook/policies.sgml b/handbook/policies.sgml
index aa299ee628..6af0167893 100644
--- a/handbook/policies.sgml
+++ b/handbook/policies.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: policies.sgml,v 1.15 1997-08-12 09:18:10 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: policies.sgml,v 1.16 1997-10-19 13:32:12 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<chapt><heading>Source Tree Guidelines and Policies
@@ -92,8 +92,8 @@ produce and install the "tclsh" program and its associated man-pages
using the standard bsd.prog.mk rules.
<p><verb>src/tools/tools/tcl_bmake</verb> contains a couple of shell-scripts that can be of help
-when the tcl software needs updated, these are not part of the
-build or installed software.
+when the tcl software needs updating. These are not part of the
+built or installed software.
<p>The important thing here is that the "src/contrib/tcl" directory
is created according to the rules: It is supposed to contain the
diff --git a/handbook/porting.sgml b/handbook/porting.sgml
index fda57b5a0d..aa3a74221d 100644
--- a/handbook/porting.sgml
+++ b/handbook/porting.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.80 1997-10-12 16:53:58 max Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: porting.sgml,v 1.81 1997-10-19 13:32:13 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<sect1><heading>Porting an existing piece of free software<label id="porting"></heading>
@@ -449,7 +449,7 @@ ftp://ftp.FreeBSD.ORG/pub/FreeBSD/incoming/
<tscreen><verb>
ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/distfiles/LOCAL_PORTS/
</verb></tscreen>
- as the last resort. Please refer to this localation as
+ as the last resort. Please refer to this location as
<tt>&dollar;{MASTER_SITE_LOCAL}</tt>. Send mail to the &a.ports
if you are not sure what to do.
@@ -501,7 +501,7 @@ ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/distfiles/LOCAL_PORTS/
where they will be automatically applied. All patches
should be relative to <tt>&dollar;{WRKSRC}</tt> (generally
the directory your port's tarball unpacks itself into, that
- being where the make is done). To make fixes and upgrades
+ being where the build is done). To make fixes and upgrades
easier you should avoid having more than one patch fix the
same file (e.g., patch-aa and patch-ab both changing
<tt>&dollar;{WRKSRC}</tt>/foobar.c).
@@ -1432,7 +1432,7 @@ MAN8= baz.8
pathname of <tt>less</tt>, use the compiler flag:
<verb>-DPAGER=\"&dollar;{PREFIX}/bin/less\"</verb> or
<verb>-DPAGER=\"&dollar;{LOCALBASE}/bin/less\"</verb> if this is an
- X port, instead of <verb>-DPAGER=\"/usr/local/bin/less\"</verb>.
+ X port, instead of <verb>-DPAGER=\"/usr/local/bin/less\".</verb>
This way it will have a better chance of working if the system
administrator has moved the whole `/usr/local' tree somewhere
else.
@@ -1661,7 +1661,7 @@ msql:*:80:249:mSQL-2 pseudo-user:/var/db/msqldb:/bin/sh
papersize and font units.
<item>The version string should be a period-separated list of
- integers and single lowercase alphabets. The only exception
+ integers and single lowercase alphabetics. The only exception
is the string `pl' (meaning `patchlevel'), which can be used
<em>only</em> when there are no major and minor version
numbers in the software.
diff --git a/handbook/stable.sgml b/handbook/stable.sgml
index b5ad726f52..0455316030 100644
--- a/handbook/stable.sgml
+++ b/handbook/stable.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: stable.sgml,v 1.14 1997-08-12 09:18:26 asami Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: stable.sgml,v 1.15 1997-10-19 13:32:14 jraynard Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
THE FREEBSD STABLE POLICY
-Last updated: $Date: 1997-08-12 09:18:26 $
+Last updated: $Date: 1997-10-19 13:32:14 $
This document attempts to explain the rationale behind
FreeBSD-stable, what you should expect should you decide to run it,
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ next section).
keep you informed of build-dependencies that may appear in
<em>stable</em> or any other issues requiring special attention.
Developers will also make announcements in this mailing list when
- they are contemplating some contraversal fix or update, giving
+ they are contemplating some controversial fix or update, giving
the users a chance to respond if they have any issues to raise concerning
the proposed change.