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-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/article.sgml2
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/linux-emulation/article.sgml2
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/corp-net-guide/book.sgml2
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/dev-model/book.sgml8
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/faq/book.sgml2
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/network-servers/chapter.sgml4
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/security/chapter.sgml4
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2006/mckusick-kernelinternals/mckusick-kernelinternals-1.sbv72
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv32
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/asiabsdcon/rao-kernellocking-1.sbv42
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/bejtlich-networksecurity.sbv2
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/dixon-bsdisstilldying.sbv2
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/mckusick-historyofbsd.sbv15
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/glossary/freebsd-glossary.sgml8
-rw-r--r--en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/teams.ent2
15 files changed, 100 insertions, 99 deletions
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/article.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/article.sgml
index 1d7051b2bc..a5ce2b810f 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/article.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/article.sgml
@@ -731,7 +731,7 @@ the new builds.</screen>
* Why is this tip necessary? What is the original problem it tries
to solve?
- * How to install the changes of the tip (preferrably in a <procedure>
+ * How to install the changes of the tip, preferably in a <procedure>
element, with clearly separated steps.
* How to check that the changes of the tip had a measurable and
noticeable effect.
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/linux-emulation/article.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/linux-emulation/article.sgml
index 03c46148dd..a006b99375 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/linux-emulation/article.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/linux-emulation/article.sgml
@@ -1105,7 +1105,7 @@
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para><function>fgetvp</function> - given a thread and a file
- descripton number it returns the associated vnode</para>
+ descriptor number it returns the associated vnode</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>&man.vn.lock.9; - locks a vnode</para>
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/corp-net-guide/book.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/corp-net-guide/book.sgml
index 157c9bf200..b8f08ec6ea 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/corp-net-guide/book.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/corp-net-guide/book.sgml
@@ -214,7 +214,7 @@
Windows was released, HP decided to expand into the desktop laser
jet market with the first LaserJet series of printers. At the time
there was much pressure on Microsoft to use Adobe Type Manager for
- scaleable fonts within Windows, and to print PostScript to
+ scalable fonts within Windows, and to print PostScript to
higher-end printers. Microsoft decided against doing this and used
a technically inferior font standard, Truetype. They thought that
it would be unlikely that the user would download fonts to the
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/dev-model/book.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/dev-model/book.sgml
index 0ca46b9a4f..cc0cccba9f 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/dev-model/book.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/dev-model/book.sgml
@@ -1089,8 +1089,8 @@
The Election Manager is responsible for the
<xref linkend="process-core-election"> process. The manager
is responsible for running and maintaining the election
- system, and is the final authority should minor unforseen
- events happen in the election process. Major unforseen
+ system, and is the final authority should minor unforeseen
+ events happen in the election process. Major unforeseen
events have to be discussed with the <xref linkend="role-core">
</para>
<para>
@@ -1196,10 +1196,10 @@
<title>Donations Liaison Officer</title>
<para>
The task of
- the donations liason officer is to match
+ the donations liaison officer is to match
the developers with needs with people or
organisations willing to make a
- donation. The Donations Liason Charter is
+ donation. The Donations Liaison Charter is
available
<ulink url="http://www.freebsd.org/donations/">here</ulink>
</para>
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/faq/book.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/faq/book.sgml
index 9a89e5df63..8bbfa496d2 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/faq/book.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/faq/book.sgml
@@ -2756,7 +2756,7 @@ bindkey ^[[3~ delete-char # for xterm</programlisting>
<answer>
<para>No, and there is not likely to be.</para>
- <para>Broadcom refuses to publically release programming
+ <para>Broadcom refuses to publicly release programming
information for their wireless chipsets, most likely
because they use software controlled radios. In order to
get FCC type acceptance for their parts, they have to
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/network-servers/chapter.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/network-servers/chapter.sgml
index bc48a50f7e..545c22f19a 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/network-servers/chapter.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/network-servers/chapter.sgml
@@ -2518,7 +2518,7 @@ nis_client_flags="-S <replaceable>NIS domain</replaceable>,<replaceable>server</
on which password format is used within your network. If you
have trouble authenticating on an NIS client, this is a pretty
good place to start looking for possible problems. Remember:
- if you want to deploy an NIS server for a heterogenous
+ if you want to deploy an NIS server for a heterogeneous
network, you will probably have to use DES on all systems
because it is the lowest common standard.</para>
</sect2>
@@ -3393,7 +3393,7 @@ zone "." { type hint; file "/etc/namedb/named.root"; };
As documented at http://dns.icann.org/services/axfr/ these zones:
"." (the root), ARPA, IN-ADDR.ARPA, IP6.ARPA, and ROOT-SERVERS.NET
- are availble for AXFR from these servers on IPv4 and IPv6:
+ are available for AXFR from these servers on IPv4 and IPv6:
xfr.lax.dns.icann.org, xfr.cjr.dns.icann.org
*/
/*
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/security/chapter.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/security/chapter.sgml
index 33a477dbf9..f46ac250a9 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/security/chapter.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/security/chapter.sgml
@@ -632,7 +632,7 @@
enough. Workarounds like this may not be possible for all secure
levels or for all the potential restrictions they enforce. A bit of
forward planning is a good idea. Understanding the restrictions
- imposed by each secure level is important as they severly diminish
+ imposed by each secure level is important as they severely diminish
the ease of system use. It will also make choosing a default
setting much simpler and prevent any surprises.</para>
</note>
@@ -740,7 +740,7 @@
as a post-break-in evaluation mechanism. It is especially
useful in tracking down how an intruder has actually broken into
a system, assuming the file is still intact after the break-in has
- occured.</para>
+ occurred.</para>
<para>Finally, security scripts should process the log files, and the
logs themselves should be generated in as secure a manner as
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2006/mckusick-kernelinternals/mckusick-kernelinternals-1.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2006/mckusick-kernelinternals/mckusick-kernelinternals-1.sbv
index f094452547..16dcca9e84 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2006/mckusick-kernelinternals/mckusick-kernelinternals-1.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2006/mckusick-kernelinternals/mckusick-kernelinternals-1.sbv
@@ -393,14 +393,14 @@ broad brush high level
description of what's going on
0:05:50.569,0:05:54.719
-and then I will go back and i'll go through the
+and then I will go back and I'll go through the
same material again but at a lower level of
0:05:54.719,0:05:55.300
detail
0:05:55.300,0:05:59.939
-then i finally go back and go through a very nittily
+then I finally go back and go through a very nittily
low-level of detail
0:05:59.939,0:06:04.649
@@ -419,7 +419,7 @@ when I get to the end of one of those nearly
low level niggly details
0:06:14.190,0:06:17.900
-i'll give you a clue as i will say ""Brain
+I'll give you a clue as I will say ""Brain
reset, I'm starting a new topic"" so even if
0:06:17.900,0:06:19.330
@@ -464,7 +464,7 @@ outline of what we're going to try and do here
here
0:06:56.919,0:07:01.169
-As i said we're going to go roughly
+As I said we're going to go roughly
0:07:01.169,0:07:03.270
just about two-and-an-half hours of lecture
@@ -506,7 +506,7 @@ and then
you have to sort of layout terminology
0:07:29.739,0:07:32.080
-although we use normal english words
+although we use normal English words
0:07:32.080,0:07:34.419
they have
@@ -848,7 +848,7 @@ is
0:12:28.660,0:12:33.440
one well let me just give it as a bit
-of advice to the class esspecially those of
+of advice to the class especially those of
0:12:33.440,0:12:36.780
you who work in system administration.
@@ -1013,7 +1013,7 @@ because that just leads to trouble.
0:14:59.390,0:15:03.390
But Filesystems think they have buffers and so
-there's this manouver where we make
+there's this maneuver where we make
0:15:03.390,0:15:06.149
these things that look like what historically
@@ -1054,7 +1054,7 @@ which is %uh more commonly used
for example what is used by ext3
0:15:39.630,0:15:41.179
-and so i'll go through soft updates and
+and so I'll go through soft updates and
0:15:41.179,0:15:45.260
a lot of the issues in soft updates are the
@@ -1091,7 +1091,7 @@ if
0:16:12.500,0:16:15.920
you've worked with things like the network
-appilance box you're probably quite
+appliance box you're probably quite
0:16:15.920,0:16:19.640
aware of what snapshots are and how they do
@@ -1302,7 +1302,7 @@ read that paper if you say yeah yeah yeah
yeah yeah you are done with Week 8.
0:19:18.279,0:19:20.590
-on the other hand if you dont come to Week
+on the other hand if you don't come to Week
8
0:19:20.590,0:19:22.790
@@ -1449,7 +1449,7 @@ iteration of what the actual protocols
are
0:21:22.440,0:21:24.940
-i'll talk primarily about IPv4
+I'll talk primarily about IPv4
0:21:24.940,0:21:31.940
but I will also try and talk a bit about
@@ -1540,7 +1540,7 @@ or is it
0:22:37.309,0:22:42.220
being overrun because we're simply trying
-to do too much on this machine?,etc.
+to do too much on this machine? etc.
0:22:42.220,0:22:45.440
so that's the sort of level of thing that we're
@@ -1721,7 +1721,7 @@ for the core processor and the one which
should be the floating point unit and several
0:25:20.030,0:25:24.080
-of them that would be the memory the core momory
+of them that would be the memory the core memory
literally the core memory
0:25:24.080,0:25:29.110
@@ -1993,10 +1993,10 @@ what the interfaces that they had there
0:28:52.669,0:28:58.660
was one that had these characteristics
- had a a paged virtual address space
+had a paged virtual address space
0:28:58.660,0:29:02.980
-so you din't have to know as in the old days how much physical
+so you didn't have to know as in the old days how much physical
memory is on the machine and make your application
0:29:02.980,0:29:04.740
@@ -2148,7 +2148,7 @@ time
AT&T bell laboratories
0:31:17.129,0:31:19.750
-the big industrial labratory at that time
+the big industrial laboratory at that time
0:31:19.750,0:31:21.380
and MIT
@@ -2357,7 +2357,7 @@ what it references in order to be able to read
and write that thing
0:34:07.940,0:34:11.290
-so if i hand you a descriptor
+so if I hand you a descriptor
you can read from that the descriptor or you can write
0:34:11.290,0:34:13.259
@@ -2391,7 +2391,7 @@ file, close a file
0:34:33.419,0:34:37.429
and there was another set of system calls which
-would open a terminal,read a terminal, write terminal,
+would open a terminal, read a terminal, write terminal,
0:34:37.429,0:34:38.089
close terminal
@@ -2400,7 +2400,7 @@ close terminal
and yet another one
0:34:39.210,0:34:42.409
-which was create a pipe,read a pipe,
+which was create a pipe, read a pipe,
write a pipe and so on.
0:34:42.409,0:34:47.699
@@ -2415,11 +2415,11 @@ my input a terminal which in case I need to
use the read terminal
0:34:53.159,0:34:57.419
-or is it a file which in case i need
+or is it a file which in case I need
to use read file or is it a pipe in which in case
0:34:57.419,0:34:59.189
-i need to use read pipe
+I need to use read pipe
0:34:59.189,0:35:01.860
and so the program itself had to have all
@@ -2533,7 +2533,7 @@ virtual machines
Okay? so far so good?
0:36:22.499,0:36:24.719
-all right so i said that there were
+all right so I said that there were
0:36:24.719,0:36:27.160
two key ideas that UNIX had
@@ -2691,7 +2691,7 @@ get your deck pull out the card, and type the
new one, put it back in and re-submit it
0:38:25.239,0:38:28.729
-As heaven forbid you couldnt touch that
+As heaven forbid you couldn't touch that
card reader you know, it had to be done by
0:38:28.729,0:38:29.970
@@ -2893,7 +2893,7 @@ behind you those pipes were actually implemented
as files
0:41:15.809,0:41:19.319
-but you didn't have atleast to remember to create
+but you didn't have at least to remember to create
them and delete them
0:41:19.319,0:41:20.200
@@ -3049,7 +3049,7 @@ or it may in fact be things that the program
is bringing down upon itself
0:43:22.339,0:43:25.590
-such as a segment fault,a divide by zero
+such as a segment fault, a divide by zero
0:43:25.590,0:43:26.910
and some other
@@ -3122,10 +3122,10 @@ it just compute something all we really care
about is how long it takes them to compute
0:44:23.249,0:44:24.959
-we dont actually care what the answer is
+we don't actually care what the answer is
0:44:24.959,0:44:26.019
-In theory we dont
+In theory we don't
0:44:26.019,0:44:29.779
I personally like my benchmark stop with
@@ -3342,7 +3342,7 @@ I'll go more into some detail about how that
actually gets implemented
0:47:18.899,0:47:22.729
-but in essense you can think of it
+but in essence you can think of it
is is there sort of this whaling Wall and these little
0:47:22.729,0:47:24.990
@@ -3455,7 +3455,7 @@ it looks a lot like any other library that
you would write if you look at top half kernel
0:48:45.539,0:48:49.640
-code you know you see all read,come in
+code you know you see all read, come in
it's got these parameters we Mark around we
0:48:49.640,0:48:53.719
@@ -3576,7 +3576,7 @@ and if you actually
then go to sleep.oh man
0:50:17.219,0:50:20.469
-you didnt tell us you're going to do this we
+you didn't tell us you're going to do this we
have to go off to do a whole lot of other work
0:50:20.469,0:50:23.029
@@ -3715,7 +3715,7 @@ and they try to allocate memory and it's not
available
0:52:01.689,0:52:05.049
-they historically coudnt wait for memory to be
+they historically couldn't wait for memory to be
available
0:52:05.049,0:52:08.380
@@ -3934,7 +3934,7 @@ that is what you normally use there are other
schedulers like the real time scheduler
0:55:01.360,0:55:02.869
-where what I'm saying isnt that true
+where what I'm saying isn't that true
0:55:02.869,0:55:05.709
we'll talk about some of the schedulers was
@@ -4110,7 +4110,7 @@ address space
this of course is desirable because
0:57:23.759,0:57:27.059
-when you're running in this unprevileged
+when you're running in this unprivileged
mode
0:57:27.059,0:57:28.300
@@ -4176,7 +4176,7 @@ to do whatever they want
0:58:13.109,0:58:16.730
whereas when you're running in unprivileged
-mode you cant write those kinds of
+mode you can't write those kinds of
0:58:16.730,0:58:20.179
of things
@@ -4186,7 +4186,7 @@ so modern versions of Windows anything from about
2000 on
0:58:24.119,0:58:26.630
-now run with privileged and unprevileged mode
+now run with privileged and unprivileged mode
0:58:26.630,0:58:28.649
but UNIX has always required that
@@ -4198,7 +4198,7 @@ and so when you're running an
user process
0:58:31.319,0:58:33.389
-you cannot block i mean
+you cannot block I mean
0:58:33.389,0:58:37.969
you cannot execute the instructions which
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv
index f4af5c5cd5..4bf8dbdd01 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2007/meetbsd/brueffer-torprvacy.sbv
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ I'll talk about later
uh, so...
0:00:36.290,0:00:39.500
-I want to first talk about who needs anonimity anyway
+I want to first talk about who needs anonymity anyway
0:00:39.500,0:00:42.880
Is it just for criminals or some other bad guys, right?
@@ -124,7 +124,7 @@ It was really dangerous to do anything on the Internet
So, so umm
0:02:17.719,0:02:20.489
-socialy sensitive information, like when you want to uh,
+socially sensitive information, like when you want to uh,
0:02:20.489,0:02:23.719
when you were abused
@@ -912,7 +912,7 @@ this is important for uh, if you
want to run you own node, uh
0:15:18.540,0:15:19.220
-waht kind of node you actually want to run
+what kind of node you actually want to run
0:15:19.220,0:15:24.120
if you look at the picture, uh earlier
@@ -1106,7 +1106,7 @@ she chooses one of the uh introduction points
and uh,
0:18:55.930,0:19:02.920
-posts a circle rendesvouz cookie there. A piece of
+posts a circle rendezvous cookie there. A piece of
data so uh, she can, uh
0:19:02.920,0:19:05.480
@@ -1119,7 +1119,7 @@ and uh, she also
gives the introduction point
0:19:07.860,0:19:14.500
-the address of her random rendesvouz point that
+the address of her random rendezvous point that
Alice has chosen
0:19:14.500,0:19:18.550
@@ -1132,28 +1132,28 @@ some data has been stored in the introduction point
and Alice and Bob uh,
0:19:28.160,0:19:31.230
-make a rendesvouz point, and
+make a rendezvous point, and
0:19:31.230,0:19:34.940
Bob uses this, this uh
0:19:34.940,0:19:36.700
-rendesvouz cookie to
+rendezvous cookie to
0:19:36.700,0:19:38.180
-actually identify himself on the rendesvouz point
+actually identify himself on the rendezvous point
0:19:38.180,0:19:39.990
and after that
0:19:39.990,0:19:46.990
-all the connection of data runs through this rendesvouz point.
+all the connection of data runs through this rendezvous point.
0:19:50.870,0:19:53.180
uh, if time permits I'll actually uh,
0:19:53.180,0:19:54.710
-set up a rendesvouz
+set up a rendezvous
0:19:54.710,0:19:55.960
a hidden service here
@@ -1187,7 +1187,7 @@ you may get into trouble for using Tor
practically, anyone knows this
0:20:25.580,0:20:27.580
-there can be crytpo restrictions
+there can be crypto restrictions
0:20:27.580,0:20:29.070
for example Great Britain, the uh
@@ -1478,7 +1478,7 @@ so you can run a Tor server in Jail.
It's also Disk and Swap encryption
0:24:32.950,0:24:38.010
-which is important, especialy the swap encryption. And uh,
+which is important, especially the swap encryption. And uh,
0:24:38.010,0:24:39.390
there's also audit
@@ -1919,7 +1919,7 @@ as I said, the hidden service is identified by a
public key, and uh, if you
0:35:19.369,0:35:22.159
-uncomment this sutff,
+uncomment this stuff,
0:35:22.159,0:35:24.999
and uh,
@@ -2306,7 +2306,7 @@ so, the uh
Tor developers actually run those directory servers
0:45:01.499,0:45:08.499
-but this is really critical infrastucture
+but this is really critical infrastructure
0:45:11.729,0:45:12.719
uhm
@@ -2338,7 +2338,7 @@ and uh, I'm not sure of the traffic.
I used to run a middleman node,
0:45:39.219,0:45:40.369
-and in one monthm
+and in one month
0:45:40.369,0:45:42.699
it would make
@@ -2362,7 +2362,7 @@ going on
and unfortunately also a lot of filesharing systems
0:45:56.259,0:45:59.739
-which it doesn't relly make sense because they're slow
+which it doesn't really make sense because they're slow
0:45:59.739,0:46:00.570
So uhm,
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/asiabsdcon/rao-kernellocking-1.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/asiabsdcon/rao-kernellocking-1.sbv
index 5fcc88159c..e0eb130aa8 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/asiabsdcon/rao-kernellocking-1.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/asiabsdcon/rao-kernellocking-1.sbv
@@ -458,7 +458,7 @@ that were imported new kernel memory allocator that was
that I discovered
0:07:45.009,0:07:48.439
-and the scheduler was move with a seperate lock
+and the scheduler was move with a separate lock
0:07:48.439,0:07:50.449
in order to
@@ -563,7 +563,7 @@ all the thread willing to acquire to read mode to
concurrently adjust to the structure but prevents the threads from
0:09:23.699,0:09:25.390
-writing nto the protected path.
+writing to the protected path.
0:09:25.390,0:09:28.890
while the reader..while they are readers
@@ -690,7 +690,7 @@ as we are going to see I think they're going to see it and
its usage is pretty much discouraged
0:11:23.570,0:11:28.320
-basically FreeBSD you can consider locking primative divided into three classes
+basically FreeBSD you can consider locking primitive divided into three classes
0:11:28.320,0:11:31.250
three classes of
@@ -999,7 +999,7 @@ but as you're going to see we've used two techniques in order to
to cope with that
0:16:42.020,0:16:45.830
-another thing is that while you cant
+another thing is that while you can't
0:16:45.830,0:16:47.920
allow
@@ -1011,7 +1011,7 @@ context switches while having
while holding spin lock
0:16:52.570,0:16:55.249
-it's obvious you cant
+it's obvious you can't
0:16:55.249,0:16:59.580
acquire a locking primitive while holding a spin lock
@@ -1101,7 +1101,7 @@ we
solve this problem actually in the
0:18:17.780,0:18:21.170
-kernel using a technique called priority propogation
+kernel using a technique called priority propagation
0:18:21.170,0:18:22.020
basically
@@ -1146,7 +1146,7 @@ Read locks
cannot support
0:18:57.310,0:19:03.430
-priority propogation fixes for read lock that happens because you'd like to
+priority propagation fixes for read lock that happens because you'd like to
0:19:03.430,0:19:07.290
the turnstile should keep track of all the readers
@@ -1185,7 +1185,7 @@ basically
what happens
0:19:39.070,0:19:42.150
-about the priority propogation is that the
+about the priority propagation is that the
0:19:42.150,0:19:44.830
the threads and the turnstiles
@@ -1235,7 +1235,7 @@ and this owner has a priority of two hundred and fifty six
0:20:26.150,0:20:31.120
well as you know higher level, higher value means lower priority. so if this is
0:20:31.120,0:20:34.960
-a suitable pace for priority propogation
+a suitable pace for priority propagation
0:20:34.960,0:20:40.820
but what happens is that this owner is actually sleeping on another turnstile
@@ -1250,7 +1250,7 @@ of the second turnstile has always the same priority of its sleepers
so
0:20:50.750,0:20:55.530
-just propogating priority to the first owner was just unuseful because the first
+just propagating priority to the first owner was just unuseful because the first
0:20:55.530,0:20:56.340
one
@@ -1265,7 +1265,7 @@ still
keep the chain to a
0:21:00.580,0:21:04.820
-lower priority so it's was going to be propogated to the first one
+lower priority so it's was going to be propagated to the first one
0:21:04.820,0:21:07.679
actually running
@@ -1274,7 +1274,7 @@ lower priority so it's was going to be propogated to the first one
owner of the chain
0:21:09.870,0:21:14.670
-this is the situation after the propogation as you can see all of threads in the chain
+this is the situation after the propagation as you can see all of threads in the chain
0:21:14.670,0:21:16.559
has the same priority
@@ -1508,7 +1508,7 @@ the same conditions happens even for other kinds of lock
lockmgr and the sx lock
0:25:25.540,0:25:26.860
-so you cant hold
+so you can't hold
0:25:26.860,0:25:29.410
a mutex for example
@@ -1541,13 +1541,13 @@ and so can create some raisee problems
as the sleepqueues are born just to serve wait channels
0:26:04.779,0:26:09.190
- they don't track owner too so they dont care about priority propogation and priority inversion problem
+ they don't track owner too so they dont care about priority propagation and priority inversion problem
0:26:09.190,0:26:14.430
just because sleepqueues entirely should not have work
0:26:14.430,0:26:20.150
-so for example lockmgr and sx have not priority propogation
+so for example lockmgr and sx have not priority propagation
0:26:20.150,0:26:22.360
systems and the
@@ -1562,7 +1562,7 @@ sure
it's you mean why it's not
0:26:39.000,0:26:41.790
-why doesnt blocking primitives exist yeah?
+why doesn't blocking primitives exist yeah?
0:26:41.790,0:26:44.250
so imagine that for example the
@@ -1598,7 +1598,7 @@ using the blocking
the using the turnstile you will go to a
0:27:06.930,0:27:12.110
-always the mechanism of priority propogation and priority inversion handling.Its
+always the mechanism of priority propagation and priority inversion handling.Its
0:27:12.110,0:27:13.760
not very
@@ -1676,7 +1676,7 @@ but
however
0:28:12.340,0:28:17.669
-as you could have seen before the three containers create a heirarchy that
+as you could have seen before the three containers create a hierarchy that
0:28:17.669,0:28:20.090
should not be broken like
@@ -1730,7 +1730,7 @@ in FreeBSD that means that if the allocator is pretty busy or going to
to sleep
0:29:12.680,0:29:15.760
-in order to retreive your memory
+in order to retrieve your memory
0:29:15.760,0:29:17.890
and if you do with a lock hold
@@ -1853,7 +1853,7 @@ is the possibility to specify a wake up priority on the sleeping threads
once they are asleep
0:31:04.740,0:31:07.470
-that condvar still doesnt
+that condvar still doesn't
0:31:07.470,0:31:12.430
maybe if we could port these features to the condition variables we we will be able
@@ -2292,7 +2292,7 @@ not sure
would you repeat
0:39:59.919,0:40:03.879
- some voice please. No I cant hear
+ some voice please. No I can't hear
0:40:03.879,0:40:05.509
It seems to me that
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/bejtlich-networksecurity.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/bejtlich-networksecurity.sbv
index 640efb4491..126156708a 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/bejtlich-networksecurity.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/bejtlich-networksecurity.sbv
@@ -2071,7 +2071,7 @@ blah blah blah blah blah and something completely different
and I will say by the way
0:26:58.740,0:27:04.310
-I don't run the one sytem I expose in my home lab
+I don't run the one system I expose in my home lab
is not an Intel system
0:27:04.310,0:27:06.940
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/dixon-bsdisstilldying.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/dixon-bsdisstilldying.sbv
index 710812cc54..38ff8bffee 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/dixon-bsdisstilldying.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/dixon-bsdisstilldying.sbv
@@ -1259,7 +1259,7 @@ The challenges aren’t simply of the technological
nature,
0:20:53.540,0:20:57.750
-but includ a number of political and legal
+but include a number of political and legal
obstacles as well.
0:20:57.750,0:21:03.240
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/mckusick-historyofbsd.sbv b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/mckusick-historyofbsd.sbv
index 29d37e1d8b..5d17b36743 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/mckusick-historyofbsd.sbv
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/captions/2009/dcbsdcon/mckusick-historyofbsd.sbv
@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ uh was actually done by
other people many years uh later so 2.11
0:06:41.090,0:06:43.279
-does not preceed 3.0
+does not precede 3.0
0:06:43.279,0:06:48.550
Uh 2.11 is you know contemporary
@@ -905,7 +905,7 @@ for eighteen months to two years before you had
to start working about
0:12:28.789,0:12:31.030
-renweing et cetera.
+renewing et cetera.
0:12:31.030,0:12:33.180
Uh in any way
@@ -1215,7 +1215,7 @@ ran at 0.7 NIPs
Uh and so
0:16:25.480,0:16:28.920
-Bill needs to be able to run sometests back and forth
+Bill needs to be able to run some tests back and forth
between these machines
0:16:28.920,0:16:31.080
@@ -1502,6 +1502,7 @@ on because you know you give it to one person
0:20:32.890,0:20:38.010
and then someone else hears about it. They want it
then someone else wants it nahnah.....
+
0:20:38.010,0:20:42.030
It's not like today and where you just put it up
and anonymous FTP. This was still
@@ -2760,7 +2761,7 @@ and it was felt that we ought to have that
as well
0:37:54.839,0:37:57.150
-uh so bring Keith Bostick on board and
+uh so bring Keith Bostic on board and
0:37:57.150,0:37:59.560
Uh one of his of requirements for coming
@@ -3409,7 +3410,7 @@ students you know
0:46:41.830,0:46:45.309
there's not a question that a graduate student
-has never asked me that I hadn't dealed with,
+has never asked me that I hadn't dealt with,
0:46:45.309,0:46:51.309
and lawyer is not up to a graduate student.
@@ -3534,7 +3535,7 @@ and so that's why this distribution got hammered
FreeBSD had to do it
0:48:22.150,0:48:24.329
-the netBSD folks had to do it uh
+the NetBSD folks had to do it uh
0:48:24.329,0:48:26.289
and it was a huge amount of work but they
@@ -3909,4 +3910,4 @@ See I can take like five minutes to answer
one question.
0:53:45.349,0:53:45.599
-All right ! Well Thank You very much.
+All right! Well Thank You very much.
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/glossary/freebsd-glossary.sgml b/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/glossary/freebsd-glossary.sgml
index 12b50ac322..bd0dbc66c5 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/glossary/freebsd-glossary.sgml
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/glossary/freebsd-glossary.sgml
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@
interface the hardware presents to the operating system, so
that the operating system should need to know nothing about
the underlying hardware to make the most of it. <acronym>ACPI</acronym>
- evolves and supercedes the functionality provided previously by
+ evolves and supersedes the functionality provided previously by
<acronym>APM</acronym>, <acronym>PNPBIOS</acronym> and other technologies, and
provides facilities for controlling power consumption, machine
suspension, device enabling and disabling, etc.</para>
@@ -806,7 +806,7 @@
<glossdef>
<para>The packet transmitting protocol that is the basic protocol on
the Internet. Originally developed at the U.S. Department of
- Defense and an extremly important part of the <acronym>TCP/IP
+ Defense and an extremely important part of the <acronym>TCP/IP
</acronym> stack. Without the Internet Protocol, the Internet
would not have become what it is today. For more information, see
<ulink url="ftp://ftp.rfc-editor.org/in-notes/rfc791.txt">
@@ -899,7 +899,7 @@
<glossterm>Kilo Bits Per Second</glossterm>
<acronym>Kbps</acronym>
<glossdef>
- <para>Used to measure bandwith (how much data can pass a given
+ <para>Used to measure bandwidth (how much data can pass a given
point at a specified amount of time). Alternates to the Kilo
prefix include Mega, Giga, Tera, and so forth.</para>
</glossdef>
@@ -1587,7 +1587,7 @@
<acronym>RD</acronym>
<glossdef>
<para>An <acronym>RS232C</acronym> pin or wire that data is
- recieved on.</para>
+ received on.</para>
<glossseealso otherterm="td-glossary">
</glossdef>
</glossentry>
diff --git a/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/teams.ent b/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/teams.ent
index 27abfc9c9c..27ec09b0dd 100644
--- a/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/teams.ent
+++ b/en_US.ISO8859-1/share/sgml/teams.ent
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
<!--
Names and email address of teams of people working on specified
- tasks. Usally they're just mail aliases set up at hub.FreeBSD.org
+ tasks. Usually they're just mail aliases set up at hub.FreeBSD.org
Use these entities when referencing appropriate teams.