aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiff
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
-rw-r--r--handbook/handbook.sgml4
-rw-r--r--handbook/install.sgml643
2 files changed, 361 insertions, 286 deletions
diff --git a/handbook/handbook.sgml b/handbook/handbook.sgml
index 6c8d9f0c60..8317c19bd7 100644
--- a/handbook/handbook.sgml
+++ b/handbook/handbook.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: handbook.sgml,v 1.7.4.4 1995-10-26 21:40:20 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: handbook.sgml,v 1.7.4.5 1995-10-30 17:48:17 jfieber Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!DOCTYPE linuxdoc PUBLIC "-//FreeBSD//DTD linuxdoc//EN" [
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@
<author>
<name>The FreeBSD Documentation Project</name>
</author>
- <date>October 26, 1995</date>
+ <date>October 30, 1995</date>
<abstract>Welcome to FreeBSD! This handbook covers the
installation and day to day use of <bf>FreeBSD Release
diff --git a/handbook/install.sgml b/handbook/install.sgml
index f7e027f5a7..0f5d4ac35e 100644
--- a/handbook/install.sgml
+++ b/handbook/install.sgml
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-<!-- $Id: install.sgml,v 1.9.2.4 1995-10-30 16:18:52 jfieber Exp $ -->
+<!-- $Id: install.sgml,v 1.9.2.5 1995-10-30 17:48:19 jfieber Exp $ -->
<!-- The FreeBSD Documentation Project -->
<!--
@@ -54,8 +54,7 @@
<item>If you are using MS-DOS download
<url
url="ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/tools/dos-tools/rawrite.exe"
- name="rawrite.exe"> (tell your browser to <em>save</em> rather than
- <em>display</em>!), then run it:
+ name="rawrite.exe">, then run it:
<tscreen><verb>
C:\> rawrite
</verb></tscreen> The
@@ -66,12 +65,12 @@ C:\> rawrite
<item>If you are using a UNIX system:
<tscreen>
-% dd if=boot.flp of=<em>disk&lowbar;device</em> bs=18k
+% dd if=boot.flp of=<em>disk&lowbar;device</em>
</tscreen>
where <em>disk&lowbar;device</em> is the <tt>/dev</tt>
entry for the floppy drive. On FreeBSD systems, this
- is <tt>/dev/rfd0</tt> for the A: drive and
- <tt>/dev/rfd1</tt> for the B: drive.
+ is <tt>/dev/fd0</tt> for the A: drive and
+ <tt>/dev/fd1</tt> for the B: drive.
</item>
</itemize>
@@ -148,73 +147,6 @@ Boot:
name="Kernel configuration"> for more information on
creating custom kernels.
- <sect><heading>MS-DOS user's Questions and Answers</heading>
-
- <p>Many FreeBSD users wish to install FreeBSD on PCs inhabited
- by MS-DOS. Here are some commonly asked questions about
- installing FreeBSD on such systems.
-
- <p><bf>Help! I have no space! Do I need to delete
- everything first?</bf>
-
- If your machine is already running MS-DOS and has little
- or no free space available for FreeBSD's installation,
- all is not lost! You may find the FIPS utility, provided
- in the <tt>tools</tt> directory on the FreeBSD CDROM or
- on the various FreeBSD ftp sites, to be quite useful.
-
- FIPS allows you to split an existing MS-DOS partition
- into two pieces, preserving the original partition and
- allowing you to install onto the second free piece. You
- first defragment your MS-DOS partition, using the DOS
- 6.xx DEFRAG utility or the Norton Disk tools, then run
- FIPS. It will prompt you for the rest of the information
- it needs. Afterwards, you can reboot and install FreeBSD
- on the new free slice. See the <em>Distributions</em>
- menu for an estimation of how much free space you'll need
- for the kind of installation you want.
-
-
- <bf>Can I use compressed MS-DOS filesystems from
- FreeBSD?</bf>
-
- No. If you are using a utility such as Stacker(tm) or
- DoubleSpace(tm), FreeBSD will only be able to use
- whatever portion of the filesystem you leave
- uncompressed. The rest of the filesystem will show up as
- one large file (the stacked/dblspaced file!). <bf>Do not
- remove that file!</bf> You will probably regret it
- greatly!
-
- It is probably better to create another uncompressed
- MS-DOS primary partition and use this for communications
- between MS-DOS and FreeBSD.
-
-
-<!-- XXX Status???
- <bf>Can I mount my MS-DOS extended partitions?</bf>
-
- This feature isn't in FreeBSD 2.0.5 but should be in 2.1.
- We've laid all the groundwork for making this happen, now
- we just need to do the last 1 percent of the work involved.
--->
-
- <bf>Can I run MS-DOS binaries under FreeBSD?</bf>
-
- Not yet! We'd like to add support for this someday, but
- are still lacking anyone to actually do the work.
- Ongoing work with Linux's DOSEMU utility may bring this
- much closer to being a reality sometime soon. Send mail
- to hackers@freebsd.org if you're interested in joining
- this effort!
-
- However, there's a nice application available in the
- <ref id="ports" name="The Ports Collection"> called pcemu,
- that allows you to run many basic MS-DOS text-mode binaries
- by entirely emulating an 8088 CPU.
-
-
-
<sect><heading>Supported Configurations<label id="install:hw"></heading>
<p>FreeBSD currently runs on a wide variety of ISA, VLB,
@@ -398,41 +330,72 @@ Boot:
There is not a lot of preparatory work that needs to be
done to successfully install from one of Walnut Creek's
FreeBSD CDROMs (other CDROM distributions may work as
- well, but I can't say for sure as I have no hand or say
- in their creation). You can either boot into the CD
- installation directly from MS-DOS using Walnut Creek's
- supplied "install" batch file or you can make a boot
- floppy by writing the supplied image
- (floppies/boot.flp) onto a floppy with the "go"
- command, which invokes the rawrite.exe command found in
- the tools/ subdirectory.
-
- If you're creating the boot floppy from a UNIX machine,
- you may find that ``dd if=floppies/boot.flp
- of=/dev/rfd0'' or ``dd if=floppies/boot.flp
- of=/dev/floppy'' works well, depending on your hardware
- and operating system environment.
-
- Once you've booted from MS-DOS or floppy, you should be
- able to select CDROM as the media type in the Media
+ well, we simply cannot say as we have no hand or say in
+ their creation). You can either boot into the CD
+ installation directly from DOS using Walnut Creek's
+ supplied ``install.bat'' batch file or you can make a
+ boot floppy with the ``makeflp.bat'' command.
+
+ For the easiest interface of all (from DOS), type
+ ``view''. This will bring up a DOS menu utility that
+ leads you through all the available options.
+
+ If you are creating the boot floppy from a UNIX machine,
+ see <ref id="install" name="the beginning of this
+ guide"> for examples. of how to create the boot floppy.
+
+ Once you have booted from DOS or floppy, you should then
+ be able to select CDROM as the media type in the Media
menu and load the entire distribution from CDROM. No
other types of installation media should be required.
After your system is fully installed and you have
rebooted from the hard disk, you should find the CD
- mounted on the directory /cdrom. A utility called
- `lndir' comes with the XFree86 distribution which you
- may also find useful: It allows you to create "link
- tree" directories to things on Read-Only media like
- CDROM. One example might be something like this:
- <tscreen>mkdir /usr/ports<newline>lndir /cdrom/ports
- /usr/ports</tscreen>
+ mounted on the directory <bf>/cdrom</bf>. A utility
+ called `lndir' comes with the XFree86 distribution
+ which you may also find useful: It allows you to create
+ "link tree" directories to things on Read-Only media
+ like CDROM. One example might be something like this:
+
+<tscreen><verb>
+mkdir /usr/ports
+lndir /cdrom/ports /usr/ports
+</verb></tscreen>
+
+ Which would allow you to then ``cd /usr/ports; make''
+ and get all the sources from the CD, but yet create all
+ the intermediate files in <bf>/usr/ports</bf>, which is
+ presumably on a more writable media.
+
+ This is, in fact, what the Ports entry in the
+ Configuration menu does at installation time if you
+ select it.
+
+ <quote><bf>Special note:</bf> Before invoking the
+ installation, be sure that the CDROM is in the drive
+ so that the install probe can find it. This is also
+ true if you wish the CDROM to be added to the default
+ system configuration automatically during the install
+ (whether or not you actually use it as the
+ installation media). <!-- XXX This will be fixed for
+ 2.1, but for now this simple work-around will ensure
+ that your CDROM is detected properly. --></quote>
+
+ Finally, if you would like people to be able to FTP
+ install FreeBSD directly from the CDROM in your
+ machine, you will find it quite easy. After the machine
+ is fully installed, you simply need to add the
+ following line to the password file (using the vipw
+ command):
- Which would allow you to then "cd /usr/ports; make" and
- get all the sources from the CD, but yet create all the
- intermediate files in /usr/ports, which is presumably
- on a more writable media!
+<tscreen><verb>
+ftp:*:99:99::0:0:FTP:/cdrom:/nonexistent
+</verb></tscreen>
+ No further work is necessary. The other installers
+ will now be able to chose a Media type of FTP and type
+ in: <tt>ftp://<em>your machine</em></tt> after picking ``Other''
+ in the ftp sites menu.
<sect1><heading>Before installing from Floppy</heading>
@@ -441,41 +404,43 @@ Boot:
things the hard way, you must first prepare some
floppies for the install.
- The first floppy you'll need is ``floppies/root.flp'',
- which is somewhat special in that it's not a MS-DOS
- filesystem floppy at all, but rather an "image" floppy
- (it's actually a gzip'd cpio file). You can use the
- rawrite.exe program to do this under DOS, or ``dd'' to
- do it on a UNIX Workstation (see notes in section 2.1
- concerning the ``floppies/boot.flp'' image). Once this
- floppy is made, put it aside. You'll be asked for it
- later.
-
- You will also need, at minimum, as many 1.44MB or 1.2MB
+ The first floppy you will need is ``floppies/root.flp'',
+ which is somewhat special in that it is not a DOS
+ filesystem floppy at all, but rather an ``image''
+ floppy (it is actually a gzip'd cpio file). You can use
+ the rawrite.exe program to do this under DOS, or dd to
+ do it on a UNIX Workstation. See <ref id="install"
+ name="the beginning of this guide"> for examples. of
+ how to create the boot floppy. Once this floppy is
+ made, go on to make the distribution set floppies:
+
+ You will need, at minimum, as many 1.44MB or 1.2MB
floppies as it takes to hold all files in the bin
- (binary distribution) directory. THESE floppies <bf>must</bf>
- be formatted using MS-DOS, using with the FORMAT
- command in MS-DOS or the File Manager format command in
- Microsoft Windows(tm). Factory preformatted floppies
- will also work well, provided that they haven't been
- previously used for something else. Note that only media
- without any defects are usable for these floppies; there
- is no kind of bad sector remapping available for them.
+ (binary distribution) directory. These floppies
+ <em>must</em> be formatted using MS-DOS, using the
+ FORMAT command in MS-DOS or the File Manager format
+ command in Microsoft Windows(tm). Do <em>not</em>
+ trust Factory Preformatted floppies. Format them again
+ yourself, just to make sure.
Many problems reported by our users in the past have
resulted from the use of improperly formatted media, so
we simply take special care to mention it here!
- After you've MS-DOS formatted the floppies, you'll need
- to copy the files onto them. The distribution files
- are split into chunks conveniently sized so that 5 of
- them will fit on a conventional 1.44MB floppy. Go
+ After you have DOS formatted the floppies, you will
+ need to copy the files onto them. The distribution
+ files are split into chunks conveniently sized so that
+ 5 of them will fit on a conventional 1.44MB floppy. Go
through all your floppies, packing as many files as
- will fit on each one, until you've got all the
- distributions you want packed up in this fashion.
- Select ``Floppy'' from the Media menu at installation
- time and you will be prompted for everything after
- that.
+ will fit on each one, until you have got all the
+ distributions you want packed up in this fashion. Each
+ distribution should go into a subdirectory on the
+ floppy, e.g.: <bf>a:&bsol;bin&bsol;bin.aa</bf>,
+ <bf>a:&bsol;bin&bsol;bin.ab</bf>, and so on.
+
+ Once you come to the Media screen of the install,
+ select ``Floppy'' and you will be prompted for the rest.
+
<sect1><heading>Before installing from a MS-DOS partition<label id="install:msdos"></heading>
@@ -489,8 +454,8 @@ Boot:
FreeBSD:
<tscreen><verb>
C> MD C:\FREEBSD
-C> XCOPY /S E:\FLOPPIES C:\FREEBSD\FLOPPIES\
C> XCOPY /S E:\DISTS\BIN C:\FREEBSD\BIN\
+C> XCOPY /S E:\FLOPPIES C:\FREEBSD\FLOPPIES\
</verb></tscreen>
assuming that <tt>C:</tt> is where you have free space
and <tt>E:</tt> is where your CDROM is mounted. Note
@@ -516,26 +481,31 @@ C> XCOPY /S E:\DISTS C:\FREEBSD\
short of an on-line install using FTP or a CDROM
install. The installation program expects the files to
be simply tar'ed onto the tape, so after getting all of
- the files for distribution you're interested in, simply
+ the files for distribution you are interested in, simply
tar them onto the tape with a command like:
<tscreen>
- cd /freebsd/distdir<newline>
- tar cvf /dev/rwt0 (or /dev/rst0) dist1 .. dist2
- </tscreen>
+cd /freebsd/distdir<newline>
+tar cvf /dev/rwt0 (or /dev/rst0) dist1 .. dist2
+</tscreen>
Make sure that the `floppies/' directory is one of the
- "dists" given above, since the installation will look
+ ``dists'' given above, since the installation will look
for `floppies/root.flp' on the tape.
When you go to do the installation, you should also
make sure that you leave enough room in some temporary
- directory (which you'll be allowed to choose) to
- accommodate the FULL contents of the tape you've
+ directory (which you will be allowed to choose) to
+ accommodate the <bf>full</bf> contents of the tape you have
created. Due to the non-random access nature of tapes,
this method of installation requires quite a bit of
- temporary storage! You should expect to require as
+ temporary storage. You should expect to require as
much temporary storage as you have stuff written on
tape.
+ <quote><bf>Note:</bf> When going to do the
+ installation, the tape must be in the drive
+ <em>before</em> booting from the boot floppy. The
+ installation probe may otherwise fail to find it.</quote>
+
<sect1><heading>Before installing over a network</heading>
@@ -548,68 +518,69 @@ C> XCOPY /S E:\DISTS C:\FREEBSD\
standard ethernet controller (includes some PCMCIA).
</descrip>
- SLIP support is rather primitive, and limited primarily
- to hard-wired links, such as a serial cable running
- between a laptop computer and another computer. The link
- should be hard-wired as the SLIP installation doesn't
- currently offer a dialing capability; that facility is
- provided with the PPP utility, which should be used in
- preference to SLIP whenever possible.
-
- If you're using a modem, then PPP is almost certainly
- your only choice. Make sure that you have your service
- provider's information handy as you'll need to know it
- fairly soon in the installation process. You will need
- to know, at the minimum, your service provider's IP
- address and possibly your own (though you can also leave
- it blank and allow PPP to negotiate it with your ISP).
- You also need to know how to use the various "AT
- commands" to dial the ISP with your particular modem as
- the PPP dialer provides only a very simple terminal
- emulator.
-
- If a hard-wired connection to another FreeBSD (2.0R or
- later) machine is available, you might also consider
- installing over a "laplink" parallel port cable. The
- data rate over the parallel port is much higher than is
- what's typically possible over a serial line (up to
- 50k/sec), thus resulting in a quicker installation.
-
- Finally, for the fastest possible network installation,
- an ethernet adaptor is always a good choice! FreeBSD
- supports most common PC ethernet cards, a table of
- supported cards (and their required settings) provided as
- part of the FreeBSD Hardware Guide - see the
- Documentation menu on the boot floppy. If you are using
- one of the supported PCMCIA ethernet cards, also be sure
- that it's plugged in _before_ the laptop is powered on!
- FreeBSD does not, unfortunately, currently support "hot
- insertion" of PCMCIA cards.
-
- You will also need to know your IP address on the
- network, the "netmask" value for your address class and
- the name of your machine. Your system administrator can
- tell you which values to use for your particular network
- setup. If you will be referring to other hosts by name
- rather than IP address, you'll also need a name server
- and possibly the address of a gateway (if you're using
- PPP, it's your provider's IP address) to use in talking
- to it. If you do not know the answers to all or most of
- these questions, then you should really probably talk to
- your system administrator _first_ before trying this type
- of installation!
-
- Once you have a network link of some sort working, the
- installation can continue over NFS or FTP.
+ SLIP support is rather primitive, and limited primarily
+ to hard-wired links, such as a serial cable running
+ between a laptop computer and another computer. The
+ link should be hard-wired as the SLIP installation
+ does not currently offer a dialing capability; that
+ facility is provided with the PPP utility, which should
+ be used in preference to SLIP whenever possible.
+
+ If you are using a modem, then PPP is almost certainly
+ your only choice. Make sure that you have your service
+ provider's information handy as you will need to know it
+ fairly soon in the installation process. You will need
+ to know, at the minimum, your service provider's IP
+ address and possibly your own (though you can also
+ leave it blank and allow PPP to negotiate it with your
+ ISP). You also need to know how to use the various ``AT
+ commands'' to dial the ISP with your particular modem as
+ the PPP dialer provides only a very simple terminal
+ emulator.
+
+ If a hard-wired connection to another FreeBSD (2.0R or
+ later) machine is available, you might also consider
+ installing over a ``laplink'' parallel port cable. The
+ data rate over the parallel port is much higher than
+ what is typically possible over a serial line (up to
+ 50k/sec), thus resulting in a quicker installation.
+
+ Finally, for the fastest possible network installation,
+ an ethernet adaptor is always a good choice! FreeBSD
+ supports most common PC ethernet cards, a table of
+ supported cards (and their required settings) is
+ provided in <ref id="install:hw" name="Supported
+ Hardware">. If you are using one of the supported
+ PCMCIA ethernet cards, also be sure that it is plugged
+ in <em>before</em> the laptop is powered on! FreeBSD
+ does not, unfortunately, currently support hot
+ insertion of PCMCIA cards.
+
+ You will also need to know your IP address on the
+ network, the netmask value for your address class,
+ and the name of your machine. Your system
+ administrator can tell you which values to use for your
+ particular network setup. If you will be referring to
+ other hosts by name rather than IP address, you will also
+ need a name server and possibly the address of a
+ gateway (if you are using PPP, it is your provider's IP
+ address) to use in talking to it. If you do not know
+ the answers to all or most of these questions, then you
+ should really probably talk to your system
+ administrator <em>first</em> before trying this type of
+ installation.
+
+ Once you have a network link of some sort working, the
+ installation can continue over NFS or FTP.
<sect2><heading>Preparing for NFS installation</heading>
<p>NFS installation is fairly straight-forward: Simply
- copy the FreeBSD distribution files you're interested
- onto a server somewhere and then point the NFS media
+ copy the FreeBSD distribution files you want onto a
+ server somewhere and then point the NFS media
selection at it.
- If this server supports only "privileged port" access
+ If this server supports only ``privileged port'' access
(as is generally the default for Sun workstations),
you will need to set this option in the Options menu
before installation can proceed.
@@ -619,27 +590,26 @@ C> XCOPY /S E:\DISTS C:\FREEBSD\
wish to toggle the appropriate Options flag.
In order for NFS installation to work, the server
- must support "subdir mounts", e.g. if your FreeBSD
+ must support subdir mounts, e.g., if your FreeBSD
2.1 distribution directory lives on:
- ziggy:/usr/archive/stuff/FreeBSD Then ziggy will have
+ <bf>ziggy:/usr/archive/stuff/FreeBSD</bf> Then ziggy will have
to allow the direct mounting of
- /usr/archive/stuff/FreeBSD, not just /usr or
- /usr/archive/stuff.
+ <bf>/usr/archive/stuff/FreeBSD</bf>, not just <bf>/usr</bf> or
+ <bf>/usr/archive/stuff</bf>.
- In FreeBSD's /etc/exports file, this is controlled by
- the ``-alldirs'' option. Other NFS servers may have
+ In FreeBSD's <bf>/etc/exports</bf> file, this is controlled by
+ the ``<tt>-alldirs</tt>'' option. Other NFS servers may have
different conventions. If you are getting
`Permission Denied' messages from the server then
- it's likely that you don't have this enabled
- properly!
-
+ it is likely that you do not have this enabled
+ properly.
<sect2><heading>Preparing for FTP Installation</heading>
<p>FTP installation may be done from any mirror site
containing a reasonably up-to-date version of FreeBSD
- 2.1, a full menu of reasonable choices from almost
- anywhere in the world being provided by the FTP site
+ 2.1. A full menu of reasonable choices from almost
+ anywhere in the world is provided by the FTP site
menu.
If you are installing from some other FTP site not
@@ -648,98 +618,131 @@ C> XCOPY /S E:\DISTS C:\FREEBSD\
also specify your own URL by selecting the ``Other''
choice in that menu. A URL can also be a direct IP
address, so the following would work in the absence
- of a name server: <tscreen>
- ftp://192.216.222.4/pub/FreeBSD/2.1-RELEASE</tscreen>
+ of a name server:
+
+<tscreen><verb>
+ftp://192.216.222.4/pub/FreeBSD/2.1-RELEASE
+</verb></tscreen>
- If you are installing through a firewall then you
- should probably select ``Passive mode'' ftp, which is
- the default. If you are talking to a server which
- does not support passive mode for some reason, see
- the Options menu to select Active mode transfers.
+ There are two FTP installation modes you can use:
+
+ <descrip>
+ <tag>FTP Active</tag>
+
+ For all FTP transfers, use ``Active'' mode. This
+ will not work through firewalls, but will often
+ work with older ftp servers that do not support
+ passive mode. If your connection hangs with
+ passive mode (the default), try active!
+
+ <tag>FTP Passive</tag>
+
+ For all FTP transfers, use ``Passive'' mode. This
+ allows the user to pass through firewalls that do
+ not allow incoming connections on random port
+ addresses.
+ </descrip>
+
+ <quote><bf>Note:</bf> ACTIVE AND PASSIVE MODES ARE
+ NOT THE SAME AS A `PROXY' CONNECTION, WHERE A PROXY
+ FTP SERVER IS LISTENING ON A DIFFERENT PORT!</quote>
+
+ In such instances, you should specify the URL as something like:
+<tscreen><verb>
+ftp://foo.bar.com:1234/pub/FreeBSD
+</verb></tscreen>
+
+ Where ``1234'' is the port number of the proxy ftp server.
<sect><heading>Installing FreeBSD</heading>
- <p>Once you've taken note of the appropriate
+ <p>Once you have taken note of the appropriate
preinstallation steps, you should be able to install
FreeBSD without any further trouble.
Should this not be true, then you may wish to go back and
- re-read the relevant preparation section (section 2.x)
- for the installation media type you're trying to use -
- perhaps there's a helpful hint there that you missed the
- first time? If you're having hardware trouble, or
+ re-read the relevant preparation section above
+ for the installation media type you are trying to use,
+ perhaps there is a helpful hint there that you missed the
+ first time? If you are having hardware trouble, or
FreeBSD refuses to boot at all, read the Hardware Guide
provided on the boot floppy for a list of possible
solutions.
The FreeBSD boot floppy contains all the on-line
documentation you should need to be able to navigate
- through an installation and if it doesn't then I'd like
- to know what you found most confusing! It is the
- objective of the FreeBSD installation program
- (sysinstall) to be self-documenting enough that painful
- "step-by-step" guides are no longer necessary. It may
- take us a little while to reach that objective, but
- that's the objective!
-
- Meanwhile, you may also find the following "typical
- installation sequence" to be helpful:
+ through an installation and if it does not then we would
+ like to know what you found most confusing. Send your
+ comments to <htmlurl url="mailto:doc@freebsd.org"
+ name="doc@freebsd.org">. It is the objective of the
+ FreeBSD installation program (sysinstall) to be
+ self-documenting enough that painful ``step-by-step''
+ guides are no longer necessary. It may take us a little
+ while to reach that objective, but that is the objective!
+
+ Meanwhile, you may also find the following ``typical
+ installation sequence'' to be helpful:
<enum>
-
<item>Boot the boot floppy. After a boot sequence
which can take anywhere from from 30 seconds to 3
minutes, depending on your hardware, you should be
presented with a menu of initial choices. If the
- floppy doesn't boot at all, or the boot hangs at some
+ floppy does not boot at all, or the boot hangs at some
stage, go read the Q&amp;A section of the Hardware Guide
for possible causes.
<item>Press F1. You should see some basic usage
instructions on the menu system and general
- navigation. If you haven't used this menu system
+ navigation. If you have not used this menu system
before then PLEASE read this thoroughly!
- <item>If English is not your native language, you may
- wish to proceed directly to the Language option and
- set your preferred language. This will bring up some
- of the documentation in that language instead of
- English.
-
<item>Select the Options item and set any special
preferences you may have.
- <item>Select Proceed, bringing you to the Installation Menu.
-
+ <item>Select a Custom or Express install, depending on
+ whether or not you would like the installation to give
+ you a high degree of control over each step of the
+ installation or simply lead you through it, chosing
+ reasonable defaults when possible. See details on
+ both installation types below.
+
+ <item>The Configure menu choice allows you to furthur
+ configure your FreeBSD installation by giving you
+ menu-driven access to various system defaults. Some
+ items, like networking, may be especially important
+ if you did a CDROM/Tape/Floppy installation and have
+ not yet configured your network interfaces (assuming
+ you have any). Properly configuring such interfaces
+ here will allow FreeBSD to come up on the network
+ when you first reboot from the hard disk.
</enum>
- <sect1><heading>The installation menu</heading>
+ <sect1><heading>Express installation</heading>
- <p>You can do anything you like in this menu without
- altering your system <em>except</em> for "Commit",
- which will perform any requests to alter your system
- you may have made.
-
- If you're confused at any point, the F1 key usually
- pulls up the right information for the screen you're
- in.
+ <p>The express installation is not too much different than
+ the Custom one except that it leads you through the
+ required stages in the proper order and presents you
+ with various helpful prompts along the way.
<enum>
-
- <item>The first step is generally `Partition', which
+ <item>The first step is the `Partition Editor', which
allows you to chose how your drives will be used
- for FreeBSD.
+ for FreeBSD. If you are dedicating an entire drive
+ to FreeBSD, the `A' command is probably all you
+ need to type here.
- <item>Next, with the `Label' editor, you can specify
+ <item>Next, with the `Label Editor', you can specify
how the space in any allocated FreeBSD partitions
should be used by FreeBSD, or where to mount a
- non-FreeBSD partition (such as DOS).
+ non-FreeBSD partition (such as DOS). If you want
+ the standard layout, simply type `A' here.
<item>Next, the `Distributions' menu allows you to
specify which parts of FreeBSD you wish to load. A
- good choice is "User" for a small system or
- "Developer" for someone wanting a bit more out of
+ good choice is ``User'' for a small system or
+ ``Developer'' for someone wanting a bit more out of
FreeBSD. If none of the existing collections sound
applicable, select Custom.
@@ -747,43 +750,115 @@ C> XCOPY /S E:\DISTS C:\FREEBSD\
what kind of media you wish to install from. If a
desired media choice is found and configured
automatically then this menu will simply return,
- otherwise you'll be asked for additional details on
+ otherwise you will be asked for additional details on
the media device type.
- <item>Finally, the Commit command will actually
- perform all the actions at once (nothing has been
- written to your disk so far, nor will it until you
- give the final confirmation). All new or changed
- partition information will be written out, file
- systems will be created and/or non-destructively
- labelled (depending on how you set their newfs
- flags in the Label editor) and all selected
- distributions will be extracted.
-
- <item>The Configure menu choice allows you to further
- configure your FreeBSD installation by giving you
- menu-driven access to various system defaults.
- Some items, like networking, may be especially
- important if you did a CDROM/Tape/Floppy
- installation and have not yet configured your
- network interfaces (assuming you have some).
- Properly configuring your network here will allow
- FreeBSD to come up on the network when you first
- reboot from the hard disk.
-
- <item>Exit returns you to the top menu.
-
+ <item>Finally, you will be prompted to commit all of
+ these actions at once (nothing has been written to
+ your disk so far, nor will it until you give the
+ final confirmation). All new or changed partition
+ information will be written out, file systems will
+ be created and/or non-destructively labelled
+ (depending on how you set their newfs flags in the
+ Label Editor) and all selected distributions will
+ be extracted.
</enum>
- At this point, you're generally done with the
+ At this point, you are generally done with the
sysinstall utility and can select the final `Quit'. If
- you're running it as an installer (e.g. before the
+ you are running it as an installer (e.g., before the
system is all the way up) then the system will now
- reboot. If you selected the boot manager option, you
- will see a small boot menu with an `F?' prompt. Press
- the function key for BSD (it will be shown) and you
- should boot up into FreeBSD off the hard disk.
+ reboot after you press return one last time. If you
+ selected the boot manager option, you will see a small
+ boot menu with an `F?' prompt. Press the function key
+ for BSD (it will be shown) and you should boot up into
+ FreeBSD off the hard disk.
If this fails to happen for some reason, see the Q&amp;A
section of the Hardware Guide for possible clues!
+ <sect1><heading>Custom installation</heading>
+
+ <p>You can do anything you like in this menu without
+ altering your system <em>except</em> for ``Commit'',
+ which will perform any requests to alter your system
+ you may have made. Some of the menu options will also
+ have direct `Write' commands available for commiting an
+ operation immediately, but they should only be used if
+ you are absolutely sure it is necessary. It is generally
+ better to make your changes and then commit them all at
+ once so that you are left with the option of changing
+ your mind up to the very last minute.
+
+ If you are confused at any point, the F1 key usually
+ pulls up the right information for the screen you are
+ in.
+
+
+ <sect><heading>MS-DOS user's Questions and Answers</heading>
+
+ <p>Many FreeBSD users wish to install FreeBSD on PCs inhabited
+ by MS-DOS. Here are some commonly asked questions about
+ installing FreeBSD on such systems.
+
+ <p><bf>Help! I have no space! Do I need to delete
+ everything first?</bf>
+
+ If your machine is already running MS-DOS and has little
+ or no free space available for FreeBSD's installation,
+ all is not lost! You may find the FIPS utility, provided
+ in the <tt>tools</tt> directory on the FreeBSD CDROM or
+ on the various FreeBSD ftp sites, to be quite useful.
+
+ FIPS allows you to split an existing MS-DOS partition
+ into two pieces, preserving the original partition and
+ allowing you to install onto the second free piece. You
+ first defragment your MS-DOS partition, using the DOS
+ 6.xx DEFRAG utility or the Norton Disk tools, then run
+ FIPS. It will prompt you for the rest of the information
+ it needs. Afterwards, you can reboot and install FreeBSD
+ on the new free slice. See the <em>Distributions</em>
+ menu for an estimation of how much free space you will need
+ for the kind of installation you want.
+
+
+ <bf>Can I use compressed MS-DOS filesystems from
+ FreeBSD?</bf>
+
+ No. If you are using a utility such as Stacker(tm) or
+ DoubleSpace(tm), FreeBSD will only be able to use
+ whatever portion of the filesystem you leave
+ uncompressed. The rest of the filesystem will show up as
+ one large file (the stacked/dblspaced file!). <bf>Do not
+ remove that file!</bf> You will probably regret it
+ greatly!
+
+ It is probably better to create another uncompressed
+ MS-DOS primary partition and use this for communications
+ between MS-DOS and FreeBSD.
+
+
+<!-- XXX Status???
+ <bf>Can I mount my MS-DOS extended partitions?</bf>
+
+ This feature is not in FreeBSD 2.0.5 but should be in 2.1.
+ We have laid all the groundwork for making this happen, now
+ we just need to do the last 1 percent of the work involved.
+-->
+
+ <bf>Can I run MS-DOS binaries under FreeBSD?</bf>
+
+ Not yet! We would like to add support for this someday, but
+ are still lacking anyone to actually do the work.
+ Ongoing work with Linux's DOSEMU utility may bring this
+ much closer to being a reality sometime soon. Send mail
+ to hackers@freebsd.org if you're interested in joining
+ this effort!
+
+ However, there is a nice application available in the
+ <ref id="ports" name="The Ports Collection"> called pcemu,
+ that allows you to run many basic MS-DOS text-mode binaries
+ by entirely emulating an 8088 CPU.
+
+
+