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+0:00:07.329,0:00:13.679
+You're here, Bob, of course. Bob is hot. Bob is very hot.
+
+0:00:13.679,0:00:14.679
+Welcome to BSD is Dying.
+
+0:00:14.679,0:00:15.779
+No, it's not dead yet,
+
+0:00:15.779,0:00:16.529
+we're getting there.
+
+0:00:16.529,0:00:18.949
+Anybody out here last year?
+
+0:00:18.949,0:00:24.939
+Okay. I gave a really bad talk on pf, so and I
+appreciate Bob coming out and correcting me this year.
+
+0:00:24.939,0:00:28.550
+Anyways, we should go and get started.
+
+0:00:28.550,0:00:33.560
+BSD is Dying.
+
+0:00:33.560,0:00:35.820
+What is BSD?
+
+0:00:35.820,0:00:40.150
+I think most of us know, BSD is a derivative of UNIX.
+
+0:00:40.150,0:00:41.630
+Okay, what is UNIX?
+
+0:00:41.630,0:00:44.300
+UNIX is an
+
+0:00:44.300,0:00:45.260
+operating system.
+
+0:00:45.260,0:00:48.000
+What is an operating system?
+
+0:00:48.000,0:00:53.930
+It runs computers.
+
+0:00:53.930,0:00:56.610
+But, what is a computer?
+
+0:00:56.610,0:01:03.610
+It helps users accomplish tasks. What is a user?
+A user is somebody biped like
+
+0:01:07.409,0:01:10.600
+biped that stands up right sort of like me.
+
+0:01:10.600,0:01:14.280
+Who am I? My name is Jason Dixon.
+
+0:01:14.280,0:01:18.000
+First and foremost, a SysAdmin. I like to work on networks,
+
+0:01:18.000,0:01:18.590
+firewalls. I like to tweak.
+
+0:01:18.590,0:01:21.350
+No. Yes.
+
+0:01:21.350,0:01:27.630
+I'm a programmer, sort of. I enjoy
+
+0:01:27.630,0:01:28.960
+Perl, Postgres,
+
+0:01:28.960,0:01:30.820
+on Apache
+
+0:01:30.820,0:01:34.150
+servers. I'm a consultant here. I'm an employee
+
+0:01:34.150,0:01:38.920
+here, and a lover of
+
+0:01:38.920,0:01:40.150
+BSD.
+
+0:01:40.150,0:01:42.050
+Why am I here?
+
+0:01:42.050,0:01:46.970
+That’s the question I've been asking myself all along.
+
+0:01:46.970,0:01:48.630
+To talk about why BSD is dying.
+
+0:01:48.630,0:01:52.380
+Sex, and greed.
+
+0:01:52.380,0:01:59.380
+Someone kick these guys out.
+
+0:02:00.410,0:02:05.470
+Okay. So again, what is BSD? What is UNIX?
+What is an operating system? What is a computer?
+
+0:02:05.470,0:02:12.470
+Computer is a device that computes, especially a
+programmable electronic machine that performs high-speed
+mathematical or logical operations or that assembles,
+stores, correlates, or
+
+0:02:13.900,0:02:14.390
+otherwise processes
+
+0:02:14.390,0:02:15.529
+information.
+
+0:02:15.529,0:02:19.090
+This is a computer. This is also known as a
+
+0:02:19.090,0:02:22.459
+computer. This is a really big computer.
+
+0:02:22.459,0:02:28.309
+This is a fake computer, and sometimes, just can, well, compute
+
+0:02:28.309,0:02:31.339
+But what does a computer really do?
+
+0:02:31.339,0:02:33.729
+All right, it helps us write documents,
+
+0:02:33.729,0:02:40.729
+shopping lists. Sometimes, it can even delete documents.
+It helps us work with emails,
+
+0:02:42.050,0:02:46.749
+surf the Web, movies,
+
+0:02:46.749,0:02:48.769
+and listen to music.
+
+0:02:48.769,0:02:50.409
+Oh, and yes, games.
+
+0:02:50.409,0:02:53.959
+How? How does the computer let us do these
+
+0:02:53.959,0:02:56.569
+things? Well, it takes the work
+
+0:02:56.569,0:03:00.179
+and using the computer component, we can translate it
+into machine language
+
+0:03:00.179,0:03:01.489
+that is the foundation
+
+0:03:01.489,0:03:07.999
+for kernel, libraries, userland applications,
+otherwise known as operating system.
+
+0:03:07.999,0:03:10.659
+like BSD.
+
+0:03:10.659,0:03:12.619
+What is a kernel?
+
+0:03:12.619,0:03:16.439
+It's a wonderful thing, it allows
+
+0:03:16.439,0:03:23.439
+The management and processes of memory, peripheral devices,
+and by extension, allows us to do networking, security,
+
+0:03:23.540,0:03:26.639
+work with disks and file systems, user interfaces,
+userland applications,
+
+0:03:26.639,0:03:33.619
+people can write documents, check email, surf the Web,
+watch movies, listen to music, and play games.
+
+0:03:33.619,0:03:38.209
+and much, much more.
+
+0:03:38.209,0:03:41.009
+So, in summary, BSD
+
+0:03:41.009,0:03:44.150
+is a UNIX-derived operating system
+
+0:03:44.150,0:03:51.150
+enables users to harness the power of a computer to process
+information. It uses the kernel to manage processes memory,
+and peripheral devices. And by extension, we can perform
+
+0:03:51.730,0:03:58.149
+networking, enforce security, read from and write to storage
+devices, and interface visually to applications like text
+editors, mail clients, Web browsers, multimedia players, and
+
+0:03:58.149,0:04:05.149
+games.
+
+0:04:05.509,0:04:09.199
+In the beginning, I'm going to try and breeze through this,
+people
+
+0:04:09.199,0:04:10.970
+The Holy
+
+0:04:10.970,0:04:15.369
+Trinity – MIT, Bell Labs, and GE created
+a systems called Multics.
+
+0:04:15.369,0:04:18.750
+This is a nice flash from the past.
+
+0:04:18.750,0:04:20.650
+Life was good.
+
+0:04:20.650,0:04:21.639
+No. No.
+
+0:04:21.639,0:04:22.849
+Actually, it
+
+0:04:22.849,0:04:24.970
+wasn’t. The Multics was a commercial
+
+0:04:24.970,0:04:29.690
+failure. So, a couple of gentlemen like Ken Thompson and
+Dennis Ritchie
+
+0:04:29.690,0:04:34.539
+[xx] support, like to play games. They worked at Bell Labs
+and they had this game called
+
+0:04:34.539,0:04:36.470
+Space Travel, which performed really
+
+0:04:36.470,0:04:40.500
+really badly. So, what's…actually, I'm sorry
+
+0:04:40.500,0:04:43.639
+it ran on a PDP-7.
+
+0:04:43.639,0:04:48.989
+What is an assembly programmer to do when a game
+doesn’t work properly on the star board? He moves
+
+0:04:48.989,0:04:53.240
+it. So, in 1969, Ken Thompson
+
+0:04:53.240,0:04:53.969
+and
+
+0:04:53.969,0:04:58.620
+Sorry, came out with the Uniplexed Information
+
+0:04:58.620,0:05:01.270
+and Computing System. It was capable of supporting
+
+0:05:01.270,0:05:02.499
+a number of users
+
+0:05:02.499,0:05:04.189
+up to two.
+
+0:05:05.239,0:05:07.100
+And by
+
+0:05:07.100,0:05:11.949
+1970, UNIX was officially known as U-N-I-X
+
+0:05:11.949,0:05:14.759
+It ran on a PDP1145
+
+0:05:14.759,0:05:17.929
+and was capable of text processing
+
+0:05:17.929,0:05:21.019
+and had utilities like roff and a text editor.
+
+0:05:21.019,0:05:22.409
+for the purpose of
+
+0:05:22.409,0:05:24.210
+patents. By
+
+0:05:24.210,0:05:28.929
+1973, they rewrote UNIX and a programming language called
+
+0:05:28.929,0:05:33.340
+C which allowed AT&T to make the source code available
+to let other
+
+0:05:33.340,0:05:35.650
+people run it on their systems.
+
+0:05:35.650,0:05:40.110
+By 1974, a gentleman by the name of Bob Fabry,
+who was at the University
+
+0:05:40.110,0:05:42.079
+of Cal Berkeley in their Computer Science Department
+
+0:05:42.079,0:05:44.940
+bought a copy of UNIX for $99.
+
+0:05:44.940,0:05:47.710
+to run their PDP-11.
+
+0:05:47.710,0:05:52.850
+By 1977, a gentleman named Bill Joy, a graduate
+
+0:05:52.850,0:05:55.569
+student, distributed the Berkeley Software
+
+0:05:55.569,0:05:56.979
+Distribution as
+
+0:05:56.979,0:06:02.590
+1BSD. It was on a tape media that contained the PASCAL
+
+0:06:02.590,0:06:04.270
+compiler, the ex editor, and
+
+0:06:04.270,0:06:09.289
+by 1978, it was known as 2BSD with
+
+0:06:09.289,0:06:10.179
+vi, csh, and the list
+
+0:06:10.179,0:06:11.549
+goes on.
+
+0:06:11.549,0:06:17.030
+By 4BSD, we had job control, delivermail,
+
+0:06:17.030,0:06:21.339
+precursor to sendmail, curses, libraries. 1981,
+
+0:06:21.339,0:06:24.750
+4.1BSD, this one, we are recorded through VAX
+
+0:06:24.750,0:06:30.539
+4.1BSD addressed memory performance issues with UNIX on VAX
+
+0:06:30.539,0:06:34.159
+1983, 4.2BSD uses TCP/IP from BBN,
+
+0:06:34.159,0:06:36.990
+and also the Berkeley Fast File System from the
+
+0:06:36.990,0:06:39.219
+gentleman, Kirk McKusick,
+
+0:06:39.219,0:06:44.100
+who also brought us the original BSD mascot.
+
+0:06:44.100,0:06:49.280
+In 1986, 4.3BSD introduced performance improvements
+over 4.2BSD
+
+0:06:49.280,0:06:53.299
+By 1988, we had a list called 4.3BSD-Tahoe
+
+0:06:53.299,0:06:57.180
+originally intended to run on the Power 6/32
+“Tahoe” platform.
+
+0:06:57.180,0:07:00.160
+That platform actually never came to fruition
+
+0:07:00.160,0:07:04.280
+but it did allow us to extract some of the
+machine-independent
+
+0:07:04.280,0:07:07.240
+code which allowed it to become portable much later on.
+
+0:07:07.240,0:07:09.050
+By 1989, there was
+
+0:07:09.050,0:07:10.810
+Net/1, which separated the networking code
+
+0:07:10.810,0:07:14.349
+from the AT&T UNIX code
+
+0:07:14.349,0:07:17.399
+allowing for a permissive BSD license
+
+0:07:17.399,0:07:20.479
+By 1990, 4.3BSD-Reno
+
+0:07:20.479,0:07:24.770
+introduced the MACH virtual files, MACH virtual
+
+0:07:24.770,0:07:27.189
+memory system, Sun-compatible NFS
+
+0:07:27.189,0:07:30.939
+However, it was known as a real
+
+0:07:30.939,0:07:34.119
+gamble, hence the Reno moniker.
+
+0:07:34.119,0:07:36.690
+By 1991, we had
+
+0:07:36.690,0:07:40.280
+Net/2 where all AT&T code and utilities were
+replaced or removed
+
+0:07:40.280,0:07:44.439
+and ran on the Intel 386
+
+0:07:44.439,0:07:47.360
+and it became the basis for the 386BSD
+
+0:07:47.360,0:07:50.840
+and BSD/386 releases.
+
+0:07:50.840,0:07:52.870
+A gentleman by the name of Bill Jolitz
+
+0:07:52.870,0:07:54.880
+behind 386
+
+0:07:54.880,0:07:58.169
+BSD release, which eventually became the foundation for
+
+0:07:58.169,0:07:59.849
+FreeBSD and NetBSD.
+
+0:07:59.849,0:08:02.250
+And the
+
+0:08:02.250,0:08:09.250
+BSD3, I'm sorry, the 386BSD, which later on became
+BSD/OS by BSDI
+
+0:08:09.659,0:08:14.599
+Exodus. Back in 1992, a wholly own subsidiary of
+
+0:08:14.599,0:08:18.699
+AT&T called Unix System Laboratories
+
+0:08:18.699,0:08:20.389
+decided to go after
+
+0:08:20.389,0:08:22.539
+BSDI for
+
+0:08:22.539,0:08:25.249
+I'm sorry,
+
+0:08:25.249,0:08:26.860
+in New
+
+0:08:26.860,0:08:33.139
+Jersey, as for an injunction against him due to various
+what they consider proprietary
+
+0:08:33.139,0:08:34.650
+code in the
+
+0:08:34.650,0:08:35.960
+BSD.
+
+0:08:35.960,0:08:40.200
+This was one of their advertising and again, they used
+this as the basis for the
+
+0:08:40.200,0:08:42.150
+lawsuit. I have
+
+0:08:42.150,0:08:44.640
+no idea what that’s for.
+
+0:08:44.640,0:08:47.660
+
+
+0:08:47.660,0:08:52.440
+Net/2 was basically, I'm sorry
+
+0:08:52.440,0:08:55.809
+the three BSDIs version of BSD OS is basically Net/2
+
+0:08:55.809,0:08:58.239
++ 6 files that they had version from
+
+0:08:58.239,0:09:00.540
+Bill Jolitz’s 386
+
+0:09:00.540,0:09:05.030
+BSD. The lawsuit was, I'm sorry, the court settlement was
+
+0:09:05.030,0:09:09.020
+ruled over by a judge who denied the injunction
+
+0:09:09.020,0:09:11.469
+and asked them to narrow their
+
+0:09:11.469,0:09:15.650
+complaint to recent California copyrights
+and the possibility of the loss of
+
+0:09:15.650,0:09:19.299
+trade secrets. He also did a really great thing
+for BSD is that he hinted,
+
+0:09:19.299,0:09:21.829
+that…actually by this
+
+0:09:21.829,0:09:25.770
+point, the lawsuit with California Berkeley had been
+also added into the
+
+0:09:25.770,0:09:29.030
+lawsuit. Well, he gave a hint to bring the case to the state
+
+0:09:29.030,0:09:30.160
+court. So,
+
+0:09:30.160,0:09:36.110
+BSD laywers were pretty smart over at Cal and they decided
+to make a run over to the state court by the next
+
+0:09:36.110,0:09:38.690
+Monday to file a countersuit
+
+0:09:38.690,0:09:39.390
+against USL,
+
+0:09:39.390,0:09:43.250
+in the state of California.
+
+0:09:43.250,0:09:46.280
+Soon after USL went up for
+
+0:09:46.280,0:09:49.070
+sale, and it was bought by Novell
+
+0:09:49.070,0:09:53.860
+A gentleman, Ray Noorda, the CEO
+
+0:09:53.860,0:09:58.730
+at Novell, agreed to a settlement at this point because
+they understood that there was
+
+0:09:58.730,0:10:01.060
+no copyright infringement in the
+
+0:10:01.060,0:10:03.510
+code. So, basically,
+
+0:10:03.510,0:10:05.850
+the lawsuit was settled out of court
+
+0:10:05.850,0:10:07.150
+in secret for ten years.
+
+0:10:07.150,0:10:08.870
+In 2004,
+
+0:10:11.490,0:10:14.990
+done with the actual settlement
+
+0:10:14.990,0:10:16.120
+was and really sit.
+
+0:10:16.120,0:10:17.910
+And,
+
+0:10:17.910,0:10:19.560
+USL, AT&T and
+
+0:10:19.560,0:10:20.550
+Novell sort of
+
+0:10:20.550,0:10:22.190
+was embarrassed,
+
+0:10:22.190,0:10:27.060
+which ended up resulting in two distinct releases
+
+0:10:27.060,0:10:32.990
+4.4BSD, there is an encumbered version and had USL license
+
+0:10:32.990,0:10:37.490
+and AT&T code, and 4.4BSD-Lite, which was completely
+unencumbered
+
+0:10:37.490,0:10:39.460
+and became the
+
+0:10:39.460,0:10:40.600
+foundation for
+
+0:10:40.600,0:10:43.470
+a FreeBSD.
+
+0:10:43.470,0:10:47.500
+NetBSD, I'm sorry, FreeBSD
+
+0:10:49.150,0:10:55.670
+FreeBSD, people with background, only different BSDs
+that came out of 386BSD
+
+0:10:55.670,0:11:00.900
+It runs on Intel x86, Itanium, AMD64, Alpha, Sun Ultra
+
+0:11:00.900,0:11:05.149
+SPARC and it gives us the neat features of jail, which
+most of us are familiar with,
+
+0:11:05.149,0:11:07.420
+mandatory access control as MACH
+
+0:11:07.420,0:11:10.830
+and historically, had a very strong TCP/
+
+0:11:10.830,0:11:11.750
+IP and SMP performance.
+
+0:11:11.750,0:11:16.150
+The original NetBSD, which also came from 386BSD
+
+0:11:18.680,0:11:22.200
+Over 50 hardware platforms from a single
+source tree
+
+0:11:22.200,0:11:25.520
+and that’s pretty much what it's known for. To be honest
+
+0:11:25.520,0:11:31.790
+I mean, I got to admit I'm an Open BSD guy, I was looking for
+a really cool and innovative features in NetBSD and I really
+
+0:11:31.790,0:11:32.329
+couldn’t find any.
+
+0:11:32.329,0:11:34.940
+Why am I hanging on this.
+
+0:11:34.940,0:11:37.160
+Sorry,
+
+0:11:37.160,0:11:39.650
+I know people are going to…
+
+0:11:39.650,0:11:46.650
+I know the NetBSD is going to get me…I can
+handle two of you. Okay? And this is
+
+0:11:48.680,0:11:51.490
+a list of the platforms that probably
+
+0:11:51.490,0:11:53.820
+including a toaster.
+
+0:11:53.820,0:11:55.000
+
+
+0:11:55.000,0:11:56.410
+OpenBSD,
+
+0:11:56.410,0:11:59.179
+this is one of the old logos, this is the new
+
+0:11:59.179,0:12:03.510
+logo. It was forked from NetBSD 1.0, we won't go
+into the history, I know
+
+0:12:03.510,0:12:08.929
+most people know it, and it's supported by about
+16 official platforms
+
+0:12:08.929,0:12:12.530
+platforms. This is about half of the most popular ones.
+
+0:12:12.530,0:12:17.570
+And it comes out with a new release every six months,
+generally, in May and November
+
+0:12:17.570,0:12:20.810
+1st, so if you haven’t already, pick a copy, it just came
+
+0:12:20.810,0:12:24.880
+out of the foil. It's unofficial model is secure by default
+
+0:12:24.880,0:12:31.880
+only what's needed is running on the default
+
+0:12:32.750,0:12:35.690
+And, some of their goals
+
+0:12:35.690,0:12:38.300
+and features - full disclosure, audits,
+
+0:12:38.300,0:12:43.950
+privsep, privilege separation & revocation, chroot jails,
+like FreeBSD,
+
+0:12:43.950,0:12:48.910
+random values wherever possible. This is probably
+
+0:12:48.910,0:12:52.180
+the most obvious example. ProPolice
+
+0:12:52.180,0:12:58.070
+Some other features that they’d given us through
+the years – PF, authpf, CARP, fsyncd,
+
+0:12:58.070,0:13:01.380
+which I think some of these are probably in the
+
+0:13:01.380,0:13:08.380
+FreeBSD by now. DragonFlyBSD was a continuation of
+FreeBSD 4.8. Again,
+
+0:13:08.760,0:13:11.160
+DragonFlyBSD was
+
+0:13:11.160,0:13:15.640
+FreeBSD 4.8 and was intended to basically
+
+0:13:15.640,0:13:21.580
+overhaul the SMP features in FreeBSD 6
+and 7,5,6, and 7.
+
+0:13:21.580,0:13:25.690
+DragonFly is another example. If you look at their goals,
+it had some really neat technological stuff.
+
+0:13:25.690,0:13:28.500
+I can't find any features that really, you
+
+0:13:28.500,0:13:31.830
+know, mean anything.
+
+0:13:31.830,0:13:33.130
+Of course,
+
+0:13:33.130,0:13:36.890
+Tiger is an old I'm sorry, OSX
+
+0:13:36.890,0:13:43.890
+It started from the Jolitz project, but it's sort of a inbred
+
+0:13:48.870,0:13:53.800
+
+
+0:13:53.800,0:13:58.350
+
+
+0:13:58.350,0:14:04.130
+That is all about, I wanted to cover kind of the present of
+where we are right now, some of the myths and truths.
+
+0:14:04.130,0:14:08.260
+Why is BSD dying? Really, that’s what the title
+
+0:14:08.260,0:14:11.750
+of the project and topic is.
+
+0:14:11.750,0:14:16.270
+Well, first, because IDC said so.
+
+0:14:16.270,0:14:21.480
+Market share for BSD is, right now, all time low, under 1%
+
+0:14:21.480,0:14:28.480
+And, of course, Netcraft confirms these findings.
+Last place in the SysAdmin networking test, so we all
+
+0:14:29.660,0:14:30.930
+know that word, we're just big losers.
+
+0:14:30.930,0:14:37.610
+Because open-source projects are giving away free software.
+I mean, we can't possibly make
+
+0:14:37.610,0:14:39.310
+money, so that, obviously, means that
+
+0:14:39.310,0:14:46.310
+we're dying. And free software is…
+
+0:14:46.390,0:14:53.390
+We know how to say this, when we came out.
+Free software equals terrorism.
+
+0:14:55.120,0:14:57.910
+
+
+0:14:57.910,0:15:04.910
+Our inability to adapt. As you can see by this graph
+
+0:15:09.630,0:15:15.980
+Let's be serious here, people.
+
+0:15:15.980,0:15:20.520
+We see Windows, I mean, the way people. Come on,
+they’ve been doing this for a number of what? 15,
+
+0:15:20.520,0:15:22.180
+20 years. Linux is second.
+
+0:15:22.180,0:15:24.349
+They actually are showing some.
+
+0:15:24.349,0:15:29.259
+We presume that someone is doing office by doing
+
+0:15:29.259,0:15:35.450
+The BSD is only for register, so we've got to work
+on that, of course
+
+0:15:35.450,0:15:37.030
+Loss of talent. Free
+
+0:15:37.030,0:15:41.410
+BSD has lost 93% of their core developers.
+
+0:15:41.410,0:15:45.300
+Okay, come on, guys, let's go.
+
+0:15:45.300,0:15:48.030
+But not all is lost.
+
+0:15:48.030,0:15:53.600
+Fortunately, a few very small companies still
+use BSD in this age.
+
+0:15:53.600,0:15:56.450
+
+
+0:15:56.450,0:16:02.590
+I know you probably have heard most of these.
+
+0:16:02.590,0:16:05.780
+Believe it or not, this is our premier
+
+0:16:05.780,0:16:12.780
+sponsor, and some other company that didn’t sponsor us
+
+0:16:16.070,0:16:17.560
+
+
+0:16:17.560,0:16:20.070
+I should just end right there.
+
+0:16:20.070,0:16:21.870
+
+
+0:16:21.870,0:16:28.130
+Seriously, though, the technological challenge that we
+have ahead of us. Virtualization, that’s a big deal
+
+0:16:28.130,0:16:29.529
+as far as the market.
+
+0:16:29.529,0:16:33.230
+Of course, developers are in the market, so,
+if that happens, that
+
+0:16:33.230,0:16:35.370
+happens. The end is really, really cool.
+
+0:16:35.370,0:16:40.150
+DRM, is obviously evil, yes, I know, I don’t care about
+
+0:16:40.150,0:16:41.690
+DRM. Ran out.
+
+0:16:41.690,0:16:43.980
+Right?
+
+0:16:43.980,0:16:45.310
+Political challenges
+
+0:16:45.310,0:16:48.710
+No, this has been hard to admit, but I can't beat
+
+0:16:48.710,0:16:50.530
+people, blobs,
+
+0:16:50.530,0:16:52.140
+binary is bad,
+
+0:16:52.140,0:16:53.140
+don’t do it
+
+0:16:53.140,0:16:56.180
+just smoke in the same crack
+
+0:16:56.180,0:16:57.540
+
+
+0:16:57.540,0:16:59.590
+NDAs
+
+0:16:59.590,0:17:01.900
+and closed documentation.
+
+0:17:01.900,0:17:06.460
+How many of us here are actual core developers for
+one of the BSDs?
+
+0:17:06.460,0:17:08.159
+Okay, the rest of us, let's help them
+
+0:17:08.159,0:17:09.420
+out
+
+0:17:09.420,0:17:10.120
+okay
+
+0:17:10.120,0:17:12.000
+get your files with your supplier,
+
+0:17:12.000,0:17:16.740
+let's get some documentation to these guys.
+
+0:17:16.740,0:17:18.159
+Because without the
+
+0:17:18.159,0:17:20.100
+diversity, we'll have
+
+0:17:20.100,0:17:22.220
+unity
+
+0:17:22.220,0:17:24.630
+and a common goal.
+
+0:17:27.420,0:17:30.090
+Thank you.