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authorBenedict Reuschling <bcr@FreeBSD.org>2019-03-23 04:50:01 +0000
committerBenedict Reuschling <bcr@FreeBSD.org>2019-03-23 04:50:01 +0000
commit06e7dd44a008257bb73090a247b1fc863eb2a2ca (patch)
tree9a42d497c0544a98cdbf117bcec3691f69ae216a
parent54e3ba2ec7382b736893f794bbd454c77426c9b9 (diff)
downloaddoc-06e7dd44a0.tar.gz
doc-06e7dd44a0.zip
Cleanup a couple of igor warnings.
This file had a lot of long lines in it as well as redundant markup with words. A few capitalizations were also fixed, except a few where it would obscure the original meaning like groff.
Notes
Notes: svn path=/head/; revision=52891
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/fonts/article.xml294
1 files changed, 165 insertions, 129 deletions
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/fonts/article.xml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/fonts/article.xml
index fc3932f2ee..1c9f5a2492 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/fonts/article.xml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/fonts/article.xml
@@ -23,14 +23,21 @@
updated to reflect changes in FreeBSD system configuration
files by Mark Ovens <mark@ukug.uk.FreeBSD.org> 27/5/00
-->
-<article xmlns="http://docbook.org/ns/docbook" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" version="5.0" xml:lang="en">
- <info><title>Fonts and FreeBSD</title><subtitle>A Tutorial</subtitle>
-
+<article xmlns="http://docbook.org/ns/docbook"
+ xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" version="5.0"
+ xml:lang="en">
+ <info>
+ <title>Fonts and FreeBSD</title>
-
+ <subtitle>A Tutorial</subtitle>
<authorgroup>
- <author><personname><firstname>Dave</firstname><surname>Bodenstab</surname></personname><affiliation>
+ <author>
+ <personname>
+ <firstname>Dave</firstname>
+ <surname>Bodenstab</surname>
+ </personname>
+ <affiliation>
<address>
<email>imdave@synet.net</email>
</address>
@@ -54,10 +61,12 @@
<abstract>
<para>This document contains a description of the various font
files that may be used with FreeBSD and the syscons driver,
- <application>X11</application>, <application>Ghostscript</application>
- and <application>Groff</application>. Cookbook examples are provided
- for switching the syscons display to 80x60 mode, and for using
- type 1 fonts with the above application programs.</para>
+ <application>X11</application>,
+ <application>Ghostscript</application> and
+ <application>Groff</application>. Cookbook examples are
+ provided for switching the syscons display to 80x60 mode, and
+ for using type 1 fonts with the above application
+ programs.</para>
</abstract>
</info>
@@ -73,14 +82,15 @@
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="terminology">
- <title>Basic terminology</title>
+ <title>Basic Terminology</title>
<para>There are many different font formats and associated font
file suffixes. A few that will be addressed here are:</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
- <term><filename>.pfa</filename>, <filename>.pfb</filename></term>
+ <term>
+ <filename>.pfa</filename>, <filename>.pfb</filename></term>
<listitem>
<para>&postscript; type 1 fonts. The
@@ -126,7 +136,10 @@
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
- <term><filename>.fon</filename>, <filename>.fnt</filename></term>
+ <term>
+ <filename>.fon</filename>,
+ <filename>.fnt</filename>
+ </term>
<listitem>
<para>Bitmapped screen fonts</para>
@@ -134,7 +147,7 @@
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
- <para>The <filename>.fot</filename> file is used by &windows; as
+ <para>The <filename>.fot</filename> is used by &windows; as
sort of a symbolic link to the actual &truetype; font
(<filename>.ttf</filename>) file. The <filename>.fon</filename>
font files are also used by Windows. I know of no way to use
@@ -142,7 +155,7 @@
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="font-formats">
- <title>What font formats can I use?</title>
+ <title>What Font Formats Can I Use?</title>
<para>Which font file format is useful depends on the application
being used. FreeBSD by itself uses no fonts. Application
@@ -225,16 +238,16 @@
they chose this suffix. Therefore, it is likely that files with
this suffix are not all the same format; specifically, the
<filename>.fnt</filename> files used by syscons under FreeBSD
- may not be the same format as a <filename>.fnt</filename> file
- one encounters in the &ms-dos;/&windows; environment. I have not
+ may not be the same format as a <filename>.fnt</filename> one
+ encounters in the &ms-dos;/&windows; environment. I have not
made any attempt at using other <filename>.fnt</filename> files
other than those provided with FreeBSD.</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="virtual-console">
- <title>Setting a virtual console to 80x60 line mode</title>
+ <title>Setting a Virtual Console to 80x60 Line Mode</title>
- <para>First, an 8x8 font must be loaded. To do this,
+ <para>First, an 8x8 font must be loaded. To do this,
<filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename> should contain the
line (change the font name to an appropriate one for
your locale):</para>
@@ -252,40 +265,43 @@
<para>Various screen-oriented programs, such as &man.vi.1;, must
be able to determine the current screen dimensions. As this is
- achieved this through <command>ioctl</command> calls to the console
- driver (such as &man.syscons.4;) they will correctly determine the new
- screen dimensions.</para>
+ achieved this through <command>ioctl</command> calls to the
+ console driver (such as &man.syscons.4;) they will correctly
+ determine the new screen dimensions.</para>
<para>To make this more seamless, one can embed these commands in
the startup scripts so it takes place when the system boots.
- To do this is add this line to <filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>
- </para>
+ To do this is add this line to
+ <filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>.</para>
- <informalexample>
- <programlisting>allscreens_flags="VGA_80x60" # Set this vidcontrol mode for all virtual screens
- </programlisting>
- </informalexample>
+ <informalexample>
+ <programlisting>allscreens_flags="VGA_80x60" # Set this vidcontrol mode for all virtual screens</programlisting>
+ </informalexample>
<para>References: &man.rc.conf.5;, &man.vidcontrol.1;.</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="type1-fonts-x11">
- <title>Using type 1 fonts with <application>X11</application></title>
-
- <para><application>X11</application> can use either the <filename>.pfa</filename> or the
- <filename>.pfb</filename> format fonts. The <application>X11</application> fonts are
- located in various subdirectories under
+ <title>Using Type 1 Fonts with
+ <application>X11</application></title>
+
+ <para><application>X11</application> can use either the
+ <filename>.pfa</filename> or the
+ <filename>.pfb</filename> format fonts. The
+ <application>X11</application> fonts are located in various
+ subdirectories under
<filename>/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts</filename>. Each font file
- is cross referenced to its <application>X11</application> name by the contents of the
- <filename>fonts.dir</filename> file in each directory.</para>
-
- <para>There is already a directory named <filename>Type1</filename>. The
- most straight forward way to add a new font is to put it into
- this directory. A better way is to keep all new fonts in a
- separate directory and use a symbolic link to the additional
- font. This allows one to more easily keep track of ones fonts
- without confusing them with the fonts that were originally
- provided. For example:</para>
+ is cross referenced to its <application>X11</application> name
+ by the contents of <filename>fonts.dir</filename> in each
+ directory.</para>
+
+ <para>There is already a directory named
+ <filename>Type1</filename>. The most straight forward way to
+ add a new font is to put it into this directory. A better way
+ is to keep all new fonts in a separate directory and use a
+ symbolic link to the additional font. This allows one to more
+ easily keep track of ones fonts without confusing them with the
+ fonts that were originally provided. For example:</para>
<informalexample>
<screen><lineannotation>Create a directory to contain the font files</lineannotation>
@@ -302,9 +318,10 @@
&prompt.user; <userinput>echo showboat - InfoMagic CICA, Dec 1994, /fonts/atm/showboat &gt;&gt;INDEX</userinput></screen>
</informalexample>
- <para>Now, to use a new font with <application>X11</application>, one must make the font file
- available and update the font name files. The <application>X11</application> font names
- look like:</para>
+ <para>Now, to use a new font with <application>X11</application>,
+ one must make the font file available and update the font name
+ files. The <application>X11</application> font names look
+ like:</para>
<informalexample>
<programlisting>-bitstream-charter-medium-r-normal-xxx-0-0-0-0-p-0-iso8859-1
@@ -395,7 +412,9 @@ end readonly def
<term>Slant</term>
<listitem>
- <para><emphasis remap="bf">r</emphasis>oman, <emphasis remap="bf">i</emphasis>talic, <emphasis remap="bf">o</emphasis>blique, etc. Since the
+ <para><emphasis remap="bf">r</emphasis>oman, <emphasis
+ remap="bf">i</emphasis>talic, <emphasis
+ remap="bf">o</emphasis>blique, etc. Since the
<emphasis>ItalicAngle</emphasis> is zero,
<emphasis>roman</emphasis> will be used.</para>
</listitem>
@@ -433,9 +452,9 @@ end readonly def
<para>All of these names are arbitrary, but one should strive to
be compatible with the existing conventions. A font is
- referenced by name with possible wild cards by an <application>X11</application> program,
- so the name chosen should make some sense. One might begin by
- simply using
+ referenced by name with possible wild cards by an
+ <application>X11</application> program, so the name chosen
+ should make some sense. One might begin by simply using
<informalexample>
<screen>&hellip;-normal-r-normal-&hellip;-p-&hellip;</screen>
@@ -477,19 +496,23 @@ showboat.pfb -type1-showboat-medium-r-normal-decorative-0-0-0-0-p-0-iso8859-1
</informalexample>
<para>References: &man.xfontsel.1;, &man.xset.1;, <citetitle>The X
- Windows System in a Nutshell</citetitle>, <link xlink:href="http://www.ora.com/">O'Reilly &amp;
+ Windows System in a Nutshell</citetitle>, <link
+ xlink:href="http://www.ora.com/">O'Reilly &amp;
Associates</link>.</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="type1-fonts-ghostscript">
- <title>Using type 1 fonts with Ghostscript</title>
-
- <para><application>Ghostscript</application> references a font via its <filename>Fontmap</filename>
- file. This must be modified in a similar way to the <application>X11</application>
- <filename>fonts.dir</filename> file. <application>Ghostscript</application> can use either
- the <filename>.pfa</filename> or the <filename>.pfb</filename>
+ <title>Using Type 1 Fonts with Ghostscript</title>
+
+ <para><application>Ghostscript</application> references a font via
+ its <filename>Fontmap</filename>. This must be modified in
+ a similar way to the <application>X11</application>
+ <filename>fonts.dir</filename>.
+ <application>Ghostscript</application> can use either the
+ <filename>.pfa</filename> or the <filename>.pfb</filename>
format fonts. Using the font from the previous example, here is
- how to use it with <application>Ghostscript</application>:</para>
+ how to use it with
+ <application>Ghostscript</application>:</para>
<informalexample>
<screen><lineannotation>Put the font in Ghostscript's font directory</lineannotation>
@@ -526,19 +549,23 @@ GS&gt;<userinput>quit</userinput></screen>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="type1-fonts-groff">
- <title>Using type 1 fonts with Groff</title>
+ <title>Using Type 1 Fonts with Groff</title>
- <para>Now that the new font can be used by both <application>X11</application> and
- <application>Ghostscript</application>, how can one use the new font
- with <application>groff</application>? First of
+ <para>Now that the new font can be used by both
+ <application>X11</application> and
+ <application>Ghostscript</application>, how can one use the new
+ font with <application>groff</application>? First of
all, since we are dealing with type 1 &postscript; fonts, the
- <application>groff</application> device that is applicable is the <emphasis>ps</emphasis>
- device. A font file must be created for each font that <application>groff</application>
- can use. A <application>groff</application> font name is just a file in
+ <application>groff</application> device that is applicable is
+ the <emphasis>ps</emphasis>
+ device. A font file must be created for each font that
+ <application>groff</application> can use. A
+ <application>groff</application> font name is just a file in
<filename>/usr/share/groff_font/devps</filename>. With our
example, the font file could be
<filename>/usr/share/groff_font/devps/SHOWBOAT</filename>. The
- file must be created using tools provided by <application>groff</application>.</para>
+ file must be created using tools provided by
+ <application>groff</application>.</para>
<para>The first tool is <command>afmtodit</command>. This is not
normally installed, so it must be retrieved from the source
@@ -554,9 +581,9 @@ GS&gt;<userinput>quit</userinput></screen>
:wq</userinput></screen>
</informalexample>
- <para>This tool will create the <application>groff</application> font file from the metrics
- file (<filename>.afm</filename> suffix.) Continuing with our
- example:</para>
+ <para>This tool will create the <application>groff</application>
+ font file from the metrics file (<filename>.afm</filename>
+ suffix.) Continuing with our example:</para>
<informalexample>
<screen><lineannotation>Many .afm files are in Mac format&hellip; ^M delimited lines
@@ -573,25 +600,25 @@ We need to convert them to &unix; style ^J delimited lines</lineannotation>
<para>The font can now be referenced with the name
SHOWBOAT.</para>
- <para>If <application>Ghostscript</application> is used to drive the printers on the system,
- then nothing more needs to be done. However, if true &postscript;
- printers are used, then the font must be downloaded to the
- printer in order for the font to be used (unless the printer
- happens to have the showboat font built in or on an accessible
- font disk.) The final step is to create a downloadable font.
- The <command>pfbtops</command> tool is used to create the
- <filename>.pfa</filename> format of the font, and the
- <filename>download</filename> file is modified to reference the new
- font. The <filename>download</filename> file must reference the
- internal name of the font. This can easily be determined from
- the groff font file as illustrated:</para>
+ <para>If <application>Ghostscript</application> is used to drive
+ the printers on the system, then nothing more needs to be done.
+ However, if true &postscript; printers are used, then the font
+ must be downloaded to the printer in order for the font to be
+ used (unless the printer happens to have the showboat font built
+ in or on an accessible font disk.) The final step is to create
+ a downloadable font. The <command>pfbtops</command> tool is
+ used to create the <filename>.pfa</filename> format of the font,
+ and <filename>download</filename> is modified to
+ reference the new font. The <filename>download</filename>
+ must reference the internal name of the font. This can easily
+ be determined from the groff font file as illustrated:</para>
<informalexample>
<screen><lineannotation>Create the .pfa font file</lineannotation>
&prompt.user; <userinput>pfbtops /usr/local/share/fonts/type1/showboat.pfb &gt;showboat.pfa</userinput></screen>
</informalexample>
- <para>Of course, if the <filename>.pfa</filename> file is already
+ <para>Of course, if <filename>.pfa</filename> is already
available, just use a symbolic link to reference it.</para>
<informalexample>
@@ -652,7 +679,7 @@ EOF</userinput>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="convert-truetype">
- <title>Converting TrueType fonts to a groff/PostScript format for
+ <title>Converting TrueType Fonts to a groff/PostScript Format For
groff</title>
<para>This potentially requires a bit of work, simply because it
@@ -668,12 +695,13 @@ EOF</userinput>
allows conversion of a TrueType font to an ascii font
metric (<filename>.afm</filename>) file.</para>
- <para>Currently available at <uri xlink:href="http://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/pub/GUST/contrib/BachoTeX98/ttf2pf/">http://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/pub/GUST/contrib/BachoTeX98/ttf2pf/</uri>.
+ <para>Currently available at <uri
+ xlink:href="http://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/pub/GUST/contrib/BachoTeX98/ttf2pf/">http://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/pub/GUST/contrib/BachoTeX98/ttf2pf/</uri>.
Note: These files are PostScript programs and must be
- downloaded to disk by holding down the
- <keycap>Shift</keycap> key when clicking on the link.
- Otherwise, your browser may try to launch
- <application>ghostview</application> to view them.</para>
+ downloaded to disk by holding down <keycap>Shift</keycap>
+ when clicking on the link. Otherwise, your browser may
+ try to launch <application>ghostview</application> to view
+ them.</para>
<para>The files of interest are:</para>
@@ -697,10 +725,10 @@ EOF</userinput>
upper case, so any renaming must be consistent with this.
(Actually, <filename>GS_TTF.PS</filename> and
<filename>PFS2AFM.PS</filename> are supposedly part of the
- <application>Ghostscript</application> distribution, but it is just as easy to use
- these as an isolated utility. FreeBSD does not seem to
- include the latter.) You also may want to have these
- installed to
+ <application>Ghostscript</application> distribution, but
+ it is just as easy to use these as an isolated utility.
+ FreeBSD does not seem to include the latter.) You also may
+ want to have these installed to
<filename>/usr/local/share/groff_font/devps</filename>(?).</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
@@ -709,13 +737,14 @@ EOF</userinput>
<term><command>afmtodit</command></term>
<listitem>
- <para>Creates font files for use with <application>groff</application> from ascii font
- metrics file. This usually resides in the directory,
+ <para>Creates font files for use with
+ <application>groff</application> from ascii font metrics
+ file. This usually resides in the directory,
<filename>/usr/src/contrib/groff/afmtodit</filename>, and
requires some work to get going.</para>
<note>
- <para> If you are paranoid about working in the
+ <para>If you are paranoid about working in the
<filename>/usr/src</filename> tree, simply copy the
contents of the above directory to a work
location.</para>
@@ -740,21 +769,20 @@ EOF</userinput>
<orderedlist>
<listitem>
- <para>Create the <filename>.afm</filename> file by
- typing:</para>
+ <para>Create <filename>.afm</filename> by typing:</para>
<screen><prompt>%</prompt> <userinput>gs -dNODISPLAY -q -- ttf2pf.ps <replaceable>TTF_name</replaceable> <replaceable>PS_font_name</replaceable> <replaceable>AFM_name</replaceable></userinput></screen>
<para>Where, <replaceable>TTF_name</replaceable> is your
TrueType font file, <replaceable>PS_font_name</replaceable>
- is the file name for the <filename>.pfa</filename> file,
+ is the file name for <filename>.pfa</filename>,
<replaceable>AFM_name</replaceable> is the name you wish for
- the <filename>.afm</filename> file. If you do not specify
+ <filename>.afm</filename>. If you do not specify
output file names for the <filename>.pfa</filename> or
<filename>.afm</filename> files, then default names will be
generated from the TrueType font file name.</para>
- <para>This also produces a <filename>.pfa</filename> file, the
+ <para>This also produces a <filename>.pfa</filename>, the
ascii PostScript font metrics file
(<filename>.pfb</filename> is for the binary form). This
will not be needed, but could (I think) be useful for a
@@ -781,7 +809,8 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para>Create the <application>groff</application> PostScript file:</para>
+ <para>Create the <application>groff</application> PostScript
+ file:</para>
<para>Change directories to
<filename>/usr/share/groff_font/devps</filename> so as to
@@ -802,11 +831,11 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
used from that command, as well as the name that
&man.groff.1; will use for references to this font. For
example, assuming you used the first
- <command>tiff2pf.ps</command> command above, then the 3of9
+ <command>tiff2pf.ps</command> above, then the 3of9
Barcode font can be created using the command:</para>
<screen><prompt>%</prompt> <userinput>afmtodit -d DESC -e text.enc 3of9.afm generate/textmap 3of9</userinput></screen>
-
+
<para>Ensure that the resulting
<replaceable>PS_font_name</replaceable> file (e.g.,
<filename>3of9</filename> in the example above) is located
@@ -817,7 +846,7 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
<para>Note that if <filename>ttf2pf.ps</filename> assigns a
font name using the one it finds in the TrueType font file
and you want to use a different name, you must edit the
- <filename>.afm</filename> file prior to running
+ <filename>.afm</filename> prior to running
<command>afmtodit</command>. This name must also match the
one used in the Fontmap file if you wish to pipe
&man.groff.1; into &man.gs.1;.</para>
@@ -826,7 +855,7 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="truetype-for-other-programs">
- <title>Can TrueType fonts be used with other programs?</title>
+ <title>Can TrueType Fonts be Used with Other Programs?</title>
<para>The TrueType font format is used by Windows, Windows 95, and
Mac's. It is quite popular and there are a great number of
@@ -834,38 +863,43 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
<para>Unfortunately, there are few applications that I am aware of
that can use this format: <application>Ghostscript</application>
- and <application>Povray</application> come to mind.
- <application>Ghostscript's</application> support, according to the documentation, is
- rudimentary and the results are likely to be inferior to type 1
- fonts. <application>Povray</application> version 3 also has the ability to use TrueType
- fonts, but I rather doubt many people will be creating documents
- as a series of raytraced pages :-).</para>
-
- <para>This rather dismal situation may soon change. The <link xlink:href="http://www.freetype.org/">FreeType Project</link> is
- currently developing a useful set of FreeType tools:</para>
+ and <application>Povray</application> come to mind.
+ <application>Ghostscript's</application> support, according to
+ the documentation, is rudimentary and the results are likely to
+ be inferior to type 1 fonts. <application>Povray</application>
+ version 3 also has the ability to use TrueType fonts, but I
+ rather doubt many people will be creating documents as a series
+ of raytraced pages :-).</para>
+
+ <para>This rather dismal situation may soon change. The <link
+ xlink:href="http://www.freetype.org/">FreeType Project</link>
+ is currently developing a useful set of FreeType tools:</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
- <para>The <command>xfsft</command> font server for <application>X11</application> can
- serve TrueType fonts in addition to regular fonts. Though
- currently in beta, it is said to be quite usable. See
- <link xlink:href="http://www.dcs.ed.ac.uk/home/jec/programs/xfsft/">Juliusz
- Chroboczek's page</link> for further information.
- Porting instructions for FreeBSD can be found at <link xlink:href="http://math.missouri.edu/~stephen/software/">Stephen
+ <para>The <command>xfsft</command> font server for
+ <application>X11</application> can serve TrueType fonts in
+ addition to regular fonts. Though currently in beta, it is
+ said to be quite usable. See <link
+ xlink:href="http://www.dcs.ed.ac.uk/home/jec/programs/xfsft/">Juliusz
+ Chroboczek's page</link> for further information. Porting
+ instructions for FreeBSD can be found at <link
+ xlink:href="http://math.missouri.edu/~stephen/software/">Stephen
Montgomery's software page</link>.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para><application>xfstt</application> is another font server for
- <application>X11</application>,
- available under <uri xlink:href=" ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/X11/fonts/"> ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/X11/fonts/</uri>.</para>
+ <para><application>xfstt</application> is another font server
+ for <application>X11</application>, available under <uri
+ xlink:href="ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/X11/fonts/">ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/X11/fonts/</uri>.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>A program called <command>ttf2bdf</command> can produce
BDF files suitable for use in an X environment from TrueType
- files. Linux binaries are said to be available from <uri xlink:href="ftp://crl.nmsu.edu/CLR/multiling/General/">ftp://crl.nmsu.edu/CLR/multiling/General/</uri>.</para>
+ files. Linux binaries are said to be available from <uri
+ xlink:href="ftp://crl.nmsu.edu/CLR/multiling/General/">ftp://crl.nmsu.edu/CLR/multiling/General/</uri>.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@@ -875,7 +909,7 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="obtaining-additional-fonts">
- <title>Where can additional fonts be obtained?</title>
+ <title>Where Can Additional Fonts be Obtained?</title>
<para>Many fonts are available on the Internet. They are either
entirely free, or are share-ware. In addition many fonts are
@@ -884,7 +918,7 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
</sect1>
<sect1 xml:id="additional-questions">
- <title>Additional questions</title>
+ <title>Additional Questions</title>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
@@ -892,14 +926,15 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para>Can one generate the <filename>.afm</filename> file from
+ <para>Can one generate the <filename>.afm</filename> from
a <filename>.pfa</filename> or
<filename>.pfb</filename>?</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para>How to generate the <application>groff</application> character mapping files for
- PostScript fonts with non-standard character names?</para>
+ <para>How to generate the <application>groff</application>
+ character mapping files for PostScript fonts with
+ non-standard character names?</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@@ -909,7 +944,8 @@ Converting 3of9.ttf to A.pfa and B.afm.</screen>
<listitem>
<para>It would be good to have examples of using TrueType
- fonts with <application>Povray</application> and <application>Ghostscript</application>.</para>
+ fonts with <application>Povray</application> and
+ <application>Ghostscript</application>.</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</sect1>