aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiff
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv340
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/nycbsdcon/dixon-bsdisdying.sbv116
2 files changed, 225 insertions, 231 deletions
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv
index 1bba30ffdc..f4af5c5cd5 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
0:00:09.649,0:00:15.249
Fortunately my slide will be centered, because
-I'll have to change resolutions, I think this works out..
+I'll have to change resolutions. I think this works out...
0:00:15.249,0:00:19.310
And, it's about protecting your privacy with FreeBSD and Tor
@@ -9,10 +9,10 @@ And, it's about protecting your privacy with FreeBSD and Tor
and, uh...
0:00:20.859,0:00:21.480
-Privacy
+Privacy.
0:00:21.480,0:00:25.859
-what I mean here is mostly anonymity
+What I mean here is mostly anonymity
0:00:25.859,0:00:28.889
but there are some other aspects that
@@ -27,10 +27,10 @@ uh, so...
I want to first talk about who needs anonimity anyway
0:00:39.500,0:00:42.880
-is it just for criminals or some other bad guys, right?
+Is it just for criminals or some other bad guys, right?
0:00:42.880,0:00:44.209
-after this
+After this
0:00:44.209,0:00:50.940
anonymization concepts, then Tor. Tor's a, well, a tool
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ you have to take care of
when you want to be anonymous on the Web or the Internet
0:01:06.070,0:01:06.650
-and uh,
+And uh,
0:01:06.650,0:01:12.280
if time permits I'd like to do a little demonstration
@@ -79,16 +79,16 @@ Thailand last year
when the military coup was going on
0:01:32.510,0:01:38.150
-and the journalists in Thailand couldn't really uh,
+and the journalists in Thailand couldn't really uh
0:01:38.150,0:01:39.830
-journalists couldn't really, uh
+Journalists couldn't really, uh
0:01:39.830,0:01:43.050
get the information they needed to do their work
0:01:43.050,0:01:45.750
-also, uh, informants
+Also, uh, informants
0:01:45.750,0:01:49.100
whistleblowers... people who want to tell you about
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ corruption going on in governments and companies
and don't want to lose their job for it... Dissidents
0:01:56.460,0:01:58.250
-uh, best case
+Uh, best case
0:01:58.250,0:02:01.610
when in Myanmar
@@ -109,19 +109,19 @@ when in Myanmar
last few weeks ago
0:02:03.750,0:02:05.290
-when the
+When the
0:02:05.290,0:02:07.649
all the Buddhists monks were going to the streets and uh,
0:02:07.649,0:02:09.879
-the Internet was totally censored
+the Internet was heavily censored
0:02:09.879,0:02:14.899
-it was really dangerous to do anything on the Internet
+It was really dangerous to do anything on the Internet
0:02:14.899,0:02:17.719
-so, so umm
+So, so umm
0:02:17.719,0:02:20.489
socialy sensitive information, like when you want to uh,
@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@ know who you are
as it will be very embarrassing
0:02:31.840,0:02:33.779
-also Law Enforcement, ah
+Also Law Enforcement, ah
0:02:33.779,0:02:38.579
for example, uh, when you want to set up a
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ for example, uh, when you want to set up a
an anonymous tipline for crime reporting
0:02:41.669,0:02:45.810
-and uh, also companies that want to, uh
+And uh, also companies that want to, uh
0:02:45.810,0:02:48.079
research competition, as one case that, uh
@@ -192,7 +192,7 @@ driving forces behind the
anonymization research.
0:03:24.319,0:03:26.169
-and maybe you
+And maybe you
0:03:26.169,0:03:28.799
may have heard of the European Union
@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ may have heard of the European Union
Data Retention Directive?
0:03:30.349,0:03:33.039
-where, umm
+Where, umm
0:03:33.039,0:03:35.739
collection data gets stored
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ Two weeks back this was, uh,
the law was passed in Germany
0:03:47.729,0:03:48.900
-so, uh
+So, uh
0:03:48.900,0:03:50.450
from first January on,
@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ email, or the dial-in data needs to be stored
by providers for six months
0:04:00.449,0:04:02.510
-and, uh,
+And, uh,
0:04:02.510,0:04:05.379
sooner or later it's going to be in Poland as well
@@ -244,16 +244,16 @@ sooner or later it's going to be in Poland as well
[talking]
0:04:07.689,0:04:14.689
-well, you're part of the Euro Union now, so ah, welcome!
+Well, you're part of the Euro Union now, so ah, welcome!
0:04:16.989,0:04:18.529
-okay, uh
+Okay, uh
0:04:18.529,0:04:21.220
that's a
0:04:21.220,0:04:27.110
-maybe you want to hide what interests you have and uh,
+Maybe you want to hide what interests you have and uh,
who you talk to, I mean uh,
0:04:27.110,0:04:30.889
@@ -267,15 +267,15 @@ talking to
if they bother to find out
0:04:37.780,0:04:40.709
-yeah, and also
+Yeah, and also
0:04:40.709,0:04:46.279
-criminals, but um, they already do illegal stuff and they
+criminals, but they already do illegal stuff and they
don't care about
0:04:46.279,0:04:51.629
doing more illegal stuff to stay anonymous, right? They can
-uh, steal people's identities, they can rent botnets or
+steal people's identities, they can rent botnets or
create them in the first place
0:04:51.629,0:04:53.829
@@ -289,7 +289,7 @@ crack one of the thousands of Windows computers online,
no big deal
0:04:59.689,0:05:02.029
-so, uh
+So, uh
0:05:02.029,0:05:05.199
Criminals already do this and uh,
@@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ you can't really
stay anonymous on your own
0:05:25.930,0:05:28.999
-you needs the help of more people
+you need the help of more people
0:05:28.999,0:05:30.559
and uh,
@@ -339,12 +339,8 @@ Ok, so on to talking about two
0:05:40.979,0:05:42.949
anonymization concepts
-0:05:42.949,0:05:44.539
-uh huh
-
0:05:44.539,0:05:51.539
Proxy? Everyone here probably knows how a proxy works,
-uh yeah
0:05:52.559,0:05:53.169
LANs connect to the proxy and request
@@ -355,14 +351,8 @@ a website or whatever and the proxy
0:05:57.290,0:06:00.359
just passes it on and pass through
-0:06:00.359,0:06:03.789
-right
-
-0:06:03.789,0:06:04.680
-um
-
0:06:04.680,0:06:09.329
-Proxys are fast and simple but it's a single point of
+Proxys are fast and simple but it's really a single point of
failure, like uh,
0:06:09.329,0:06:13.139
@@ -379,52 +369,52 @@ get a subpoena or
break into the computer room or whatever
0:06:22.440,0:06:26.400
-it's pretty easy
+It's pretty easy
0:06:26.400,0:06:30.050
-Second anonymization concept is mixed,
+Second anonymization concept is MIX,
0:06:30.050,0:06:32.549
it's really old from nineteen eighty one
0:06:32.549,0:06:35.099
-so you can see, uh,
+So you can see, uh,
0:06:35.099,0:06:41.150
how long the research in this area is going on
0:06:41.150,0:06:43.150
-the mix is kind of similar to a proxy
+The MIX is kind of similar to a proxy
0:06:43.150,0:06:47.090
-like, trying to connect to it to send the messages
+Like, trying to connect to it to send the messages
0:06:47.090,0:06:50.779
-and the mix collects them
+and the MIX collects them
0:06:50.779,0:06:54.550
-and no less than um
+and coalesces them
0:06:54.550,0:06:56.699
-it puts them all
+Like, it puts them all
0:06:56.699,0:06:58.319
-in through different coincides and uhm,
+into coming sites and uhm,
0:06:58.319,0:07:00.169
you see here it
0:07:00.169,0:07:03.849
-shuffles them and waits
+shuffles them. It waits
0:07:03.849,0:07:08.930
-til there's enough data in it and just
+until there's enough data in it and just
0:07:08.930,0:07:11.039
-shoves them and sends them back out so
+shuffles them and sends them back out so
0:07:11.039,0:07:18.039
-um, this is to protect against correlation effects.
+um, this is to protect against correlation attacks.
0:07:20.219,0:07:22.439
But second in...
@@ -433,22 +423,22 @@ But second in...
Oh yeah, and
0:07:23.379,0:07:27.879
-when you actually put several mixes uh
+when you actually put several MIXes uh
0:07:27.879,0:07:31.259
-behind them; it's a mixed escape and uh,
+behind them; it's a MIX cascade and uh,
0:07:31.259,0:07:32.149
between mixes is also
0:07:32.149,0:07:35.330
-a friction going on, uh, the first
+encryption going on, uh, the first
0:07:35.330,0:07:38.349
-or the client which is
+or the client which
0:07:38.349,0:07:44.069
-you could see here if this lights would be centered, uh,
+you could see here if the slides would be centered, uh,
0:07:44.069,0:07:46.029
what else gets the
@@ -515,10 +505,10 @@ like web routing for example
but what's good about it it's uh
0:08:47.060,0:08:50.500
-distrinuted trust uh,
+distributed trust uh,
0:08:50.500,0:08:54.940
-just one these mixes has to be secure to actually
+just one these MIXes has to be secure to actually
0:08:54.940,0:08:56.840
anonymize the whole connection
@@ -542,13 +532,13 @@ It's a concept that is actually built on
both these concepts
0:09:17.720,0:09:21.340
-mixes and proxies.
+MIXes and proxies.
0:09:21.340,0:09:22.770
It's a TCP-Overlay network,
0:09:22.770,0:09:24.900
-means you can, uh
+that means you can, uh
0:09:24.900,0:09:25.560
channel any
@@ -560,29 +550,29 @@ TCP connection through it
theoretically
0:09:28.480,0:09:31.310
-uh, theoretically I will explain
+Uh, theoretically I will explain
0:09:31.310,0:09:33.790
a couple of slides later
0:09:33.790,0:09:37.040
-it provides a SOCKS interface so you don't need any uh,
+It provides a SOCKS interface so you don't need any uh,
0:09:37.040,0:09:42.060
special application proxies like any application that uses
-SOCKS interface can just,
+SOCKS interface can just
0:09:42.060,0:09:43.370
-talk to talk
+talk to Tor
0:09:43.370,0:09:48.070
and it's available on, um, all major platforms
0:09:48.070,0:09:53.940
-what is uh, especially important is available in Windows
+What is uh, especially important it's available in Windows
0:09:53.940,0:09:55.850
-'cause, uhm, like I said earlier once
+Because, uhm, like I said earlier once
0:09:55.850,0:09:57.740
you want a really diverse,
@@ -606,7 +596,7 @@ Um, well it aims to uhm
combine the positive attributes of
0:10:15.939,0:10:17.480
-proxies and mixes
+proxies and MIXes
0:10:17.480,0:10:18.749
Like, proxies are fast, but
@@ -615,7 +605,7 @@ Like, proxies are fast, but
seem prone to failure
0:10:20.620,0:10:21.770
-and mixes
+and MIXes
0:10:21.770,0:10:24.590
distributed trust, you want to combine them
@@ -624,22 +614,22 @@ distributed trust, you want to combine them
so uh
0:10:29.930,0:10:31.310
-Fast, uh, Tor use not only public key
+Fast, uh, Tor uses not only public key
0:10:31.310,0:10:33.220
encryption but also session keys
0:10:33.220,0:10:35.170
-symmetrically encrypted.
+so it's symmetrically encrypted.
0:10:35.170,0:10:37.260
-so uh
+So uh
0:10:37.260,0:10:41.710
-All the connection set up is this public key so you just, uh
+all the connection set up is this public key so you just, uh
0:10:41.710,0:10:44.840
-authentication and stuff?
+authentication and stuff
0:10:44.840,0:10:50.860
And uh, the actual communication that's going on later
@@ -673,10 +663,10 @@ like dums want the user to actually have
to patch his PC off the Operating System or something
0:11:12.680,0:11:16.070
-just be in a... workable state really fast
+just be in a... workable state really fast.
0:11:16.070,0:11:19.340
-um, usability,
+Um, usability,
0:11:19.340,0:11:20.600
so you get the uh,
@@ -697,10 +687,10 @@ enable more research
in this whole area.
0:11:32.010,0:11:33.059
-so, uh
+So, uh
0:11:33.059,0:11:34.679
-the protocol to all users
+the protocol Tor users
0:11:34.679,0:11:37.890
should be really flexible
@@ -754,8 +744,8 @@ when she wants to talk to Jane
for example
0:12:30.380,0:12:34.280
-The first one is the entry node, middle LAN nodes, and the
-uh exit nodes, I will leave thes for later
+The first one is the entry node, middleman nodes, and the
+uh exit nodes, I will leave these for later
0:12:34.280,0:12:41.000
uh, so this
@@ -774,7 +764,8 @@ and they establish a session key and same
thing goes on
0:12:53.090,0:12:58.520
-in these two and these two so they can communicate later on
+between these two and these two so they can communicate
+later on
0:12:58.520,0:12:59.780
What's really important here
@@ -792,10 +783,10 @@ I will talk about it later
So it has to be unencrypted
0:13:06.610,0:13:13.610
-so you can get your request through
+so you can actually get your request through
0:13:20.690,0:13:22.700
-this is a virtual circuit
+This is a virtual circuit
0:13:22.700,0:13:24.490
that gets established and uh
@@ -810,10 +801,10 @@ ten minutes
a new circuit is built
0:13:32.450,0:13:37.250
-when a new website, when a new request come through, so uh
+when a new website, when a new request comes through, so uh
0:13:37.250,0:13:40.080
-this one stays, all these connections above stays
+this one stays, all these connections above stay
0:13:40.080,0:13:41.940
in this circuit
@@ -840,13 +831,13 @@ anonymity
in case one connection is compromised, for example.
0:14:00.220,0:14:01.600
-An these ten minutes
+And these ten minutes
0:14:01.600,0:14:04.490
-are really an arbitrary value
+are really an arbitrary value,
0:14:04.490,0:14:08.560
-,you can choose anything
+you can choose anything
0:14:08.560,0:14:10.660
you have to do the research
@@ -858,13 +849,13 @@ which value is best and so
ten minutes is compromised.
0:14:19.840,0:14:22.240
-With all you get exit policies,
+With Tor you get exit policies,
0:14:22.240,0:14:24.640
this is important for the exit node
0:14:24.640,0:14:27.880
-the one which actually send the uh,
+the one which actually sends the uh,
0:14:27.880,0:14:30.410
original request to the destination server
@@ -879,10 +870,10 @@ you can control which
TCP connections you want
0:14:34.220,0:14:39.180
-to allow from your node if you want
+to allow from your own node if you want
0:14:39.180,0:14:41.000
-that's default policy which uh
+As default policy which uh
0:14:41.000,0:14:43.610
blocks SMTP and NNTP to prevent uh
@@ -909,7 +900,7 @@ HTTP SSH
all the important stuff
0:15:01.630,0:15:05.250
-that you would want to minimize just works
+that you would want to anonymize just works
0:15:05.250,0:15:10.290
and uh, if you uh
@@ -918,7 +909,7 @@ and uh, if you uh
this is important for uh, if you
0:15:13.050,0:15:18.540
-want to run you node, uh
+want to run you own node, uh
0:15:18.540,0:15:19.220
waht kind of node you actually want to run
@@ -928,7 +919,7 @@ if you look at the picture, uh earlier
0:15:24.120,0:15:31.120
there's these three different nodes: entry node,
-middleman note, and exit node
+middleman node, and exit node
0:15:32.400,0:15:34.180
and uh, which node you want to run
@@ -967,7 +958,7 @@ administrator of the forum will see the IP address
of the
0:16:05.340,0:16:11.230
-exit node in his forum and not the one
+exit node in his logs and not the one
0:16:11.230,0:16:15.330
of Alice so uh he's going to have the problems later on
@@ -979,8 +970,8 @@ so I will talk about it later
but you have to keep this in mind
0:16:21.600,0:16:28.600
-and uh, keep up everything and uh we can play the role of
-entry nodes and middle man nodes
+And uh, keep up everything and uh we can play the role of
+entry nodes and middleman nodes
0:16:30.170,0:16:37.170
which is also important
@@ -995,7 +986,7 @@ these are services which can be
accessed
0:16:46.990,0:16:49.420
-without having an IP address
+without having the IP address of them
0:16:49.420,0:16:50.960
so uh
@@ -1004,17 +995,17 @@ so uh
you can't really find them physically
0:16:56.300,0:16:57.880
-so if you want to run a
+So if you want to run a
0:16:57.880,0:16:59.720
hidden service you can do it from anywhere
0:16:59.720,0:17:01.850
-do it from inside this private network here
+You can even do it from inside this private network here
0:17:01.850,0:17:05.950
-instead of a service and everyone in the outside world can
-actually access it
+You can set up a service and everyone in the outside world
+can actually access it
0:17:05.950,0:17:07.770
even if you don't have the rights to do
@@ -1029,13 +1020,13 @@ uh, this is really important to, uh
resist Denial of Service, for example
0:17:15.690,0:17:20.160
-'cause every uh,
+Because every uh,
0:17:20.160,0:17:20.519
every client that wants to
0:17:20.519,0:17:22.829
-access the service uh, gets
+access the service uh,
0:17:22.829,0:17:25.700
gets a different route in the network
@@ -1056,7 +1047,7 @@ resist censorship
And the addresses look like this:
0:17:38.510,0:17:43.280
-it's really a hash of a private key
+it's really a hash of a public key
0:17:43.280,0:17:47.340
and each hidden service is actually, well, identified
@@ -1065,7 +1056,7 @@ and each hidden service is actually, well, identified
by a public key
0:17:53.300,0:17:59.000
-this how it works, uhm, yet Alice the client
+This how it works, uhm, yet Alice the client
0:17:59.000,0:18:02.170
and the hidden server, Bob.
@@ -1090,14 +1081,14 @@ And Bob has the public key to identify the service,
and uh he sends
0:18:22.530,0:18:26.860
-this public key into each of these three introduction
+this public key and the list of three introduction
points to the directory server.
0:18:26.860,0:18:28.740
Now Alice wants to uh,
0:18:28.740,0:18:31.610
-connect to Bob, but first the first thing she does
+connect to Bob, the first the first thing she does
0:18:31.610,0:18:34.480
is download this
@@ -1109,7 +1100,7 @@ this list with the introduction points and the uh
public key from the directory server. After that, uh
0:18:50.120,0:18:54.299
-she choose one of the uh introduction points
+she chooses one of the uh introduction points
0:18:54.299,0:18:55.930
and uh,
@@ -1217,10 +1208,10 @@ then you have to give up your crypto keys
so they can decrypt it later
0:20:42.910,0:20:47.860
-and uh, yeah, it's not...
+and uh, yeah, it's not really great
0:20:47.860,0:20:50.010
-and it's actually last week was the first case
+and actually last week was the first case
0:20:50.010,0:20:52.890
when this was actually used in
@@ -1229,13 +1220,13 @@ when this was actually used in
Great Britain
0:20:56.600,0:21:00.720
-uh, there can be special laws like in Germany
+Uh, there can be special laws like in Germany
0:21:00.720,0:21:03.480
sort of like a hacker paragraph
0:21:03.480,0:21:06.990
-just a nickname, it has some cryptic legal name
+It's just a nickname, it has some cryptic legal name
0:21:06.990,0:21:07.940
uh, in reality
@@ -1274,7 +1265,7 @@ it could
restrict anything. From a map to a
0:21:36.669,0:21:39.210
-to God know what? Network tools.
+to God know what Network tools.
0:21:39.210,0:21:40.880
and uh
@@ -1303,7 +1294,7 @@ but no one really knows
and uh, the biggest Tor
0:22:00.990,0:22:02.250
-problems
+problem is
0:22:02.250,0:22:07.480
that, uh
@@ -1375,13 +1366,13 @@ and uh,
that's random stuff that can happen
0:22:55.530,0:22:56.540
-though, uh,
+So uh,
0:22:56.540,0:22:59.559
as an exit nodes provider you can get
0:22:59.559,0:23:03.690
-letters from Law Enforcement entities, and uh
+letters from Law Enforcement agencies, and uh
0:23:03.690,0:23:05.649
What are you doing there?
@@ -1393,7 +1384,7 @@ Maybe some illegal stuff?
And you have to explain to them that you are
0:23:10.040,0:23:12.260
-providing Tor server
+providing Tor server and
0:23:12.260,0:23:13.980
it wasn't you
@@ -1429,7 +1420,7 @@ Law Enforcement agencies, actually are, so so
depends on what kind of guy you're actually talking to
0:23:41.440,0:23:47.120
-So what's... what kind of role plays FreeBSD here?
+So what's... What kind of role plays FreeBSD here?
0:23:47.120,0:23:51.880
uh, FreeBSD is really well suited as a Tor node, uh
@@ -1445,7 +1436,7 @@ it doesn't matter what kind of system you use
and it shouldn't matter
0:23:59.150,0:24:00.830
-There's one of the, uh
+This is one of the, uh
0:24:00.830,0:24:03.130
like I said earlier one of the design
@@ -1463,7 +1454,7 @@ But if you're using the Tor
as actually uh,
0:24:14.290,0:24:17.320
-the security of other depends on your node
+the security of others depends on your node
0:24:17.320,0:24:20.690
and uh,
@@ -1493,7 +1484,7 @@ which is important, especialy the swap encryption. And uh,
there's also audit
0:24:39.390,0:24:40.740
-and the mac framework
+and the MAC framework
0:24:40.740,0:24:43.780
when you want to run your installation
@@ -1520,16 +1511,16 @@ And uh, probably the biggest feature:
Well maintained Tor-related ports.
0:25:04.060,0:25:07.390
-There is the main port, security Tor
+There is the main port, security/Tor
0:25:07.390,0:25:11.370
-Which is a client and server if you want to run
+Which is a client and server if you want to run
0:25:11.370,0:25:13.610
a network node, or just a client.
0:25:13.610,0:25:15.210
-There's Tor level
+There's tor-devel
0:25:15.210,0:25:16.450
and these are really up to date, uhm
@@ -1538,7 +1529,7 @@ and these are really up to date, uhm
Tor development happens really fast
0:25:22.830,0:25:23.710
-and ports get updated
+and the ports get updated
0:25:23.710,0:25:30.710
pretty soon after a release is made.
@@ -1549,7 +1540,7 @@ we'll use it later when we do the demonstration
0:25:41.320,0:25:44.310
And there's net management Vidalia which is a
-graphical content
+graphical frontend
0:25:44.310,0:25:47.200
also for Windows
@@ -1558,7 +1549,7 @@ also for Windows
and, uhm
0:25:48.260,0:25:53.929
-there's trans-proxy Tor
+there's trans-proxy-tor
0:25:53.929,0:25:58.650
which enables you to actually
@@ -1576,10 +1567,10 @@ that do stuff that's
that makes it hard for Tor to
0:26:07.510,0:26:08.860
-run with them
+anonymize them
0:26:08.860,0:26:10.810
-and you can use trans-proxy Tor
+and you can use trans-proxy-tor
0:26:10.810,0:26:15.510
to tunnel such connections through the Tor network.
@@ -1601,7 +1592,7 @@ Some applications just
bypass the configured proxy
0:26:30.500,0:26:34.500
-for example FireFox versions below version 1.5,
+for example Firefox versions below version 1.5,
0:26:34.500,0:26:35.700
which send every data,
@@ -1703,7 +1694,7 @@ out all the passwords.
And it's really surprising how many people uh, do this.
0:28:13.450,0:28:16.700
-So, lesson learned: use secure protocol.
+So, lesson learned: use secure protocols.
0:28:16.700,0:28:18.220
There are also other services that require
@@ -1742,13 +1733,14 @@ Uh, I've installed Tor and
Privoxy on this system
0:29:24.810,0:29:27.180
-the config files are on the usual places.
+Config files are on the usual places.
0:29:27.180,0:29:34.180
-And if you read this, this little.. small.. Is this alright?
+And if you read this, this little... small...
+Is this alright?
0:29:46.950,0:29:50.600
-So there is this Tor I see sample file
+So there is this torrc sample file
0:29:50.600,0:29:57.600
which we can use
@@ -1772,7 +1764,7 @@ there's this uh,
SOCKS port and SOCKS listen address information
0:30:24.220,0:30:31.220
-that's the
+that just
0:30:32.770,0:30:34.659
tells you where to connect your uh,
@@ -1818,7 +1810,7 @@ we need to tell
Privoxy uh,
0:31:33.809,0:31:40.809
-where to send connections requests.
+where to send connection requests.
0:31:51.740,0:31:53.659
Ok, I've actually entered this earlier
@@ -1839,19 +1831,19 @@ the uh, SOCKS client
So we just start
0:32:34.120,0:32:38.870
-Ok, so we all set
+Ok, so we are all set
0:32:38.870,0:32:40.480
Now we can just do
0:32:40.480,0:32:47.480
-everything with our brother
+everything with our browser
0:32:50.790,0:32:52.029
-we all started times
+Startup time sucks a bit
0:32:52.029,0:32:59.029
-a bit slow on my external drive
+because of my external drive
0:33:06.860,0:33:08.070
okay, uh
@@ -1863,7 +1855,7 @@ proxy settings
we just put in our Privoxy server
0:33:16.140,0:33:23.140
-which listens on port 3128, hopefully, or does it?
+which listens on port 3128, hopefully, or doesn't?
Oh, 8108, that's it.
0:33:47.360,0:33:49.060
@@ -1877,7 +1869,7 @@ through the Tor network
uhm, this is going to take a little bit,
0:33:58.880,0:34:01.950
-'cause all the route selection needs to be done
+Because all the route selection needs to be done
0:34:01.950,0:34:08.950
all the public crypto, there's also network latency
@@ -1904,7 +1896,7 @@ if you have a node that is running a modem then,
you'll have problem, it's really slow
0:34:36.099,0:34:42.989
-ok, while waiting
+Ok, while waiting
0:34:42.989,0:34:45.319
we can actually take a look
@@ -1913,7 +1905,7 @@ we can actually take a look
at how our hidden service is configured
0:34:59.699,0:35:03.369
-there's some lines for the Tor config file
+There's some lines for the Tor config file
0:35:03.369,0:35:07.439
the routing services
@@ -1927,7 +1919,7 @@ as I said, the hidden service is identified by a
public key, and uh, if you
0:35:19.369,0:35:22.159
-uncommand this sutff,
+uncomment this sutff,
0:35:22.159,0:35:24.999
and uh,
@@ -1964,14 +1956,14 @@ that an exit node
doesn't uh,
0:36:11.599,0:36:18.599
-allow
+allow DNS
0:36:19.779,0:36:22.900
Ok, this is typical that when you want to show stuff
it doesn't work
0:36:22.900,0:36:25.369
-it worked earlier, so uh, it's not the network's fault
+It worked earlier, so uh, it's not the network's fault
0:36:25.369,0:36:27.619
let's uh,
@@ -1986,7 +1978,7 @@ So we actually need to
change this
0:36:51.170,0:36:55.099
-The default directory in FreeBSD is bar/db/Tor
+The default directory in FreeBSD is /var/db/tor
0:36:55.099,0:36:57.909
and uh,
@@ -1998,7 +1990,7 @@ and when we start Tor it will actually, uh
create the service directory
0:37:07.499,0:37:11.789
-by itself. It's also a web server listening on port 80
+by itself. It's also a web server listening on port 80
on localhost
0:37:11.789,0:37:13.889
@@ -2008,7 +2000,7 @@ so we can
and hopefully will be able to see it later on
0:37:45.849,0:37:48.529
-okay, so let's see if
+Okay, so let's see if
0:37:48.529,0:37:49.679
this stuff is already
@@ -2024,6 +2016,7 @@ two parts in this directory
0:38:05.069,0:38:11.650
hostname and private key. Private key is uh,
+self-explanatory
0:38:11.650,0:38:14.739
and the hostname is actually what you give to people
@@ -2033,7 +2026,7 @@ if you want to
to publish your service
0:38:33.319,0:38:36.039
-this is actually less likely to work right now
+This is actually less likely to work right now
0:38:36.039,0:38:40.059
because it takes some time for Tor to choose these
@@ -2045,13 +2038,13 @@ introduction points,
send all this stuff to directory services
0:38:44.880,0:38:47.369
-it takes time for directory services to sync up
+It takes time for directory services to sync up
0:38:47.369,0:38:54.329
and actually distribute information to the clients
0:38:54.329,0:39:00.789
-and when we want to exit the service, we actually put
+and when we want to access the service, we actually put
this address into the uh,
0:39:00.789,0:39:03.889
@@ -2061,7 +2054,7 @@ the address line, and uh,
Tor knows how to
0:39:05.069,0:39:12.069
-deal with this uh, the Onion pop up domain, so uh
+deal with this uh, the Onion top-level domain, so uh
0:39:15.410,0:39:22.410
this usually actually works. Let's see what's going on here...
@@ -2097,7 +2090,7 @@ localized web page.
For example, when you are from Germany, and you go to
0:40:02.879,0:40:04.099
-Google.com, you get a German webpage
+google.com, you get a German webpage
0:40:04.099,0:40:07.379
and if you're using Tor and you go to Google,
@@ -2118,7 +2111,7 @@ if it is in the Netherlands,
you get a Dutch Google, which is uh, pretty cool.
0:40:23.329,0:40:25.549
-so uh,
+So uh,
0:40:25.549,0:40:27.419
I'll have to take a look later
@@ -2127,10 +2120,10 @@ I'll have to take a look later
while I'm working
0:40:28.829,0:40:35.829
-so let's just, continue for a moment
+So let's just, continue for a moment
0:40:38.569,0:40:41.009
-ok, to summarize, uh
+Ok, to summarize, uh
0:40:41.009,0:40:44.799
Tor is actually useful if
@@ -2149,23 +2142,23 @@ so theoretically
it should work
0:41:02.509,0:41:03.549
-I should
+that I
0:41:03.549,0:41:06.049
-publish my hidden services from around here
+publish my hidden service around here
0:41:06.049,0:41:10.429
and anyone in the world that's connected to the Tor network
-can actually exit it, access it
+can actually access it
0:41:10.429,0:41:12.169
and uh
0:41:12.169,0:41:14.799
-Privoxy is a pretty cool platform for Tor
+FreeBSD is a pretty cool platform for Tor
0:41:14.799,0:41:18.819
-'cause it's for one, it has very nice
+Because it has very nice
0:41:18.819,0:41:21.779
security features like jail
@@ -2220,7 +2213,7 @@ it depends upon
you can use any port you like
0:42:33.140,0:42:34.539
-depend on uh,
+It depends on uh,
0:42:34.539,0:42:39.279
what port the nodes use. Nodes can use any port
@@ -2247,7 +2240,7 @@ HTTP access can actually access my node
so uh
0:42:56.529,0:43:01.299
-yet in theory uh
+In theory uh
0:43:01.299,0:43:05.959
you can use any port you like.
@@ -2276,9 +2269,6 @@ Yes?
0:44:06.140,0:44:08.689
Well, usually I use Opera, so
-0:44:08.689,0:44:13.679
-a
-
0:44:13.679,0:44:15.659
I didn't know
@@ -2316,7 +2306,7 @@ so, the uh
Tor developers actually run those directory servers
0:45:01.499,0:45:08.499
-but this is really crypto infrastucture
+but this is really critical infrastucture
0:45:11.729,0:45:12.719
uhm
@@ -2325,7 +2315,7 @@ uhm
Well it's it's hard to say
0:45:14.729,0:45:16.219
-'cause the question was uh
+Because the question was uh
0:45:16.219,0:45:21.799
Were there any estimates on uh,
@@ -2372,10 +2362,10 @@ going on
and unfortunately also a lot of filesharing systems
0:45:56.259,0:45:59.739
-which it doesn't relly make sense 'cause they're slow
+which it doesn't relly make sense because they're slow
0:45:59.739,0:46:00.570
-so uhm,
+So uhm,
0:46:00.570,0:46:01.609
Tor is really cool
@@ -2388,4 +2378,4 @@ but if you really want to move a lot of data it's
not a good tool
0:46:10.759,0:46:11.479
-ah, any other questions? Doesn't seem to be the case. Ok!
+Ah, any other questions? Doesn't seem to be the case. Ok!
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/nycbsdcon/dixon-bsdisdying.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/nycbsdcon/dixon-bsdisdying.sbv
index e3ff5ee343..55d933cd40 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/nycbsdcon/dixon-bsdisdying.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/nycbsdcon/dixon-bsdisdying.sbv
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ we're getting there.
Anybody out here last year?
0:00:18.949,0:00:24.939
-Okay. I gave a really bad talk on pf, so and I
+Okay. I gave a really bad talk on pf, and I
appreciate Bob coming out and correcting me this year.
0:00:24.939,0:00:28.550
@@ -49,10 +49,10 @@ But, what is a computer?
0:00:56.610,0:01:03.610
It helps users accomplish tasks. What is a user?
-A user is somebody biped like
+A user is somebody biped
0:01:07.409,0:01:10.600
-biped that stands up right sort of like me.
+that stands up right sort of like me.
0:01:10.600,0:01:14.280
Who am I? My name is Jason Dixon.
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ That’s the question I've been asking myself all along.
To talk about why BSD is dying.
0:01:48.630,0:01:52.380
-Sex, and greed.
+Sex and greed.
0:01:52.380,0:01:59.380
Someone kick these guys out.
@@ -122,7 +122,8 @@ This is a computer. This is also known as a
computer. This is a really big computer.
0:02:22.459,0:02:28.309
-This is a fake computer, and sometimes, just can, well, compute
+This is a big big computer, and sometimes,
+it just can, well, compute
0:02:28.309,0:02:31.339
But what does a computer really do?
@@ -132,7 +133,7 @@ All right, it helps us write documents,
0:02:33.729,0:02:40.729
shopping lists. Sometimes, it can even delete documents.
-It helps us work with emails,
+It helps us work with email,
0:02:42.050,0:02:46.749
surf the Web, movies,
@@ -158,7 +159,7 @@ that is the foundation
0:03:01.489,0:03:07.999
for kernel, libraries, userland applications,
-otherwise known as operating system.
+otherwise known as an operating system.
0:03:07.999,0:03:10.659
like BSD.
@@ -170,12 +171,12 @@ What is a kernel?
It's a wonderful thing, it allows
0:03:16.439,0:03:23.439
-The management and processes of memory, peripheral devices,
+The management of processes memory, peripheral devices,
and by extension, allows us to do networking, security,
0:03:23.540,0:03:26.639
work with disks and file systems, user interfaces,
-userland applications,
+userland applications, like
0:03:26.639,0:03:33.619
people can write documents, check email, surf the Web,
@@ -231,10 +232,10 @@ wasn’t. The Multics was a commercial
0:04:24.970,0:04:29.690
failure. So, a couple of gentlemen like Ken Thompson and
-Dennis Ritchie
+Dennis Ritchie were not
0:04:29.690,0:04:34.539
-[xx] support, like to play games. They worked at Bell Labs
+[xx] support, liked to play games. They worked at Bell Labs
and they had this game called
0:04:34.539,0:04:36.470
@@ -248,7 +249,7 @@ it ran on a PDP-7.
0:04:43.639,0:04:48.989
What is an assembly programmer to do when a game
-doesn’t work properly on the star board? He moves
+doesn’t work properly on the star board? He mauls
0:04:48.989,0:04:53.240
it. So, in 1969, Ken Thompson
@@ -272,7 +273,7 @@ up to two.
And by
0:05:07.100,0:05:11.949
-1970, UNIX was officially known as U-N-I-X
+1970, UNIX was officially known as U-N-I-X Unix
0:05:11.949,0:05:14.759
It ran on a PDP1145
@@ -346,7 +347,7 @@ precursor to sendmail, curses, libraries. 1981,
4.1BSD, this one, we are recorded through VAX
0:06:24.750,0:06:30.539
-4.1BSD addressed memory performance issues with UNIX on VAX
+addressed a number of memory performance issues with UNIX on VAX
0:06:30.539,0:06:34.159
1983, 4.2BSD uses TCP/IP from BBN,
@@ -358,7 +359,7 @@ and also the Berkeley Fast File System from the
gentleman, Kirk McKusick,
0:06:39.219,0:06:44.100
-who also brought us the original BSD mascot.
+who also brought us the original Beastie today.
0:06:44.100,0:06:49.280
In 1986, 4.3BSD introduced performance improvements
@@ -375,7 +376,7 @@ originally intended to run on the Power 6/32
That platform actually never came to fruition
0:07:00.160,0:07:04.280
-but it did allow us to extract some of the
+but it did allow us to abstract some of the
machine-independent
0:07:04.280,0:07:07.240
@@ -444,7 +445,7 @@ BSD3, I'm sorry, the 386BSD, which later on became
BSD/OS by BSDI
0:08:09.659,0:08:14.599
-Exodus. Back in 1992, a wholly own subsidiary of
+Exodus. Back in 1992, a wholly owned subsidiary of
0:08:14.599,0:08:18.699
AT&T called Unix System Laboratories
@@ -472,7 +473,7 @@ code in the
BSD.
0:08:35.960,0:08:40.200
-This was one of their advertising and again, they used
+This was one of their advertising things again, they used
this as the basis for the
0:08:40.200,0:08:42.150
@@ -517,7 +518,7 @@ for BSD is that he hinted,
that…actually by this
0:09:21.829,0:09:25.770
-point, the lawsuit with California Berkeley had been
+point, the University of California Berkeley had been
also added into the
0:09:25.770,0:09:29.030
@@ -565,16 +566,16 @@ the lawsuit was settled out of court
in secret for ten years.
0:10:07.150,0:10:08.870
-In 2004,
+In 2004, a site Groklaw primarily got
0:10:11.490,0:10:14.990
-done with the actual settlement
+what the actual settlement
0:10:14.990,0:10:16.120
-was and really sit.
+was released.
0:10:16.120,0:10:17.910
-And,
+And, well
0:10:17.910,0:10:19.560
USL, AT&T and
@@ -602,10 +603,10 @@ and became the
foundation for
0:10:40.600,0:10:43.470
-a FreeBSD.
+ FreeBSD.
0:10:43.470,0:10:47.500
-NetBSD, I'm sorry, FreeBSD
+NetBSD, I'm sorry, FreeBSD, it ends right there
0:10:49.150,0:10:55.670
FreeBSD, people with background, only different BSDs
@@ -639,13 +640,13 @@ and that’s pretty much what it's known for. To be honest
0:11:25.520,0:11:31.790
I mean, I got to admit I'm an Open BSD guy, I was looking for
-a really cool and innovative features in NetBSD and I really
+a really cool and innovative features for NetBSD and I really
0:11:31.790,0:11:32.329
couldn’t find any.
0:11:32.329,0:11:34.940
-Why am I hanging on this.
+so let them hang their head on this.
0:11:34.940,0:11:37.160
Sorry,
@@ -654,15 +655,16 @@ Sorry,
I know people are going to…
0:11:39.650,0:11:46.650
-I know the NetBSD is going to get me…I can
+I know the NetBSDers is going to jump me…I can
handle two of you. Okay? And this is
0:11:48.680,0:11:51.490
-a list of the platforms that probably
+a list of the hardware platforms that currently supported on
0:11:51.490,0:11:53.820
including a toaster.
+
0:11:53.820,0:11:55.000
@@ -688,7 +690,7 @@ And it comes out with a new release every six months,
generally, in May and November
0:12:17.570,0:12:20.810
-1st, so if you haven’t already, pick a copy, it just came
+1st, so if you haven’t already, pick a copy, that just came
0:12:20.810,0:12:24.880
out of the foil. It's unofficial model is secure by default
@@ -714,7 +716,7 @@ the most obvious example. ProPolice
0:12:52.180,0:12:58.070
Some other features that they’d given us through
-the years – PF, authpf, CARP, fsyncd,
+the years – PF, authpf, CARP, pfsyncd,
0:12:58.070,0:13:01.380
which I think some of these are probably in the
@@ -727,11 +729,11 @@ FreeBSD 4.8. Again,
DragonFlyBSD was
0:13:11.160,0:13:15.640
-FreeBSD 4.8 and was intended to basically
+forked with FreeBSD 4.8 and was intended to basically
0:13:15.640,0:13:21.580
overhaul the SMP features in FreeBSD 6
-and 7,5,6, and 7.
+and 7..5,6, and 7.
0:13:21.580,0:13:25.690
DragonFly is another example. If you look at their goals,
@@ -750,13 +752,13 @@ Of course,
Tiger is an old I'm sorry, OSX
0:13:36.890,0:13:43.890
-It started from the Jolitz project, but it's sort of a inbred
+It started from the Jolitz project, but it's sort of an inbred
0:13:48.870,0:13:53.800
-
+and then various others spearBSD, ecoBSD
0:13:53.800,0:13:58.350
-
+and other minor BSDs
0:13:58.350,0:14:04.130
That is all about, I wanted to cover kind of the present of
@@ -772,7 +774,7 @@ of the project and topic is.
Well, first, because IDC said so.
0:14:16.270,0:14:21.480
-Market share for BSD is, right now, all time low, under 1%
+Market share for BSD is, right now, at an all time low, under 1%
0:14:21.480,0:14:28.480
And, of course, Netcraft confirms these findings.
@@ -789,24 +791,25 @@ I mean, we can't possibly make
money, so that, obviously, means that
0:14:39.310,0:14:46.310
-we're dying. And free software is…
+we're dying. And free software is terrible
0:14:46.390,0:14:53.390
-We know how to say this, when we came out.
-Free software equals terrorism.
+We know the insane let me get out.
+Free software equals terrism.
0:14:55.120,0:14:57.910
0:14:57.910,0:15:04.910
-Our inability to adapt. As you can see by this graph
+Our inability to adapt. As you can see by this graph
0:15:09.630,0:15:15.980
Let's be serious here, people.
+As per FreeBSD network pages per hour search
0:15:15.980,0:15:20.520
-We see Windows, I mean, the way people. Come on,
-they’ve been doing this for a number of what? 15,
+We see Windows, obviously I mean, they are way ahead people.
+Come on, they’ve been doing this for a number of what? 15,
0:15:20.520,0:15:22.180
20 years. Linux is second.
@@ -815,17 +818,18 @@ they’ve been doing this for a number of what? 15,
They actually are showing some.
0:15:24.349,0:15:29.259
-We presume that someone is doing office by doing
+We presume that someone is doing authentication
+by reading user pages
0:15:29.259,0:15:35.450
The BSD is only for register, so we've got to work
on that, of course
0:15:35.450,0:15:37.030
-Loss of talent. Free
+Loss of talent.
0:15:37.030,0:15:41.410
-BSD has lost 93% of their core developers.
+FreeBSD has lost 93% of their core developers.
0:15:41.410,0:15:45.300
Okay, come on, guys, let's go.
@@ -851,12 +855,11 @@ sponsor, and some other company that didn’t sponsor us
0:16:16.070,0:16:17.560
-
0:16:17.560,0:16:20.070
I should just end right there.
0:16:20.070,0:16:21.870
-
+because we're the nearest to them
0:16:21.870,0:16:28.130
Seriously, though, the technological challenge that we
@@ -870,13 +873,13 @@ Of course, developers are in the market, so,
if that happens, that
0:16:33.230,0:16:35.370
-happens. The end is really, really cool.
+happens. Although the end is really, really cool.
0:16:35.370,0:16:40.150
DRM, is obviously evil, yes, I know, I don’t care about
0:16:40.150,0:16:41.690
-DRM. Ran out.
+DRM. Run Dell.
0:16:41.690,0:16:43.980
Right?
@@ -885,10 +888,11 @@ Right?
Political challenges
0:16:45.310,0:16:48.710
-No, this has been hard to admit, but I can't beat
+Now, this has been hard to entertain,
+but I can't read this out in front of
0:16:48.710,0:16:50.530
-people, blobs,
+people. Blobs,
0:16:50.530,0:16:52.140
binary is bad,
@@ -897,10 +901,10 @@ binary is bad,
don’t do it
0:16:53.140,0:16:56.180
-just smoke in the same crack
+just smoke in the same crap
0:16:56.180,0:16:57.540
-
+when it says
0:16:57.540,0:16:59.590
NDAs
@@ -922,7 +926,7 @@ out
okay
0:17:10.120,0:17:12.000
-get your files with your supplier,
+get in touch with your supplier,
0:17:12.000,0:17:16.740
let's get some documentation to these guys.
@@ -931,7 +935,7 @@ let's get some documentation to these guys.
Because without the
0:17:18.159,0:17:20.100
-diversity, we'll have
+diversity, we have
0:17:20.100,0:17:22.220
unity