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authorTom Rhodes <trhodes@FreeBSD.org>2003-05-29 18:51:32 +0000
committerTom Rhodes <trhodes@FreeBSD.org>2003-05-29 18:51:32 +0000
commitc20f67bf4857ad25c7700d92de8710743b8cb490 (patch)
tree429d6d7af4b4080384dd349bdd525d6e50a775d0
parent2b4ce91c463b413665ae1d1eed80c5ecd513a395 (diff)
downloaddoc-c20f67bf4857ad25c7700d92de8710743b8cb490.tar.gz
doc-c20f67bf4857ad25c7700d92de8710743b8cb490.zip
Replace the MS-DOS users miniFAQ with a more formal section.
Notes
Notes: svn path=/head/; revision=17131
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/config/chapter.sgml53
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install/chapter.sgml156
2 files changed, 108 insertions, 101 deletions
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/config/chapter.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/config/chapter.sgml
index 9f03cd452e..78fd389a79 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/config/chapter.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/config/chapter.sgml
@@ -593,6 +593,55 @@ HOME=/var/log
any other dependent services during the next reboot, as
described below.</para>
+ <para>Since the <filename>rc.d</filename> system is primarily
+ intended to start/stop services at system startup/shutdown time;
+ the standard <option>start</option>,
+ <option>stop</option> and <option>restart</option> options will only
+ perform their action if the appropriate
+ <filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename> variables are set. For
+ instance the above <command>sshd restart</command> command will
+ only work if <varname>sshd_enable</varname> is set to
+ <option>YES</option> in <filename>rc.conf</filename>. To
+ <option>start</option>, <option>stop</option> or
+ <option>restart</option> a service regardless of the settings in
+ <filename>rc.conf</filename>, the commands should be
+ prefixed with <option>force</option>. For instance to restart
+ <command>sshd</command> regardless of the current
+ <filename>rc.conf</filename> setting, execute the following
+ command:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>/etc/rc.d/sshd forcerestart</userinput></screen>
+
+ <para>Its easy to check if a service is enabled in
+ <filename>rc.conf</filename> by running the appropriate
+ <filename>rc.d</filename> script with the option
+ <option>rcvar</option>. For instance an administrator can check that
+ <command>sshd</command> is in fact enabled in
+ <filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>, by running:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>/etc/rc.d/sshd rcvar</userinput>
+# sshd
+$sshd_enable=YES</screen>
+
+ <note>
+ <para>The second line (<literal># sshd</literal>) is the output
+ from the <command>sshd</command> command; not a <username>root</username>
+ console.</para>
+ </note>
+
+ <para>To determine if a service is running, a
+ <option>status</option> option is available. For instance to
+ verify that <command>sshd</command> is actually started:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>/etc/rc.d/sshd status</userinput>
+sshd is running as pid 433.</screen>
+
+ <para>It is also possible to <option>reload</option> a service.
+ This will attempt to send a signal to an individual service, forcing the
+ service too reload it's configuration files. In most cases this
+ means sending the service a <literal>SIGHUP</literal>
+ signal.</para>
+
<para>The <application>rcNG</application> structure is not only used for network services, it also
contributes to most of the system initialization. For
instance, consider the <filename>bgfsck</filename> file. When
@@ -637,6 +686,10 @@ HOME=/var/log
<para>By using this method, an administrator can easily control system
services without the hassle of <quote>runlevels</quote> like
some other &unix; operating systems.</para>
+
+ <para>Additional information about the &os; 5.X
+ <filename>rc.d</filename> system can be found in the &man.rc.8;
+ and &man.rc.subr.8; manual pages.</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="config-network-setup">
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install/chapter.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install/chapter.sgml
index 240d24b8a4..b54bbab10b 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install/chapter.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/install/chapter.sgml
@@ -5037,110 +5037,64 @@ Please press any key to reboot.</screen>
</sect2>
<sect2>
- <title>MS-DOS User's Questions and Answers</title>
+ <title>Dealing with Existing MS-DOS Partitions</title>
<indexterm><primary>DOS</primary></indexterm>
- <para>Many users wish to install FreeBSD on PCs inhabited by MS-DOS.
- Here are some commonly asked questions about installing FreeBSD on
- such systems:</para>
-
- <qandaset>
- <qandaentry>
- <question>
- <para>Help, I have no space! Do I need to delete everything
- first?</para>
- </question>
-
- <answer>
- <para>If your machine is already running MS-DOS and has little
- or no free space available for the FreeBSD installation, all
- hope is not lost! You may find the <application>FIPS</application>
- utility, provided
- in the <filename>tools</filename> directory on the FreeBSD
- CDROM or various FreeBSD FTP sites to be quite
- useful.</para>
-
- <indexterm>
- <primary><command>FIPS</command></primary>
- </indexterm>
- <para><application>FIPS</application> allows you to split an
- existing MS-DOS partition into two pieces, preserving the
- original partition and allowing you to install onto the second
- free piece. You first defragment your MS-DOS partition using
- the Windows <application>DEFRAG</application> utility (go into
- Explorer, right-click on the hard drive, and choose to defrag
- your hard drive), or Norton Disk Tools. You then must run
- <application>FIPS</application>. It will prompt you for the
- rest of the information it needs. Afterwards, you can reboot
- and install FreeBSD on the new free slice. See the
- <emphasis>Distributions</emphasis> menu for an estimate of how
- much free space you will need for the kind of installation you
- want.</para>
-
- <indexterm>
- <primary><application>Partition Magic</application></primary>
- </indexterm>
- <para>There is also a <emphasis>very</emphasis> useful product
- from <ulink url="http://www.powerquest.com/">PowerQuest</ulink>
- called <application>Partition Magic</application>. This
- application has far more functionality than
- <application>FIPS</application>, and is highly recommended if
- you plan to often add/remove operating systems (like me).
- However, it does cost money, and if you plan to install FreeBSD
- once and then leave it there, <application>FIPS</application>
- will probably be fine for you.</para>
- </answer>
- </qandaentry>
-
- <qandaentry>
- <question>
- <para>Can I use compressed MS-DOS filesystems from
- FreeBSD?</para>
- </question>
-
- <answer>
- <para>No. If you are using a utility such as
- <trademark class="trade">Stacker</trademark> or
- <trademark class="trade">DoubleSpace</trademark>, FreeBSD
- will only be able to use whatever portion of the filesystem
- you leave uncompressed. The rest of the filesystem will
- show up as one large file (the stacked/double spaced file!).
- <emphasis>Do not remove that file or you will probably regret
- it greatly!</emphasis></para>
-
- <para>It is probably better to create another uncompressed
- primary MS-DOS partition and use this for communications
- between MS-DOS and FreeBSD.</para>
- </answer>
- </qandaentry>
-
- <qandaentry>
- <question>
- <para>Can I mount my extended MS-DOS partition?</para>
- </question>
+ <para>Many users wish to install &os; on <acronym>PC</acronym>s inhabited by
+ Microsoft&trade; based operating systems. For those instances, &os; has a
+ utility known as <application>fips</application>. This utility can be found
+ in the <filename>tools</filename> directory on the install CD-ROM, or downloaded
+ from one of various &os; mirrors.</para>
+
+ <para>The <application>fips</application> utility allows you to split an
+ existing MS-DOS partition into two pieces, preserving the original
+ partition and allowing you to install onto the second free piece.
+ You first need too defragment your MS-DOS partition using the Windows&trade;
+ <application>DEFRAG</application> utility (go into Explorer, right-click on
+ the hard drive, and choose to defrag your hard drive), or use
+ <application>Norton Disk Tools</application>. Now you can run the
+ <application>fips</application> utility. It will prompt you for the rest of
+ the information, just follow the on screen instructions. Afterwards, you can
+ reboot and install &os; on the new free slice. See the Distributions menu
+ for an estimate of how much free space you will need for the kind of
+ installation you want.</para>
+
+ <para>There is also a very useful product from PowerQuest called
+ <application>Partition Magic</application>. This application has far more
+ functionality than <application>fips</application>, and is highly recommended
+ if you plan to add/remove operating systems often. It does cost money, and if
+ you plan to install &os; once and then leave it there, <application>fips</application>
+ will probably be fine for you.</para>
+ </sect2>
- <answer>
- <indexterm><primary>partitions</primary></indexterm>
- <indexterm><primary>slices</primary></indexterm>
- <para>Yes. DOS extended partitions are mapped in at the end
- of the other <quote>slices</quote> in FreeBSD, e.g., your
- <devicename>D:</devicename> drive might be
- <filename>/dev/da0s5</filename>, your
- <devicename>E:</devicename> drive,
- <filename>/dev/da0s6</filename>, and so on. This example
- assumes, of course, that your extended partition is on SCSI
- drive 0. For IDE drives, substitute <filename>ad</filename>
- for <filename>da</filename> appropriately if installing
- 4.0-RELEASE or later, and substitute
- <filename>wd</filename> for <filename>da</filename> if you
- are installing a version of FreeBSD prior to 4.0. You otherwise
- mount extended partitions exactly like you would any other
- DOS drive, for example:</para>
-
- <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>mount -t msdos /dev/ad0s5 /dos_d</userinput></screen>
- </answer>
- </qandaentry>
- </qandaset>
+ <sect2>
+ <title>Using MS-DOS File Systems</title>
+
+ <para>At this time, &os; does not support file systems compressed with the
+ <application>Double Space&trade;</application> application. Therefor the file
+ system will need to be uncompressed before &os; can access the data. This
+ can be done by running the <application>Compression Agent</application>
+ located in the <option>Start</option>&gt; <option>Programs</option> &gt;
+ <option>System Tools</option> menu.</para>
+
+ <para>&os; can support MS-DOS based file systems. This requires you use
+ the &man.mount.msdos.8; (in &os; 5.X, the command is &man.mount.msdosfs.8;)
+ with the required parameters. The utilities most common usage is:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; <userinput>mount_msdos /dev/ad0s1 /mnt</userinput></screen>
+
+ <para>In this example, the MS-DOS file system is located on the first partition of
+ the primary hard disk. Your situation may be different, check the output from
+ the <command>dmesg</command>, and <command>mount</command> commands. They should
+ produce enough information too give an idea of the partition layout.</para>
+
+ <note><para>Extended MS-DOS file systems are usually mapped after the &os;
+ partitions. In other words, the slice number may be higher than the ones
+ &os; is using. For instance, the first MS-DOS partition may be
+ <filename>/dev/ad0s1</filename>, the &os; partition may be
+ <filename>/dev/ad0s2</filename>, with the extended MS-DOS partition being
+ located on <filename>/dev/ad0s3</filename>. To some, this can be confusing
+ at first.</para></note>
</sect2>
<sect2>