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authorChern Lee <chern@FreeBSD.org>2001-09-12 20:26:59 +0000
committerChern Lee <chern@FreeBSD.org>2001-09-12 20:26:59 +0000
commit996f2dca7223a8912c87727b1f7d402129c07373 (patch)
tree06ebbefec4a358c0797ec519646f588fd2b6916d /en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/multimedia/chapter.sgml
parentf9141908fa35470297b1801610f6b585dc2340ac (diff)
downloaddoc-996f2dca7223a8912c87727b1f7d402129c07373.tar.gz
doc-996f2dca7223a8912c87727b1f7d402129c07373.zip
Add a section on MP3s in Sound:
* MP3 Players * Encoding MP3s * Ripping CD Audio * Decoding MP3s Remove comment from sypnosis and update.
Notes
Notes: svn path=/head/; revision=10667
Diffstat (limited to 'en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/multimedia/chapter.sgml')
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1 files changed, 211 insertions, 3 deletions
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/multimedia/chapter.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/multimedia/chapter.sgml
index 5ceb0bf41c..0f46d6bc9d 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/multimedia/chapter.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/multimedia/chapter.sgml
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
<!--
The FreeBSD Documentation Project
- $FreeBSD: doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/sound/chapter.sgml,v 1.15 2001/08/16 18:35:08 chern Exp $
+ $FreeBSD: doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/sound/chapter.sgml,v 1.16 2001/08/22 05:37:50 murray Exp $
-->
<chapter id="sound">
@@ -29,8 +29,6 @@
applications allowing you to edit your recorded audio, add sound
effects, and control attached MIDI devices.</para>
-<!-- XXX we need to talk about ripping MP3s here. -->
-
<para>After reading this chapter you will know:</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>How to locate your sound card.</para></listitem>
@@ -39,6 +37,8 @@
<listitem><para>Methods to test that your card is working using
sample applications.</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>How to troubleshoot your sound setup.</para></listitem>
+ <listitem><para>How to playback and encode MP3s.</para></listitem>
+ <listitem><para>How to rip CD audio tracks into data files.</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
<para>Before reading this chapter you should:</para>
@@ -365,4 +365,212 @@ pcm0: &lt;Aureal Vortex 8830&gt; at memory 0xfeb40000 irq 5 (4p/1r +channels dup
</qandaentry>
</qandaset>
</sect1>
+
+ <sect1 id="mp3">
+ <sect1info>
+ <authorgroup>
+ <author>
+ <firstname>Chern</firstname>
+ <surname>Lee</surname>
+ <contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
+ </author>
+ </authorgroup>
+ <!-- 11 Sept 2001 -->
+ </sect1info>
+
+ <title>MP3 Audio</title>
+
+ <para>MP3 (MPEG Layer 3 Audio) accomplishes near CD-quality sound,
+ leaving no reason to let your FreeBSD workstation fall short of
+ its offerings.</para>
+
+ <sect2 id="mp3-players">
+ <title>MP3 Players</title>
+
+ <para>By far, the most popular XFree86 MP3 player is
+ <application>XMMS</application> (X Multimedia System). Winamp
+ skins can be used with <application>XMMS</application> since the
+ GUI is almost identical to that of Nullsoft Winamp's.
+ <application>XMMS</application> also has native plug-in
+ support.</para>
+
+ <para><application>XMMS</application> can be installed from the
+ <port>audio/xmms</port> port or package.</para>
+
+ <para><application>XMMS'</application> interface is intuitive, with
+ a playlist, graphic equalizer, and more. Those familiar with WinAmp
+ will find <application>XMMS</application> simple to use.</para>
+
+ <para>The <port>audio/mpg123</port> port is an alternative,
+ command-line MP3 player.</para>
+
+ <para><application>mpg123</application> can be run by specifying the
+ sound device and the MP3 file on the command line, as shown below:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; mpg123 -a <replaceable>/dev/dsp1.0</replaceable> Foobar-GreatestHits.mp3
+High Performance MPEG 1.0/2.0/2.5 Audio Player for Layer 1, 2 and 3.
+Version 0.59r (1999/Jun/15). Written and copyrights by Michael Hipp.
+Uses code from various people. See 'README' for more!
+THIS SOFTWARE COMES WITH ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY! USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!
+
+
+
+
+
+Playing MPEG stream from BT - Foobar-GreastHits.mp3 ...
+MPEG 1.0 layer III, 128 kbit/s, 44100 Hz joint-stereo
+</screen>
+
+ <para><literal>/dev/dsp1.0</literal> should be replaced with the
+ <devicename>dsp</devicename> device entry on your system.</para>
+
+ </sect2>
+
+ <sect2 id="rip-cd">
+ <title>Ripping CD Audio Tracks</title>
+
+ <para>Before encoding a CD or CD track to MP3, the audio data on
+ the CD must be ripped onto the hard drive. This is done by
+ copying the raw CDDA (CD Digital Audio) data to WAV
+ files.</para>
+
+ <para>The <command>cdda2wav</command> tool, which is a part of the
+ <port>sysutils/cdrtools</port> suite, is used for ripping audio
+ information of CDs and the information associated with it.</para>
+
+ <para>With the audio CD in the drive, the following command
+ can be issued (as <username>root</username>) to rip an entire
+ CD into individual (per track) WAV files:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; cdda2wav -D <replaceable>0,1,0</replaceable> -B</screen>
+
+ <para>The <option>-D <replaceable>0,1,0</replaceable></option>
+ indicates the SCSI device <devicename>0,1,0</devicename>, which
+ corresponds to the output of <command>cdrecord
+ -scanbus</command>.</para>
+
+ <para>To rip individual tracks, make use of the
+ <option>-t</option> option as shown:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; cdda2wav -D <replaceable>0,1,0</replaceable> -t 7</screen>
+
+ <para>This example rips track seven of the audio CDROM. To rip a range
+ of tracks, for example, track one to seven, specify a range:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; cdda2wav -D <replaceable>0,1,0</replaceable> -t 1+7</screen>
+
+ <para><application>cdda2wav</application> only supports SCSI
+ CDROM drives. For IDE drives, try out <port>audio/cdd</port> or
+ some of the various other utilities in the audio ports
+ collection.</para>
+
+ </sect2>
+
+ <sect2 id="mp3-encoding">
+ <title>Encoding MP3s</title>
+
+ <para>Nowadays, the mp3 encoder of choice is
+ <application>lame</application>.
+ <application>Lame</application> can be found at
+ <port>audio/lame</port> in the ports tree.</para>
+
+ <para>Using the ripped WAV files, the following command will
+ convert <filename>audio01.wav</filename> to
+ <filename>audio01.mp3</filename>:</para>
+
+ <screen>&prompt.root; lame -h -b <replaceable>128</replaceable> \
+--tt "<replaceable>Foo Song Title</replaceable>" \
+--ta "<replaceable>FooBar Artist</replaceable>" \
+--tl "<replaceable>FooBar Album</replaceable>" \
+--ty "<replaceable>2001</replaceable>" \
+--tc "<replaceable>Ripped and encoded by Foo</replaceable>" \
+--tg "<replaceable>Genre</replaceable>" \
+<replaceable>audio01.wav audio01.mp3</replaceable></screen>
+
+ <para>128 kbits seems to be the standard MP3 bitrate in use.
+ Many enjoy the higher quality 160, or 192. The higher the
+ bitrate, the more disk space the resulting MP3 will consume--but
+ the quality will be higher. The <option>-h</option> option
+ turns on the <quote>higher quality but a little slower</quote>
+ mode. The options beginning with <option>--t</option> indicate
+ ID3 tags, which usually contain song information, to be embedded
+ within the MP3 file. Additional encoding options can be found
+ by consulting the lame man page.</para>
+ </sect2>
+
+ <sect2 id="mp3-decoding">
+ <title>Decoding MP3s</title>
+
+ <para>In order to burn an audio CD from MP3s, they must be converted
+ to a non-compressed WAV format. Both <application>XMMS</application>
+ and <application>mpg123</application> support the output of MP3 to
+ an uncompressed file format.</para>
+
+ <para>Writing to Disk in <application>XMMS</application>:</para>
+
+ <procedure>
+ <step>
+ <para>Launch <application>XMMS</application>.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Right-click on the window to bring up the
+ <application>XMMS</application> menu.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Select <literal>Preference</literal> under
+ <literal>Options</literal>.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Change the Output Plugin to <quote>Disk Writer
+ Plugin</quote>.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Press <literal>Configure</literal>.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Enter (or choose browse) a directory to write the
+ uncompressed files to.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Load the MP3 file into <application>XMMS</application>
+ as usual, with volume at 100% and EQ settings turned
+ off.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Press <literal>Play</literal> &mdash; <application>XMMS</application>
+ will appear as if it is playing the MP3, but no music will be heard. It
+ is actually playing the MP3 to a file.</para>
+ </step>
+
+ <step>
+ <para>Be sure to set the default Output Plugin back to what it was before
+ in order to listen to MP3s again.</para>
+ </step>
+ </procedure>
+
+ <para>Writing to stdout in <application>mpg123</application>:</para>
+
+ <procedure>
+ <step>
+ <para>Run mpg123 -s <replaceable>audio01.mp3</replaceable>
+ &gt; audio01.pcm</para>
+ </step>
+ </procedure>
+
+ <para><application>XMMS</application> writes a file in the WAV format, while
+ <application>mpg123</application> converts the MP3 into raw PCM audio data.
+ Both of these formats can be used with <application>cdrecord</application>
+ or <application>burncd</application> to create audio CDROMs.</para>
+
+ <para>Read <xref linkend="creating-cds"> for more information on using a
+ CD burner in FreeBSD.</para>
+ </sect2>
+ </sect1>
</chapter>