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authorNik Clayton <nik@FreeBSD.org>2000-04-30 22:18:21 +0000
committerNik Clayton <nik@FreeBSD.org>2000-04-30 22:18:21 +0000
commit60d6d8089288f683363055dc1f5483ad69e8cf78 (patch)
tree487b205c547c9b9e43f8b19c3936ec657eb9f023 /en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer
parent5eda1065fcffff303c61d5f903bbea61c2c39907 (diff)
downloaddoc-60d6d8089288f683363055dc1f5483ad69e8cf78.tar.gz
doc-60d6d8089288f683363055dc1f5483ad69e8cf78.zip
Added ids to various chapters, and replaced "See Chapter <n>" in the text
with lots of <xref linkend="...">. Note that the PPP examples have moved to /usr/share/examples/ppp. Indent the example ppp.conf file properly. Talk about the relationship between /etc/rc.conf and /etc/defaults/rc.conf. PR: docs/18115 Submitted by: john@t-f-i.freeserve.co.uk Update the path to the NT hosts file. Submitted by: Brian Wilson <bwilson@powerinter.net>
Notes
Notes: svn path=/head/; revision=7121
Diffstat (limited to 'en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer')
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer/book.sgml163
1 files changed, 76 insertions, 87 deletions
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer/book.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer/book.sgml
index e7c17f6767..102c33bafc 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer/book.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/ppp-primer/book.sgml
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@
</author>
</authorgroup>
-<pubdate>$FreeBSD: doc/en_US.ISO_8859-1/tutorials/ppp/ppp.sgml,v 1.8 1999/09/06 07:22:25 peter Exp $</pubdate>
+<pubdate>$FreeBSD: doc/en_US.ISO_8859-1/books/ppp-primer/book.sgml,v 1.2 1999/09/17 23:43:40 nik Exp $</pubdate>
<abstract><para>This is a step-by-step guide for configuring FreeBSD systems to act as
a dial-up router/gateway in a Local Area Environment. All entries may
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@ PPP will be addressed in Section 2, "Configuring the FreeBSD System".</para>
</sect1>
</chapter>
-<chapter>
+<chapter id="system-config">
<title>FreeBSD System Configuration</title>
<para>There are three basic pieces of information that must be known to
@@ -203,9 +203,8 @@ the following command at a prompt:</para>
<para>The name of the host FreeBSD system will be displayed on a single
line. If the name looks correct (this is very subjective :-) skip
-ahead to Section 3.2, "Verifying the Ethernet Interface
-Configuration".</para>
-
+ahead to <xref linkend="verify-ether-if-config">.</para>
+
<para>For example, in our sample network, we would see 'curly.my.domain'
as a result of the `hostname` command if the name had been set
correctly during, or after, installation. (At this point, don't worry
@@ -263,7 +262,7 @@ specify "save changes" when prompted.</para>
</sect2>
</sect1>
-<sect1>
+<sect1 id="verify-ether-if-config">
<title>Verifying the Ethernet Interface Configuration</title>
<para>To reiterate our basic assumption, this guide assumes that the
@@ -355,11 +354,9 @@ indicators are:
then the Ethernet card hasn't been configured yet.</para>
<para>If the configuration for the Ethernet interface is correct you can
-skip forward to Section 3.4, "Creating the list of other LAN hosts".
-Otherwise, proceed with the next section.</para>
-
-
-<sect2>
+skip forward to <xref linkend="list-lan-hosts">.</para>
+
+<sect2 >
<title>Configuring your Ethernet Interface</title>
<para><emphasis><emphasis remap=bf>Reminder: You must be logged in as 'root' to edit the
@@ -471,40 +468,26 @@ known as gateway functions) are disabled.</para>
<para>If your intent is to use a FreeBSD system as stand-alone Internet
workstation and not as a gateway between LAN nodes and your ISP you
-should skip forward to Section 3.4, "Creating the List of Other
-LAN Hosts".</para>
+should skip forward to <xref linkend="list-lan-hosts">.</para>
<para>If you intend for the PPP program to service the local FreeBSD box
as well as LAN workstations (as a router) you'll need to enable IP
forwarding.</para>
<para>To enable IP Packet forwarding you'll need to edit the
-<filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename> file.
-Load this file into your editor with the following command:
-<informalexample>
-<screen># ee /etc/rc.conf</screen>
-</informalexample>
-</para>
-
-<para>About 85 lines down from the top of the file will be the
-configuration
-section which controls IP forwarding, which will look like:
-<informalexample>
-<screen>=====
-gateway_enable="NO" # Set to YES if this host will be a gateway.
-=====</screen>
-</informalexample>
-</para>
-
-<para>Change this line to read:
-<informalexample>
-<screen>=====
-gateway_enable="YES" # Set to YES if this host will be a gateway.
-=====</screen>
-</informalexample>
-</para>
-
-<para>and exit the editor (saving the changes!).</para>
+<filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename> file.</para>
+
+ <para>This file contains overrides of the defaults in
+ <filename>/etc/defaults/rc.conf</filename>. The default gateway
+ setting is controlled by the line</para>
+
+ <programlisting>gateway_enable="NO"</programlisting>
+
+ <para>in that file. To override it, add a line like</para>
+
+ <programlisting>gateway_enable="YES"</programlisting>
+
+ <para><filename>/etc/rc.conf</filename>.</para>
<para><emphasis><emphasis remap=bf>NOTE: This line may already be set to
'<literal>gateway_enable="YES"</literal>' if IP forwarding was enabled when the
@@ -512,7 +495,7 @@ FreeBSD system was installed.</emphasis></emphasis></para>
</sect1>
-<sect1>
+<sect1 id="list-lan-hosts">
<title>Creating the List of other LAN Hosts(<filename>/etc/hosts</filename>)</title>
<para>The final step in configuring the LAN side of the FreeBSD system is
@@ -523,9 +506,10 @@ stored in the '<filename>/etc/hosts</filename>' file.</para>
<para>The default version of this file has only a single host name
listing in it: the name and address of the loopback device ('lo0').
By networking convention, this device is always named "localhost" and
-always has an IP address of 127.0.0.1. (See the interface
-configuration example in Section 3.2.)</para>
-
+always has an IP address of 127.0.0.1. <xref
+ linkend="verify-ether-if-config">.</para>
+
+
<para>To edit the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file enter the following command:
<informalexample>
<screen> # ee /etc/hosts </screen>
@@ -632,12 +616,12 @@ names (loopback and curly) correctly correlate to their IP addresses
<filename>/etc/hosts</filename> files is correct.</para>
<para>If the IP address for "curly" isn't 192.168.1.1 or the address for
-"localhost" isn't 127.0.0.1, return to Section 3.4 and review your
+"localhost" isn't 127.0.0.1, return to <xref linkend="list-lan-hosts"> and review your
entries in '<filename>/etc/hosts</filename>'.</para>
<para>If the names and addresses are indicated correctly in the result of
the ping command but there are errors displayed then something is
-amiss with the interface configuration(s). Return to Section 3.1 and
+amiss with the interface configuration(s). Return to <xref linkend="system-config"> and
verify everything again.</para>
<para>If everything here checks out, proceed with the next section.</para>
@@ -685,6 +669,12 @@ with emphasis on configuring your `ppp` environment to operate in
<sect1>
<title>Backing up the original PPP configuration files</title>
+ <note>
+ <para>More recent versions of FreeBSD have the examples files in
+ <filename>/usr/share/examples/ppp</filename>, so this step may not
+ be necessary.</para>
+ </note>
+
<para>Before making any changes to the files which are used by PPP you
should make a copy of the default files that were created when the
FreeBSD system was installed.</para>
@@ -749,23 +739,22 @@ dial-out connection working.</para>
<para>Below is the /etc/ppp/ppp.conf file that we'll be using to provide a
dial-out Internet gateway for our example LAN:
-<informalexample>
-<screen>################################################################
+<programlisting>
+################################################################
# PPP Configuration File ('/etc/ppp/ppp.conf')
#
# Default settings; These are always executed always when PPP
# is invoked and apply to all system configurations.
################################################################
default:
-set device /dev/cuaa0
-set speed 57600
-disable pred1
-deny pred1
-disable lqr
-deny lqr
-set dial "ABORT BUSY ABORT NO\\sCARRIER TIMEOUT 5 \"\" ATE1Q0M0
-OK-AT-OK\\dATDT\\T TIMEOUT 40 CONNECT"
-set redial 3 10
+ set device /dev/cuaa0
+ set speed 57600
+ disable pred1
+ deny pred1
+ disable lqr
+ deny lqr
+ set dial "ABORT BUSY ABORT NO\\sCARRIER TIMEOUT 5 \"\" ATE1Q0M0 OK-AT-OK\\dATDT\\T TIMEOUT 40 CONNECT"
+ set redial 3 10
#
#
################################################################
@@ -776,12 +765,12 @@ set redial 3 10
#
################################################################
interactive:
-set authname Your_User_ID_On_Remote_System
-set authkey Your_Password_On_Remote_System
-set phone 1-800-123-4567
-set timeout 300
-set openmode active
-accept chap
+ set authname Your_User_ID_On_Remote_System
+ set authkey Your_Password_On_Remote_System
+ set phone 1-800-123-4567
+ set timeout 300
+ set openmode active
+ accept chap
#
################################################################
#
@@ -791,17 +780,17 @@ accept chap
#
################################################################
demand:
-set authname Your_User_ID_On_Remote_System
-set authkey Your_Password_On_Remote_System
-set phone 1-800-123-4567
-set timeout 300
-set openmode active
-accept chap
-set ifaddr 127.1.1.1/0 127.2.2.2/0 255.255.255.0
-add 0 0 127.2.2.2
+ set authname Your_User_ID_On_Remote_System
+ set authkey Your_Password_On_Remote_System
+ set phone 1-800-123-4567
+ set timeout 300
+ set openmode active
+ accept chap
+ set ifaddr 127.1.1.1/0 127.2.2.2/0 255.255.255.0
+ add 0 0 127.2.2.2
################################################################
-# End of /etc/ppp/ppp.conf</screen>
-</informalexample>
+# End of /etc/ppp/ppp.conf
+</programlisting>
This file, taken verbatim from a working system, has three relevant
configuration sections:</para>
@@ -1067,12 +1056,12 @@ should immediately attempt to negotiate the connection. Some remote
sites do this automatically, some don't. This instructs your side of
the link to take the initiative and try to set up the connection.</para>
-<para>
-<informalexample>
+
+
<screen>accept chap</screen>
-</informalexample>
-This tells the PPP program to use the "Challenge-Handshake
+
+<para>This tells the PPP program to use the "Challenge-Handshake
Authentication Protocol" to authenticate you. The values exchanged
between the local and remote side for UserID and password are taken
from the 'authname' and 'authkey' entries above.</para>
@@ -1091,7 +1080,7 @@ the "default" section included automatically.</para>
the configuration section which defines the "interactive"
configuration.</para>
-<para>As noted in Paragraph ???, the examples cited in this section of
+<para>As noted earlier, the examples cited in this section of
the guide presume that you'll be connecting to a remote system that
understands how to use the CHAP protocol to set up the connection.</para>
@@ -1161,8 +1150,8 @@ from the 'authname' and 'authkey' entries above.</para>
<para>This command sets up a pair of "fake" IP addresses for the local and
remote sides of the PPP link. It instructs the PPP program to create
an IP address of 127.1.1.1 for the local side of the '<emphasis remap=tt>tun0</emphasis>'
-(tunnel) device (refer back to section ?? for a description of this
-device) and 127.2.2.2 for the remote side. Appending '<filename>/0</filename>' to
+(tunnel) device
+and 127.2.2.2 for the remote side. Appending '<filename>/0</filename>' to
each address tells the PPP program that zero of the bits that make up
these addresses are significant and can (in fact, must!) be negotiated
between the local and remote systems when the link is established.
@@ -1325,7 +1314,7 @@ connection.</para>
<para>If your sole objective in reading this guide is to connect your
FreeBSD box to the Internet using dial-out ppp you can proceed to
-Section 6, "Testing the Network".</para>
+<xref linkend="testing-the-network">.</para>
<para>One very attractive feature of the PPP program in on-demand mode is
its ability to route IP traffic between other systems on the Local
@@ -1364,13 +1353,13 @@ Internet, one of the following command lines would be used instead:</para>
<para>You can alternatively use the command <emphasis remap=tt>``alias enable yes''</emphasis>
in your ppp configuration file (refer to the man page for details).</para>
-<para>Keep this in mind if you intend to proceed with Section 5,
-"Configuring Windows Systems".</para>
+<para>Keep this in mind if you intend to proceed with <xref
+ linkend="config-window-system">.</para>
</sect1>
</chapter>
-<chapter>
+<chapter id="config-window-system">
<title>Configuring Windows Systems</title>
<para>As indicated in Section 1, our example network consists of a
@@ -1395,7 +1384,7 @@ the ISP. Perform the following steps:</para>
<para>In order to connect to the other TCP/IP systems on the LAN you'll
need to create an identical copy of the "hosts" file that you
-installed on the FreeBSD system in Section 3.4.
+installed on the FreeBSD system in <xref linkend="list-lan-hosts">.
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
@@ -1405,7 +1394,7 @@ installed on the FreeBSD system in Section 3.4.
<listitem>
<para>In the editor, enter the addresses and system names from the hosts
-file shown in Section 3.4.</para>
+file shown in <xref linkend="list-lan-hosts">.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
@@ -1595,7 +1584,7 @@ installed on the FreeBSD system in Section 3.4
<listitem>
<para>Click the "Start" button; select "Run..."; enter "notepad
-\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\DRIVERS\ETC\HOSTS" (without the quotes) and click
+\WINNT\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\ETC\HOSTS" (without the quotes) and click
"OK"</para>
</listitem>
@@ -1931,7 +1920,7 @@ necessary to add all of the addresses that your ISP provided.</para>
</sect1>
</chapter>
-<chapter>
+<chapter id="testing-the-network">
<title>Testing the Network</title>
<para> Once you've completed that appropriate tasks above you should have