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authorKyle Evans <kevans@FreeBSD.org>2019-12-10 19:16:00 +0000
committerKyle Evans <kevans@FreeBSD.org>2019-12-10 19:16:00 +0000
commit6e816d8711558c9a7daf7959448b0c99d1fd07d1 (patch)
tree60b38b9957d85ba0d1ad65e2573ac26f08cf28df /share/vt/keymaps
parent0d42317659f4125c2bf7f6cbbaca157aac86a397 (diff)
downloadsrc-6e816d8711558c9a7daf7959448b0c99d1fd07d1.tar.gz
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sed: process \r, \n, and \t
This is both reasonable and a common GNUism that a lot of ported software expects. Universally process \r, \n, and \t into carriage return, newline, and tab respectively. Newline still doesn't function in contexts where it can't (e.g. BRE), but we process it anyways rather than passing UB \n (escaped ordinary) through to the underlying regex engine. Adding a --posix flag to disable these was considered, but sed.1 already declares this version of sed a super-set of POSIX specification and this behavior is the most likely expected when one attempts to use one of these escape sequences in pattern space. This differs from pre-r197362 behavior in that we now honor the three arguably most common escape sequences used with sed(1) and we do so outside of character classes, too. Other escape sequences, like \s and \S, will come later when GNU extensions are added to libregex; sed will likely link against libregex by default, since the GNU extensions tend to be fairly un-intrusive. PR: 229925 Reviewed by: bapt, emaste, pfg Differential Revision: https://reviews.freebsd.org/D22750
Notes
Notes: svn path=/head/; revision=355590
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